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Archive for the ‘Eclipses’ Category

07/12/2018 – Ephemeris – A partial solar eclipse today will be visible from south Australia

July 12, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, July 12th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 18 minutes, setting at 9:27, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:09. The Moon is new today, and won’t be visible.

There’s a minor partial solar eclipse late tonight our time

for extreme southern Australia and Tasmania. This will be followed in two weeks with a total lunar eclipse for mostly Africa and Asia. Two weeks and a day after that their will be a partial solar eclipse from northeastern Canada to Asia. When is the next solar eclipse visible here in northern Michigan? That would be June 10, 2021. The Sun will rise with the eclipse more than half over with the Moon taking a big bite out of the left side of the Sun. It will be all over by 6:40 a.m. However, for Canada north of Minnesota, the Sun will rise as a ring of fire because the Moon won’t be big enough to block the entire disk of the Sun. But on April 8, 2024 the Sun will be totally eclipsed in the US from Texas to Maine.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Maps for the solar eclipses discussed captured from the calendar function of Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts):

Partial Solar Eclipse Map 2018-07-13

Partial Solar Eclipse Map for July 13, 2018. Mid eclipse 11 p.m. EDT July 12. Click on image for the actual NASA full size image. Eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak NASA/GSFC.

Partial Solar Eclipse Map 2018-08-11

Partial Solar Eclipse Map for August 11, 2018. Click on image for the actual NASA full size image. Eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak NASA/GSFC.

Annular Solar Eclipse Map 2021-6-10

Annular Solar Eclipse Map for June 10, 2021. Click on image for the actual NASA full size image. Eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak NASA/GSFC.

Total Solar Eclipse Map 2024-04-08

Total Solar Eclipse Map for April 8, 2014. Click on image for the actual NASA full size image. Eclipse predictions by Fred Espenak NASA/GSFC.

Here’s a link to NASA’s table of the solar eclipses of the 2020s which has links to global and interactive Google maps for each eclipse:  https://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEgoogle/SEgoogle2021.html.

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02/15/2018 – Ephemeris – There are three solar eclipses this year, today is the first

February 15, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, February 15th. The Sun will rise at 7:43. It’ll be up for 10 hours and 28 minutes, setting at 6:11. The Moon is new today, and won’t be visible. There will be a solar eclipse today that will be a partial blocking of the Sun for parts of Antarctica and southern South America. This is the first solar eclipse to occur since the Great American Eclipse last August. There are three solar eclipses this year and they are all partials with the core of the Moon’s shadow just missing the Earth to the north or south. This year there is another total lunar eclipse, but we will be facing the Sun in daytime when it happens and won’t be able to see it. That lunar eclipse will be visible in Europe and Asia July 27th. One of the other partial solar eclipses will occur 2 weeks before and the other two weeks after that lunar eclipse. That happens when the Moon passes very near the center of the Earth’s shadow.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Circumstanced for eclipses.

There are two eclipse seasons a year at an average interval of 5.7 months. Usually there is a solar and a lunar eclipse at each season, unless there is a central lunar eclipse, when it can be bracketed by a partial solar eclipse about two weeks before and again after. Public domain with annotations by the author.

08/08/2017 – Ephemeris – Eclipse seasons

August 7, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Monday, August 7th. The Sun rises at 6:36. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 23 minutes, setting at 8:59. The Moon, at full today, will rise at 9:00 this evening.

At two weeks before the great solar eclipse, the world is experiencing another eclipse, this one is a partial lunar eclipse where the Moon will just clip the northern part of the Earth’s shadow this afternoon our time. It will be mainly visible from Asia. Eclipses occur in seasons of about a month long that occur at a bit less than six month intervals, so eclipses will occur a little earlier next year to the this. That’s because the crossing points of the Moon’s and the Earth’s orbital planes regress slowly westward. In an eclipse season two eclipses will occur: a solar and a lunar eclipse. On rare occasion when a lunar eclipse occurs in the center of a season a partial solar eclipse can occur two weeks before and again after the lunar eclipse, but they will affect the opposite polar regions of the Earth.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Table of this and next three eclipse seasons

Date Eclipse Type Notes
08/07/2017 Lunar Eclipse – partial Moon clips northern part of Earth’s umbra
08/21/2017 Solar Eclipse – total Path of totality crosses US
01/31/2018 Lunar Eclipse – total Moon crosses just south of center of umbra
02/15/2018 Solar Eclipse – partial  Visible mostly from Antarctica
07/13/2018 Solar Eclipse – partial Seen from southern Australia
07/27/2018 Lunar Eclipse – total Moon crosses center of umbra
08/11/2018 Solar Eclipse – partial Seen from northern Europe, Asia
01/06/2019 Solar Eclipse – partial Seen mostly from northern Pacific Ocean
01/21/2019 Lunar Eclipse – total Moon crosses just north of center of umbra

05/05/2017 – Ephemeris – A preview of the upcoming total solar eclipse and two star parties this weekend

May 5, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, May 5th.  The Sun rises at 6:26.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 25 minutes, setting at 8:52.  The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 4:44 tomorrow morning.

