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05/25/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 25, 2022 Leave a comment

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 25th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 10 minutes, setting at 9:15, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:04. The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 4:22 tomorrow morning. | Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are back in the morning sky, although the newcomer, Mercury, is too close to the Sun to be seen, and may stay that way for the rest of its morning appearance. That’s at least for those as far north as we are (45° N). At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, will be the thin crescent Moon. Farther right is the quite bright Jupiter. Just to the right of Jupiter will be the dimmest of the 4, Mars, which is closing on Jupiter. The two will seem to pass each other on Sunday. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the southeast.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Morning planets

All the morning planets except Mercury, which is too close to the Sun to be seen, will be visible at 5 am tomorrow morning, May 26, 2022. The labels for Mars and Jupiter are on top of each other. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Waning crescent moon

The waning crescent moon as it might appear in binoculars tomorrow morning, May 26, 2022. Earth shine might also illuminate the Moon’s night side. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, May 26, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 14.13″, 76.1% illuminated; Saturn 17.20″, its rings 40.06″; Jupiter 36.80″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.30″ and is 87.7% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on May 25, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 26th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/23/2022 – Ephemeris – the Moon and the morning planets plus the Big Dipper’s stars Mizar and Alcor

May 23, 2022 Leave a comment

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Monday, May 23rd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 6 minutes, setting at 9:13, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:05. The Moon, 1 day past last quarter, will rise at 3:44 tomorrow morning.

This week, the Moon is in the process of passing the morning planets. This morning it passed Saturn. Tomorrow afternoon and evening it will pass Mars, then Jupiter. By Thursday morning, the Moon will be below and left of Jupiter. Thursday evening, it will pass Venus.

Back to tonight’s sky, the Big Dipper is nearly overhead. In its handle is a star or two that are interesting. It’s the star at the bend in the handle. It’s called Mizar. Next to it, for those with good eyesight, is a dimmer star, called Alcor. The name Mizar is from the Arabic, meaning apron or cover, while Alcor means the forgotten one. Before optometrists, the ability to actually see both stars was a test for good eyesight, especially for Arabic warriors. The pair is also known as the “Horse and the Rider”.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon passing the morning planets 5/23/22 to 5/27/22

The Moon passing the morning planets at 5 am 5/23/2022 to 5/27/2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Mizar and Alcor in the Big Dipper

Mizar and Alcor in the Big Dipper as it is nearly overhead towards the north. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Alcor seems to be a true companion to Mizar, since they are at the same distance of 81.7 light years. Alcor also has an unseen companion star. Mizar also has a much closer companion star that can be seen in a telescope. On top of that, each of them has another unseen companion star. Six stars for the price of two. What a deal.

How can you detect a companion star that can’t be seen? When analyzing a star’s spectra, the companion star betrays it presence by its chemical absorption lines shifting with respect to its primary due to the Doppler effect of its motion.

05/20/2022 – Ephemeris – Spring constellations: Corvus the crow

May 20, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Friday, May 20th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours even, setting at 9:09, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:08. The Moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 2:23 tomorrow morning.

The small constellation of Corvus the crow is located low in the south at 10:30 this evening. It’s made of 6 dim stars, but the pattern is a distinctive but distorted box with two stars at the upper left marking that corner, and another two marking the lower right corner. I usually don’t notice the extra star at these corners, which denote the wings of this crow in flight to the upper right. To me the box is distinctive enough. It’s pretty much alone below Virgo and its bright star Spica, left an above it. I don’t see a crow here, but the box is distinctive in that no two sides are parallel. In the US we call the shape a trapezium, the British call it a trapezoid. Anyway it is a very memorable shape, at least to me.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Corvus finder animation

Corvus the crow finder animation for 10:30 pm, May 20th. My visualization of the crow flying to the upper right doesn’t match the one the artist drew in this depiction. There’s no right or wrong. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

05/19/2022 – Ephemeris – Spring constellations: Virgo

May 19, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, May 19th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 58 minutes, setting at 9:08, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:09. The Moon, halfway from full to last quarter, will rise at 1:40 tomorrow morning.

