Home > Ephemeris Program, Lunar Eclipse, Observing, The Moon > 11/18/2021 – Ephemeris – An almost total eclipse of the Moon will be visible early tomorrow morning

11/18/2021 – Ephemeris – An almost total eclipse of the Moon will be visible early tomorrow morning

November 18, 2021

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, November 18th. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 5:11, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:45. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 7:58 tomorrow morning.

Should our normal November clouds depart in the early morning hours tomorrow, we will be treated with a very deep partial eclipse of the Moon. At 4:03 am, the Moon will be 97% immersed into the Earth’s inner shadow, with lower left edge peeking out into sunlight. I haven’t heard of any massive volcanic eruptions in our Southern Hemisphere, so the light leaking and bent though the Earth’s atmosphere from all the simultaneous sunrises and sunsets during the eclipse won’t be too diminished and give us a coppery hue in the shadow. The shadow will touch the Moon at its top edge at 2:19 am. The maximum will occur at 4:03 am, and the last bit of the shadow will depart at the lower right edge of the Moon at 5:47 am.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EST, UT – 5 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Partial Lunar Eclipse 11/19/21 4:05 EST maximum

November 19, 2021, partial lunar eclipse maximum at 4:05 am EST. Orientation of the Moon and shadow could be different if not viewing from Northern Michigan. Created using Stellarium.

Lunar Eclipse Diagram

Lunar Eclipse Diagram for November 19, 2021. Effects of the eclipse on the Moon at P1 and P4 are not visible. U1 is the Moon at the beginning of the partial eclipse. U4 is the Moon at the end of the partial eclipse. A duskiness on the Moon’s face on the side closest to the umbral shadow will be visible just before and after the partial eclipse. Note that this diagram is not at the same orientation that an observer might experience. Created from a NASA PDF document on the NASA Eclipse Website. https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html.

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