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10/20/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

October 20, 2021 Leave a comment

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, October 20th. Today the Sun will be up for 10 hours and 44 minutes, setting at 6:49, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:06. The Moon, is full today, the Hunter’s Moon, and will rise at 7:07 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the southwestern evening twilight by 7:10 tonight. It will set at 8:44 pm. By 7:30 pm, Jupiter will be spotted in the south-southeastern sky. Jupiter should be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, and to its right. They will be visible for a while after midnight in the southwest, with Saturn setting first at 1:04 am, and Jupiter following at 2:24. Saturn’s rings are a beautiful sight in a telescope of even modest power, but the planet will appear tiny. In the morning sky, Mercury will be visible and low in the east-southeast by 7:15 am. It will reach its greatest separation from the Sun in six days.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in twilight

Venus seen in twilight at 7:10 pm, about 20 minutes after sunset tonight, October 20, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Full Hunters Moon rising

Full Hunter’s Moon rising at 7:11 this evening, October 20, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon at 7:30, about 40 minutes after sunset tonight, October 20, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Mercury and Arcturus in the morning twilight

Mercury and the star Arcturus in the morning twilight at 7:15 am, about 50 minutes before sunrise tomorrow morning, October 21, 2021. Don’t confuse the two. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic naked-eye planets_10/20/2021

Telescopic views of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening at 8 pm, October 20, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 22.70″, 53.7% illuminated; Saturn 17.08″, its rings 39.80″; Jupiter, 43.68″. Mercury at 7:15 am on the 21st and not plotted, 7.68″, 38.1% illuminated. The two Jovian moons transiting the face of the planet are usually not visible, though their shadows can be spotted. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on October 20, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 21st. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

10/18/2021 – Ephemeris – Jupiter is stationary today

October 18, 2021 Leave a comment

This is Ephemeris for Monday, October 18th. Today the Sun will be up for 10 hours and 50 minutes, setting at 6:52, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:03. The Moon, 2 days before full, will set at 6:49 tomorrow morning.

The planet Jupiter is stationary today after moving westward for the last four months, as the Earth passed it in our race around the Sun. And it will resume its normal prograde or eastward motion against the stars and constellations of the Zodiac. During this retrograde time it had seemed to move closer to Saturn. Now that it and Saturn are appearing to resume their eastward motion, Jupiter again will appear to open up the distance between them. The ancient Greeks had a devil of a time trying to model this behavior, because they started with two false premises. One, that the Earth was stationary in the center of the universe; and two, that the Sun, Moon, and planets moved in uniform circular motion because they were perfect.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Jupiter and Saturn retrograde loops in 2021

Jupiter and Saturn’s apparent motions seen against the constellation of Capricornus in 2021, including their retrograde loops. Click on the image to enlarge it. The tracks begin on the right. By the end of 2021 neither planet recovers all the eastern progress they lost in their retrograde loops. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

10/13/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

October 13, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, October 13th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 5 minutes, setting at 7:01, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:57. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 1:00 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the southwestern evening twilight by 7:20 tonight. It will set at 8:37 pm. By 7:45 pm, Jupiter will be spotted in the south-southeastern sky. The Jupiter should be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, and to its right. It will be above and left of the Moon tonight. They will be visible for a while after midnight in the southwest, with Saturn setting first at 1:31 am, and Jupiter following at 2:52. Saturn’s rings are a beautiful sight in a telescope of even modest power, but the planet will appear tiny. Jupiter’s 4 brightest moons are spread out, two on each side of the planet tonight. They might all be visible in binoculars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in twilight

Venus seen in twilight at 7:20 pm, about 20 minutes after sunset on October 13, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon at 7:45, about 45 minutes after sunset in this view to the south-southeast. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Slight gibbous Moon as it might appear tonight

The slight gibbous Moon as it might appear tonight in binoculars or small telescope. It appears here right side up as it would appear in the sky at 9 pm. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of the naked-eye planets

Telescopic views of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening at 9 pm, October 13, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 21.15″, 56.8% illuminated; Saturn 17.29″, its rings 40.27″; Jupiter, 44.63″. 9 pm is also the best time to find the Great Red Spot on Jupiter’s face. Io will be in transit of the face of Jupiter until 7:53 pm. After that, Io will be increasing its distance from the planet. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on October 13, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 14th. It looks like Mercury will be far enough from the Sun next week to spot in the morning. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

10/06/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

October 6, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, October 6th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 26 minutes, setting at 7:13, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:48. The Moon is new today, and won’t be visible.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the southwestern evening twilight by 7:45 tonight. It will set at 8:52 pm. By 8 pm, Jupiter will be spotted in the south-southeastern sky. The Jupiter should be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. They will be visible into the morning hours, with Saturn setting first at 1:58 am, and Jupiter following at 3:20. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical disk. Jupiter’s 4 brightest moons are spread out, three on one side, and one on the other. They might all be visible in binoculars tonight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 7:45 pm, about a half hour after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn at 8 pm

Jupiter and Saturn at 8 pm, about 45 minutes after sunset tonight, October 6, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of the naked-eye planets

Telescopic views of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening at 8 pm, October 6, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 19.81″, 59.8% illuminated; Saturn 17.48″, its rings 40.73″; Jupiter, 45.55″. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on October 6, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 7th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

09/29/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 29, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 29th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 47 minutes, setting at 7:26, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:39. The Moon, 1 day past last quarter, will rise at 12:40 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the southwestern evening twilight by 7:45 tonight. It will set at 8:59 pm. By 8 pm, Jupiter will be spotted in the southeastern sky. The Jupiter should be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. They will be visible into the morning hours, with Saturn setting first at 2:26 am, with Jupiter following at 3:49. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical disk. Jupiter’s four brightest moons are spread out, two on each side. They all might be visible in binoculars tonight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 7:45 pm, about a half hour after sunset tonight, September 29, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn in evening twilight

Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast at 8 pm. Created using Stellarium.

