Home > Ephemeris Program, Planets > 03/09/2016 – Ephemeris – With Venus and Mercury lost in twilight, Mars and Saturn are the only official morning planets easily seen now

03/09/2016 – Ephemeris – With Venus and Mercury lost in twilight, Mars and Saturn are the only official morning planets easily seen now

March 9, 2016

Ephemeris for Wednesday, March 9th.  The Sun will rise at 7:05.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 36 minutes, setting at 6:41.   The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 7:43 this evening.

Let’s check out the whereabouts of the bright naked eye planets.  Jupiter is up at sunset, and will pass due south, astronomers call it a transit, at 12:47 a.m., and will set at 7:14 a.m.  It’s below the stars of Leo now.  Binoculars can make out some of Jupiter’s moons, but a telescope is required to see Jupiter’s cloud formations.  Mars will rise next at 12:45 a.m. in the east-southeast.  It’s seen in eastern Libra almost entering the territory of Scorpius.  Saturn will rise at 1:56 a.m. in the east-southeast.  It’s above the stars of Scorpius, actually in Ophiuchus.  Its rings are a telescopic treat.  Venus will rise at 6:20 a.m. again in the east-southeast.  Mercury is lost in the bright morning twilight and will pass behind the Sun in superior conjunction on the 23rd.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Sorry for the late post, but preparation for my visit to Mill Creek Elementary school in Williamsburg, MI took some extra preparation.  Of course too I was watching the solar eclipse from Micronesia, both channels.

Jupiter and the spring constellations

Jupiter appears with the coming spring stars and constellations at 9 p.m., March 9, 2016. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and its moons

Jupiter and its moons in a telescope at 9 p.m. March 9, 2016. It’s apparent diameter is 44.4″.  Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Mars and Saturn

The morning planets Mars and Saturn are near each other in the south morning sky at 6 a.m. March 10, 2016. Created using Stellarium.

Mars

Mars as seen in a large telescope at high power. It’s only 9.5″ in diameter, about a quarter of Jupiter’s diameter. The large dark area in the center is Syrtis Major which sounds cooler than its English translation “Great Swamp”. South of it is the bright elliptical Hellas Basin. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Telescopic Saturn

Saturn and its moon Titan as they might be seen through a telescope at 6 a.m. March 10, 2016. The planet diameter is 16.8″ while the rings span 38.1″. Created using Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunrise and sunset

This is a chart showing the sunrise and sunset skies for March 9, 2016 showing the location of the planets and the Moon at that time. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

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