Tonight at 11 p.m. in the south is the constellation and member of the zodiac: Virgo the virgin. Virgo is a large constellation of a reclining woman holding a stalk of wheat. Spica, the bluest of the first magnitude stars, is the head of that spike of wheat; and as such it ruled over the harvest in two of Virgo’s guises as the goddesses Persephone and Ceres. Virgo is also identified as Astraea the goddess of justice. The constellation of Libra, the scales, which she is associated with, is found just east of her low in the southeast. Early Christians who sought to de-paganize the heavens saw Virgo as the Virgin Mary. Virgo is the host to a great cluster of galaxies seen far beyond its stars, which belong to our galaxy.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Virgo finder animation

Virgo finder animation with Libra added for 11 p.m. tonight, May 19th. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Virgo

Virgo as depicted in Urania’s Mirror, a set of constellation cards published in London c.1825. From the Library of Congress. H/T Wikipedia.

Brighter members of the Virgo Cluster. Created using Stellarium.

Brighter members of the Virgo Cluster. Created using Stellarium. Open circles are galaxies, circles with crosses are globular star clusters, outlying members of our Milky Way galaxy.

05/12/2022 – Ephemeris – There will be a total eclipse of the Moon this Sunday night/Monday morning

May 12, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, May 12th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 43 minutes, setting at 9:01, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:16. The Moon, halfway from first quarter to full, will set at 5:06 tomorrow morning.

Late Sunday night through early Monday morning May 15/16 there will be a total eclipse of the Moon which will run from 10:28 pm Sunday night to 1:55 Monday morning. I’ll be more specific tomorrow. Also known as lunar eclipses, these only occur at full moon when the Moon crosses the earth’s shadow. Usually, the Moon passes too far north or south to run into earth’s shadow. In only in one in six full moons does this happen. To see it, one has to be on the night side of the Earth. And it has to be clear at your location, a big problem around here. Our last lunar eclipse in November was clouded out from my location, which is usually my luck with lunar eclipses. However, May is a better month. Here’s hoping.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Lunar Eclipse Geometry

How lunar eclipses occur. Credit NASA/Fred Espenak.

05-16-22 Lunar eclipse diagram2

The eclipse occurs on the 16th for Universal Time, because the eclipse events take place after 8 pm EDT on the 15th. The Moon travels through the Earth’s shadow from right to left. What are seen are points of contact with the shadow and mid-eclipse. On the world map, locations in the white or light part of the map can see all or part of the eclipse. From Five Millennium Canon of Lunar Eclipses (Espenak & Meeus) NASA, with additions by me.

Contact times are labeled P1, U1, U2, U3, U4, and P4. P2 and P3 are omitted because they are synonymous with U1 and U4, respectively. Times are EDT unless noted:

  • P1 – 9:32:07 pm (1:32:07 UT) Enter the penumbra (unseen). By about 9 pm, the duskiness on the left edge of the moon will start to be noticeable. Wearing sunglasses to dim the bright Moon will help show the effect.
  • U1 – 10:27:53 pm (2:27:53 UT) Enter the umbra (partial eclipse begins).
  • U2 – 11:29:03 pm (3:29:03 UT) Totality begins.
  • Mid-eclipse 12:11:28.8 am (4:11:28.8 UT)
  • U3 – 12:53:56 am (4:53:56 UT) Totality ends, the egress partial phase begins.
  • U4 – 1:55:07 am (5:55:07 UT) Partial phase ends. The Moon’s upper right edge should appear dusky for the next half hour or so.
  • P4 – 2:50:48 am (6:50:48 UT) Penumbral phase ends (unseen).

05/11/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 11, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 11th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 40 minutes, setting at 8:59, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:18. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 4:45 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. The one bright planet in the evening sky, Mercury, is now too dim and close to the Sun to be seen, so the only planet action is in the morning sky where the other 4 naked-eye planets are. At 5:15 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out low from the east to southeast with brilliant Venus lowest and due east to Saturn almost exactly in the southeast. Venus may be missed at that time, but may be up sufficiently by 5:30. To the right of Venus is the quite bright Jupiter. Farther right will be the dimmest of the four, Mars. Farther to the right will be Saturn. All will be in A sloping to the upper right. They are still quite a sight to behold in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Annotated Binocular Moon

Animated annotated Binocular Moon for this evening, May 11, 2022. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas, GIMP and LibreOffice.

