Home > Ephemeris Program, Jupiter, Observing, The Moon > 10/28/2016 – Ephemeris – The Moon will hang by Jupiter this morning

10/28/2016 – Ephemeris – The Moon will hang by Jupiter this morning

October 28, 2016

Ephemeris for Friday, October 28th.  The Sun will rise at 8:16.  It’ll be up for 10 hours and 20 minutes, setting at 6:36.  The Moon, 2 days before new, rose this morning at 6:02 and will rise at 7:01 tomorrow morning.

This morning the planet Jupiter and the Moon will appear close together in the morning sky.  Jupiter rose at 6:03 a.m.  After that until twilight becomes too bright both will appear together with Jupiter to the right of the thin waning crescent Moon.  They passed each other at 4:18 (8:18 UT) this morning.  Jupiter will appear to move farther from the Sun in the coming months, more the Sun moving away from it caused by the Earth’s motion around the Sun.  Jupiter will enter the evening sky in April next year, passing in front of the zodiacal constellation of Virgo.  By then we will have lost Venus as our Evening Star, so Jupiter will have no competition when it arrives from the east.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon and Jupiter at 7 a.m. EDT (11:00 UT) this morning October 28, 2016.  Stellarium and any other planetarium program cannot display the dynamic range of he sky.  The sliver of the moon should be a lot brightes, including earthshine on its night side.  I had to delete a star that was showing way too bright when it should be barely visible.  Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

The Moon and Jupiter at 7 a.m. EDT (11:00 UT) this morning October 28, 2016. Stellarium and any other planetarium program cannot display the dynamic range of he sky. The sliver of the moon should be a lot brighter, including earthshine on its night side. I had to delete a star that was showing way too bright when it should be barely visible. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

For observers in the UK and Europe the Moon will appear above Jupiter.  As a rule of thumb, the Moon moves its own diameter in an hour against the stars.  In the sky in the east just before sunrise the Moon will be moving down and to the left in relation to Jupiter.

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