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03.14/2017 – Ephemeris – It’s Pi Day!

March 14, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Pi Day 3.14, Tuesday, March 14th.  The Sun will rise at 7:56.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 51 minutes, setting at 7:47.  The Moon, 2 days past full, will rise at 10:04 this evening.

Welcome to Pi Day.  I had some NASA inspired links posted on this blog this past Sunday for your enjoyment.  Also simply do an Internet search for Pi Day and lots of fun information and activities will be listed.  I remember an exercise in high school calculating pi with an inscribed polygon in a circle of ever increasing numbers of sides.  Somewhere in there I messed up and came out with an answer that didn’t quite get there.  This was in the years B.C. that is Before Calculators.  Speaking of round things, Jupiter will rise this evening followed by the Moon and the star Spica in the east.  They will all be up by 10:30.  Jupiter is not yet an evening planet, since it is not up by sunset.  It’s still seen in the morning sky.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addenda

Had I known in the tenth grade this strategy to calculate pi, I could have saved myself a lot of grief.  Simply google calculate pi with toothpicks.  One of the hits was this from Science Friday:  https://sciencefriday.com/articles/estimate-pi-by-dropping-sticks/*.  Basically it’s by dropping lots of toothpicks on a piece of paper with parallel lines spaced the length of the toothpicks apart.  The total number of toothpicks dropped times two divided by the number of toothpicks that cross a line will approximate pi.  The more drops, the closer to pi one gets.

  • In the formula in the link, if the length of the toothpicks equals the distance between the lines, those terms drop out of the formula.

Grouping of Jupiter, the Moon and the star Spica

Jupiter, the Moon and the star Spica

Jupiter, the Moon and the star Spica at 11 p.m. March 14, 2016. Since the Moon moves eastward about its diameter an hour. So observers east or west of here will see the Moon in a different position in relation to these other two bodies. Created using Stellarium.

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