Translations

Mare Crisium – Sea of Crises
Mare Fecunditatis – Sea of Fertility
Mare Frigoris – Sea of Cold
Mare Imbrium – Sea of Showers
Mare Nectaris – Sea of Nectar
Mare Nubium – Sea of Clouds
Mare Serenitatis – Sea of Serenity
Mare Tranquillitatis – Sea of Tranquility
Mare Vaporum – Sea of Vapors
Sinus Iridium – Bay of Rainbows
Sinus Medii – Bay of the Center

Note that Mare is pronounced Mar-é

Morning planet parade

The morning planet parade is widening as Venus is moving away from Jupiter, and Mars is approaching Jupiter. These are shown at 5:15 am, or about an hour before sunrise tomorrow morning, May 12, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:15 am, May 12, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 15.42″, 71.6% illuminated; Saturn 16.79″, its rings 39.12″; Jupiter 35.60″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 5.99″ and is 88.6% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on May 11, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 12th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets except Mercury are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/09/2022 – Ephemeris – Monday’s Moon

May 9, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Monday, May 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 35 minutes, setting at 8:57, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:20. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 4:03 tomorrow morning.

Nothing is more fun than to look at the Moon through binoculars or a small telescope around its first quarter phase. The little gray oval on the face of the Moon on its upper right, not connected to all the other gray areas, is called the Sea of Crises or Mare Crisium. I use Mare Crisium as a telltale for the Moon’s libration or wobble. Tonight Crisium is close to the edge of the Moon, so on a day after first quarter, we’re seeing somewhat more territory on the left side of the Moon than we normally would at this phase. At the bottom or south end of the Moon are two prominent craters visible even in binoculars, the small but distinct Tycho, and the much larger Clavius, whose floor contains other craters and is convex following the curvature of the Moon.

Reminder: There will be a total lunar eclipse occurring a week from this morning, actually starting Sunday evening Eastern Daylight Time. I’ll give you full details later in the week. That’s the evening of May 15th, through morning of the 16th.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

8-day old Moon

The 8-day-old Moon labeled via animated GIF, as it would appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight, May 9, 2022. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas, GIMP and LibreOffice Draw.

Translations

Mare Crisium – Sea of Crises
Mare Fecunditatis – Sea of Fertility
Mare Frigoris – Sea of Cold
Mare Imbrium – Sea of Showers
Mare Nectaris – Sea of Nectar
Mare Nubium – Sea of Clouds
Mare Serenitatis – Sea of Serenity
Mare Tranquillitatis – Sea of Tranquility
Sinus Medii – Bay of the Center

Note that Mare is pronounced Mar-é

05/05/2022 – Ephemeris – Halley’s Comet returns… in pieces

May 5, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Cinco de Mayo, Thursday, May 5th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 25 minutes, setting at 8:52, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:25. The Moon, 3 days before first quarter, will set at 1:53 tomorrow morning.

The Eta Aquariid meteor shower will reach peak at about 4 am, tomorrow morning. However, the radiant, the apparent source of the meteor streaks, doesn’t rise until 3:15 am. If you’re waiting to see the return of Halley’s Comet, you needn’t wait until the main body of the comet returns in 2061. Halley’s Comet has made many passes of the inner solar system in recorded history, and more before that, returning to the inner solar system every 76 years or so, before returning to its frigid home beyond Neptune. It’s closest pass to the Sun, called perihelion, is inside Venus’ orbit. On the way in and out, it passes close to the Earth’s orbit. It has left a trail of debris, which we pass through in May and again in October.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Eta Aquariid radiant

The Eta Aquariid meteor shower radiant as it will be apparent tomorrow morning at 4:30 or at the beginning of nautical twilight. The radiant isn’t a ting that can be seen, but the point from which all the meteors of this shower can be traced back to. The funny looking lower case “n” is the Greek letter eta. The shower is named for the star seen just above the radiant, which is in the center of a small triangle of stars that make up Aquarius’ water jar. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

05/02/2022 – Ephemeris – The Moon and Mercury together where we can see them

May 2, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Monday, May 2nd. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 17 minutes, setting at 8:49, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:29. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 11:02 this evening.

