Home > Ephemeris Program, Lunar Eclipse > 04/10/2014 – Ephemeris – Get ready for the April 15, 2014 total lunar eclipse

04/10/2014 – Ephemeris – Get ready for the April 15, 2014 total lunar eclipse

April 10, 2014

Ephemeris for Thursday, April 10th.  The sun will rise at 7:07.  It’ll be up for 13 hours and 14 minutes, setting at 8:21.   The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 5:09 tomorrow morning.

Next Tuesday morning we’re in for a treat as the Moon enters the Earth’s shadow producing a total lunar eclipse.  The eclipse will be a challenge especially if you wait for April 15th to do your taxes.  Next Tuesday is tax deadline day, and the eclipse will happen is the wee hours of that morning.  You don’t have to watch the whole thing, but I will if it’s clear.  The partial phase begins as the Moon enters the earth’s inner shadow at 1:58 a.m.  Totality starts at 3:06 a.m. The entire Moon should be a red or orange color.  The depth of color will slowly change during totality until 4:24, when totality ends and the upper left edge of the moon again peeks into sunlight.  The ending partial eclipse will end at 5:33 a.m.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Lunar eclipse diagram

How a lunar eclipse happens. Credit spaceplace.nasa.gov

The outer shadow is the Earth’s penumbra which gradually darkens from the outside edge to the umbra, the Earth’s inner shadow.  It’s been my experience that it isn’t noticeable until about a half hour before the partial phase starts, when the Moon starts to dip into the umbra.

Here’s a link to the official NASA eclipse website for this eclipse.Here’s a link to my in-depth discussion of the April 15, 2014 eclipse.

 

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  1. Vincenzo
    April 10, 2014 at 10:28 pm

    Thanks for the info! I’ve got a question though. If I wanted to track the Earth’s shadow during the lenght of the eclipse, is there any way to get ephemeris for it? It would be nice to enter the data in my equatorial mount and have it track it automatically…

    • April 11, 2014 at 7:15 am

      Hi Vincenzo, That’s going to be tough. While the Earth’s shadow is directly opposite the Sun in the sky; the anti-solar point (right ascension plus or minus 12 hours, declination with the opposite sign of the Sun). The position of the shadow at the Moon’s distance depends on your location on Earth with respect to the Moon. Here’s examples from Cartes duCiel (Skycharts) from my location in northern Michigan.
      Position of the Earth's shadow at the start of the partial phase.
      Position of the Earth’s shadow at the start of the partial phase.

      Position of the Earth's shadow at the end of the partial phase
      Position of the Earth’s shadow at the end of the partial phase.

      Note that the center of the shadow is below the ecliptic (the yellow line). The direction of the change is vertical and based on the altitude angle of the anti-solar point for your location. The correction gives you it’s topocentric location in the sky.

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