On August 21st this year there will be a total solar eclipse visible from a narrow band that crosses the continental United States from Oregon to South Carolina.  It will be a fantastic sight.  From around here the eclipse will be a deep partial eclipse with the moon covering 75% of the Sun’s disk.  This evening yours truly will show how to view the eclipse safely at the 8 p.m. meeting of the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society at the Northwestern Michigan College’s Observatory.

At 9 p.m. there will be a star party.  Tomorrow night there will be, weather permitting a 9 p.m. star party that will be held at the Interlochen Center for the Arts at the soccer field, on the Duck Lake side of the Campus.  Parking is off Lyon Street.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

03/27/2017 – Ephemeris – 5 more new moons before the Great American Total Solar Eclipse!

March 27, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, March 27th.  The Sun will rise at 7:32.  It’ll be up for 12 hours and 31 minutes, setting at 8:04.  The Moon is new today, and won’t be visible.

The Moon will be officially new at 10:57 this evening.  Later this year there will occur at total solar eclipse visible from a narrow path the crosses the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.  It will cross the cities of Casper Wyoming, Kansas City, just south of St Louis, Carbondale, Illinois; Nashville, Columbia and Charleston South Carolina.  Carbondale is about the closest spot to us at about 600 miles.  We will see about 75-80 percent of the Sun blocked by the Moon here in northern Michigan.  The is generally a solar eclipse about every six new moons, the exception is an occasional solar eclipse on two consecutive new moons, except they will occur in opposite polar regions and are rarely total.  The Moon’s orbit is tilted by 5° to the Sun’s path.  This time the Moon is way south of the Sun.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

August 21, 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Path of Totality

A screen cap of the map showing the path of totality of the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse from NASA’s eclipse page. Credit: NASA and Google Maps.

The points are GE greatest eclipse, path width 71.27 miles (114.7 km); and GD greatest duration of totality, 2 minutes and 40.2 seconds.

Eclipse shadow animation

An animation of the Moon’s shadow as it will cross the Earth’s surface August 21, 2017. Credit A.T. Sinclair/NASA

NASA’s Eclipse page:  https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/

Solar Corona

The solar corona displayed during the July 10, 1072 total solar eclipse from Prince Edward Island. Credit Bob Moler.

Diamond Ring

Diamond ring at the end of totality of the total solar eclipse July 10, 1972. Credit Bob Moler.

Baily's Beads

Baily’s Beads – sunlight streaming through the valleys at the edge of the Moon at the end of totality, March 7, 1970, outside Bladenboro NC. Credit Bob Moler.

On May 5th, I’ll be giving a talk about the upcoming total solar eclipse.  How to enjoy its partial phases here and along the path of totality.

 

02/27/2017 – Ephemeris – The Great American Eclipse, August 21, 2017

February 27, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Monday, February 27th.  The Sun will rise at 7:22.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 5 minutes, setting at 6:28.  The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 7:52 this evening.

We didn’t get a chance to see yesterday’s annular eclipse of the Sun, since it occurred mostly in the South Atlantic Ocean.  But it’s a wake up call for those of us who chase the Moon’s shadow, that the Great American Eclipse is a bit less than 6 months away.  August 21st to be exact.  Here in northern Michigan the Sun will be 75% or so covered by the Moon at peak.  For me it’s 100% or nothing.  The path where the Sun will be totally eclipsed will run from Oregon to South Carolina.  I’ve seen totality four times from 1963 to 1979 and accumulated 8 ½ minutes of time basking under the shade of the Moon.  Well not basking, for those were hectic magical times, not to be missed.  And come hell or high water I will strive to add another 2 plus minutes to that total.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

August 21, 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Path of Totality

A screen cap of the map showing the path of totality of the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse from NASA’s eclipse page. Credit: NASA and Google Maps.

NASA’s Eclipse page:  https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/

 

10/07/2016 – Ephemeris – Busy astronomical weekend in Traverse City

October 7, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, October 7th.  The Sun will rise at 7:48.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 22 minutes, setting at 7:11.  The Moon, 2 days before first quarter, will set at 11:30 this evening.

This is another busy weekend for the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society.  Tonight there will be a general meeting of the society at 8 p.m. followed by a star party at 9 p.m. at Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory, located on Birmley Road south of Traverse City, to which all are welcome.  The featured speaker for the meeting will be Randy Leach presenting Astrophotography for the Average Guy.  Photographing the sky without spending big bucks.  Tomorrow evening members of the society will be on the north side of the 200  block of East Front street in Traverse City with their telescopes for the International Observe the Moon Night.  We’ll start at 7 p.m. if it’s clear.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Substitute speaker:  Yours truly:  Personal recollections of 4 total solar eclipses and a look ahead at next year’s eclipse.