The two-day-old thin sliver of a Moon will be left and above Mercury this evening. About the best time to spot them is between 9:30 and 10:15 pm, low in the western sky. They will be seen in the west-northwest. As we move through the week, the Moon will move away from Mercury to the east, while Mercury heads back toward the Sun and, dimming as it goes. Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun and averages 40 percent of the Earth’s distance from the Sun, so it is never seen at our northerly latitude outside of twilight. Mercury has the most elliptical orbit of the major planets. And it happens that at the best times to see Mercury, on spring evenings and autumn mornings, Mercury is at its nearest to the Sun. Southern Hemisphere observers get a better look at it because their best observing times are when Mercury is farthest from the Sun.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mercury and the 2-day-old Moon

Mercury and the 2-day-old Moon as they might appear at 9:30 pm, or about 40 minutes after sunset tonight, May 2, 2022, looking low to the west-northwest. Aldebaran, slightly dimmer than Mercury, is the star to the left of the Moon. Created using Stellarium.

04/29/2022 – Ephemeris – Previewing the skies of May 2022

April 29, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Arbor Day, Friday, April 29th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 9 minutes, setting at 8:45, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:34. The Moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 6:36 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the month of May’s skies. Daylight hours in the Interlochen/Traverse City area will increase from 14 hours and 15 minutes this Sunday the 1st to 15 hours 19 minutes on May 31st. The altitude, or angle, of the Sun above the southern horizon at local noon will ascend from 60 degrees Sunday to 67 degrees at month’s end. The altitude of the Sun in the Straits area will be a degree lower than that but your length of daylight will be a few minutes longer. Local apparent noon this month, when the Sun passes due south, will be about 1:38 p.m. The Eta Aquariid meteor shower will reach its peak about 3 a.m. on the 5th. The big event this month will be a total eclipse of the Moon starting late Sunday evening the 15th.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

May Evening Star Chart

May 2022 Evening Star Chart

Star Chart for May 2022 (11 p.m. EDT May 15, 2022). Click on image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program. Click on image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

The planets and stars are plotted for the 15th at 11 p.m. EDT in the evening and 4 a.m. for the morning chart. These are the chart times. Note that Traverse City is located approximately 45 minutes behind our time meridian, West 75° longitude. (An hour 45 minutes behind our daylight saving time meridian during EDT). To duplicate the star positions on a planisphere you may have to set it to 1 hour 45 minutes earlier than the current time.
Note the chart times of 11 p.m. and 4 a.m. are for the 15th. For each week before the 15th add ½ hour (28 minutes if you’re picky). For each week after the 15th subtract ½ hour, or 28 minutes. The planet positions are updated each Wednesday on this blog. For planet positions on dates other than the 15th, check the Wednesday planet posts on this blog for weekly positions.

May Morning Star Chart

Star Chart May 2022 Morning

Star Chart for May mornings, 2022 (4 a.m. EDT, May 15, 2022). Click on image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

For a list of constellation names to go with the abbreviations click here.

  • Pointer stars at the front of the bowl of the Big Dipper point to Polaris the North Star.
  • Leaky dipper drips on Leo
  • Follow the arc of the handle of the Big Dipper to the star Arcturus, and
  • Extend like a spike to Spica,
  • EaqR is the radiant of the Eta Aquariid meteor shower that peaks on the 6th.

Twilight Limits, Nautical and Astronomical

EDT
Morning Twilight Evening Twilight Dark Night Moon
Date Astro. Nautical Nautical Astro. Start End Illum.
2021-05-01 4h40m 5h24m 22h02m 22h47m 22h47m 1h35m 0.67
2021-05-02 4h38m 5h23m 22h04m 22h49m 22h49m 2h32m 0.57
2021-05-03 4h36m 5h21m 22h05m 22h51m 22h51m 3h17m 0.46
2021-05-04 4h33m 5h19m 22h07m 22h53m 22h53m 3h52m 0.36
2021-05-05 4h31m 5h17m 22h09m 22h55m 22h55m 4h20m 0.27
2021-05-06 4h29m 5h16m 22h10m 22h57m 22h57m 4h29m 0.18
2021-05-07 4h27m 5h14m 22h12m 22h59m 22h59m 4h27m 0.11
2021-05-08 4h25m 5h12m 22h13m 23h01m 23h01m 4h25m 0.06
2021-05-09 4h23m 5h11m 22h15m 23h03m 23h03m 4h23m 0.02
2021-05-10 4h21m 5h09m 22h16m 23h05m 23h05m 4h21m 0
2021-05-11 4h19m 5h07m 22h18m 23h07m 23h07m 4h19m 0
2021-05-12 4h17m 5h06m 22h19m 23h09m 23h09m 4h17m 0.02
2021-05-13 4h15m 5h04m 22h21m 23h11m 23h11m 4h15m 0.05
2021-05-14 4h13m 5h03m 22h23m 23h13m 4h13m 0.1
2021-05-15 4h11m 5h01m 22h24m 23h15m 0h07m 4h11m 0.17
2021-05-16 4h09m 5h00m 22h26m 23h17m 1h00m 4h09m 0.25
2021-05-17 4h07m 4h58m 22h27m 23h19m 1h46m 4h07m 0.34
2021-05-18 4h05m 4h57m 22h28m 23h21m 2h25m 4h05m 0.44
2021-05-19 4h03m 4h56m 22h30m 23h23m 2h58m 4h03m 0.54
2021-05-20 4h01m 4h54m 22h31m 23h24m 3h26m 4h01m 0.65
2021-05-21 4h00m 4h53m 22h33m 23h26m 3h51m 4h00m 0.76
2021-05-22 3h58m 4h52m 22h34m 23h28m 0.85
2021-05-23 3h56m 4h51m 22h36m 23h30m 0.92
2021-05-24 3h54m 4h49m 22h37m 23h32m 0.98
2021-05-25 3h53m 4h48m 22h38m 23h34m 1
2021-05-26 3h51m 4h47m 22h40m 23h36m 0.99
2021-05-27 3h49m 4h46m 22h41m 23h38m 0.95
2021-05-28 3h48m 4h45m 22h42m 23h39m 23h39m 0.89
2021-05-29 3h46m 4h44m 22h43m 23h41m 23h41m 0h19m 0.81
2021-05-30 3h45m 4h43m 22h45m 23h43m 23h43m 1h11m 0.72
2021-05-31 3h44m 4h42m 22h46m 23h44m 23h44m 1h52m 0.61

The twilight calendar was generated using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts), with some corrections.

See my blog post: Twilight Zone for the definitions of the different periods of twilight here: https://bobmoler.wordpress.com/2018/09/27/.

NASA Calendar of Planetary Events

    Date     Time     Event
May  1  Su            Venus: 42.4° W
     1  Su   3:52 pm  Moon Ascending Node
     2  Mo  10:17 am  Moon-Mercury: 2° N
     5  Th   4:57 am  Uranus Conjunction
     5  Th   8:46 am  Moon Apogee: 405300 km
     5  Th  11:55 am  Moon North Dec.: 27° N
     6  Fr   4:00 am  Eta Aquarid Shower: ZHR = 60
     6  Fr   6:56 pm  Moon-Pollux: 2.3° N
     7  Sa   8:23 pm  Moon-Beehive: 4° S
     8  Su   8:21 pm  First Quarter
    15  Su   7:44 pm  Moon Descending Node
    16  Mo  12:11 am  Total Lunar Eclipse
    16  Mo  12:14 am  Full Flower Moon
    17  Tu  11:23 am  Moon Perigee: 360300 km
    18  We   9:21 pm  Moon South Dec.: 27° S
    21  Sa   3:14 pm  Mercury Inferior Conj.
    22  Su  12:43 am  Moon-Saturn: 4.6° N
    22  Su   2:43 pm  Last Quarter
    24  Tu   3:24 pm  Moon-Mars: 2.9° N
    24  Tu   7:59 pm  Moon-Jupiter: 3.4° N
    26  Th  10:52 pm  Moon-Venus: 0.2° N
    28  Sa  10:33 pm  Moon Ascending Node
    29  Su   4:57 am  Mars-Jupiter: 0.6° N
    30  Mo   7:30 am  New Moon
Jun  1  We            Venus: 36.5° W

Sky Events Calendar by Fred Espenak and Sumit Dutta (NASA’s GSFC),
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SKYCAL/SKYCAL.html.

Sun and Moon Rising and Setting Events

     LU                  Ephemeris of Sky Events for Interlochen/TC
May, 2022    Local time zone: EDT
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| DATE |  SUN     SUN  DAYLIGHT|   TWILIGHT*    |MOON  RISE OR    ILLUM |
|      |  RISE    SET    HOURS |  END    START  |PHASE SET** TIME FRACTN|
+=======================================================================+
|Sun  1| 06:32a  08:47p  14:15 | 10:00p  05:20a |      Set  09:56p    1%|
|Mon  2| 06:31a  08:49p  14:17 | 10:01p  05:18a |      Set  11:02p    4%|
|Tue  3| 06:29a  08:50p  14:20 | 10:03p  05:17a |      Set  12:05a    9%|
|Wed  4| 06:28a  08:51p  14:23 | 10:04p  05:15a |      Set  01:03a   15%|
|Thu  5| 06:27a  08:52p  14:25 | 10:06p  05:13a |      Set  01:53a   23%|
|Fri  6| 06:25a  08:53p  14:28 | 10:08p  05:11a |      Set  02:35a   31%|
|Sat  7| 06:24a  08:55p  14:30 | 10:09p  05:10a |      Set  03:10a   40%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun  8| 06:23a  08:56p  14:33 | 10:11p  05:08a |F Qtr Set  03:39a   50%|
|Mon  9| 06:21a  08:57p  14:35 | 10:12p  05:06a |      Set  04:03a   60%|
|Tue 10| 06:20a  08:58p  14:38 | 10:14p  05:05a |      Set  04:25a   69%|
|Wed 11| 06:19a  08:59p  14:40 | 10:15p  05:03a |      Set  04:45a   79%|
|Thu 12| 06:18a  09:01p  14:43 | 10:17p  05:02a |      Set  05:06a   87%|
|Fri 13| 06:16a  09:02p  14:45 | 10:18p  05:00a |      Set  05:28a   93%|
|Sat 14| 06:15a  09:03p  14:47 | 10:20p  04:59a |      Set  05:53a   98%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun 15| 06:14a  09:04p  14:49 | 10:21p  04:57a |      Set  06:25a  100%|
|Mon 16| 06:13a  09:05p  14:52 | 10:23p  04:56a |Full  Rise 10:13p   99%|
|Tue 17| 06:12a  09:06p  14:54 | 10:24p  04:54a |      Rise 11:33p   95%|
|Wed 18| 06:11a  09:07p  14:56 | 10:26p  04:53a |      Rise 12:43a   89%|
|Thu 19| 06:10a  09:08p  14:58 | 10:27p  04:51a |      Rise 01:40a   80%|
|Fri 20| 06:09a  09:09p  15:00 | 10:29p  04:50a |      Rise 02:23a   70%|
|Sat 21| 06:08a  09:11p  15:02 | 10:30p  04:49a |      Rise 02:56a   59%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun 22| 06:07a  09:12p  15:04 | 10:32p  04:47a |L Qtr Rise 03:22a   48%|
|Mon 23| 06:06a  09:13p  15:06 | 10:33p  04:46a |      Rise 03:44a   37%|
|Tue 24| 06:05a  09:14p  15:08 | 10:34p  04:45a |      Rise 04:03a   27%|
|Wed 25| 06:05a  09:15p  15:10 | 10:36p  04:44a |      Rise 04:22a   18%|
|Thu 26| 06:04a  09:16p  15:11 | 10:37p  04:43a |      Rise 04:42a   11%|
|Fri 27| 06:03a  09:16p  15:13 | 10:38p  04:42a |      Rise 05:03a    6%|
|Sat 28| 06:02a  09:17p  15:15 | 10:39p  04:41a |      Rise 05:27a    2%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun 29| 06:02a  09:18p  15:16 | 10:41p  04:40a |      Rise 05:56a    0%|
|Mon 30| 06:01a  09:19p  15:18 | 10:42p  04:39a |New   Set  09:56p    0%|
|Tue 31| 06:00a  09:20p  15:19 | 10:43p  04:38a |      Set  10:56p    2%|
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
* Nautical Twilight
** Moonrise or moonset, whichever occurs between sunrise and sunset

Generated using my LookingUp for DOS program.