Waning crescent Moon

Low magnification view of the waxing crescent Moon as it would appear at 6:30 am tomorrow, September 30, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of the naked-eye planets

Telescopic views of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening at 8 pm, September 29, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 18.65″, 62.6% illuminated; Saturn 17.68″, its rings 41.18″; Jupiter, 46.41″. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 29, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 30th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

09/22/2021 – Ephemeris – Autumn starts this afternoon and a look at the naked-eye planets

September 22, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 22nd. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 9 minutes, setting at 7:39, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:31. The Moon, 2 days past full, will rise at 8:43 this evening.

Here on Earth, the season of fall will begin at 3:21 this afternoon. Let’s search for rest of the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the southwestern evening twilight by 8 o’clock tonight. It will set at 9:08 pm. By 8:15 pm, Jupiter and Saturn will be seen low in the southeastern sky. The brighter Jupiter will be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. They will be visible into the morning hours, with Saturn setting first at 2:55 am, with Jupiter following at 4:19. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical disk.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in twilight

Venus in twilight at 8 pm, or about 20 minutes after sunset, tonight, September 22, 2021. An animation showing its altitude at that time of 10 degrees (about the width of your fist held at arm’s length). Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Waning gibbous Moon, 15 minutes after rising

Waning gibbous Moon, about 15 minutes after rising as it might be visible in binoculars or small telescope. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of the naked-eye planets

Telescopic views of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening. Venus at 8 pm, Jupiter and Saturn at 10 pm, September 22, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 17.61″, and 65.3% illuminated; Saturn 17.86″, its rings 41.61″; Jupiter, 47.20″. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 22, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 23rd. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

09/15/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 15, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 30 minutes, setting at 7:52, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:23. The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 1:59 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the western evening twilight before 8:15 tonight. It will set at 9:19 pm. By 8:30 pm, Jupiter and Saturn will be seen low in the southeastern sky. The brighter Jupiter will be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. Both these planets will be to the left of the bright gibbous Moon. They will be visible for most of the night, with Saturn setting first at 3:24 am, with Jupiter setting at 4:50 tomorrow morning. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power, the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical spot. Most of Jupiter’s 4 brightest moons can even be spotted in binoculars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 8:15 tonight, about 20 minutes after sunset, September 15, 2021. Created using Stellarium.


Jupiter Saturn and the Moon at 8:30 tonight

Jupiter Saturn and the Moon at 8:30 tonight, about 40 minutes after sunset, September 15, 2021. Created using Stellarium.


Low magnification view of the Moon

Low magnification view of the Moon tonight. The large crater Clavius is seen at the south (bottom) of the Moon. The crater Copernicus is seen near the left edge of the Moon, the sunrise terminator. Created using Stellarium.

The naked-eye planets as seen in small telescopes

Telescopic view of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening. Venus at 8:30 pm, September 15, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 16.70″ 68% illuminated; Saturn 18.03″, its rings 42.00″; Jupiter, 47.88″. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).


Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 15, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 16th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

09/08/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 8, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 8th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 52 minutes, setting at 8:06, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:14. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 9:16 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the western evening twilight before 8:30 tonight. It will set at 9:41 pm. By 8:30 pm, Jupiter and Saturn will be seen low in the southeastern sky. The brighter Jupiter will be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. Both these planets will be visible for most of the night, with Saturn setting first at 3:53 am, with Jupiter setting at 5:21 tomorrow morning. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power, the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical spot. Most of Jupiter’s 4 brightest moons can even be spotted in binoculars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Vednus and the Moon in evening twilight

Venus and the Moon in evening twilight at 8:30 pm tonight, September 8, 2021. This is about 25 minutes after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The thin crescent Moon as it might appear with earth shine in binoculars at 8:30 pm tonight, September 8, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast

Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast at 8:30 pm, about a half hour after sunset tonight, September 8, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

The naked-eye planets as seen in small telescopes

Telescopic view of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening. Venus at 8:30 pm, and the other two at 10 pm, September 8, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 15.88″ 70% illuminated; Saturn 18.19″, its rings 42.36″; Jupiter, 48.43″. Jupiter’s moons will slowly approach the planet from our viewpoint overnight. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 8, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 9th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

09/01/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 1, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 1st. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 13 minutes, setting at 8:18, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:06. The Moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 1:57 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the western evening twilight before 9 tonight. It will set at 9:41 pm. By 9 pm, Jupiter and Saturn will be seen low in the southeastern sky. The brighter Jupiter will be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. Both these planets will be visible for most of the night, with Saturn setting first at 4:22 am, with Jupiter setting at 5:53 tomorrow morning. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power, the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical spot. Most of Jupiter’s 4 brightest moons can be spotted in binoculars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in twilight

Venus in twilight at 8:45 pm, about 1/2 hour after sunset tonight, September 1, 2021. Created with Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast 3 quarters of an hour after sunset

Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast about three quarters of an hour after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

Waning crescent binocular Moon

The waning crescent Moon as it might be seen in binoculars or low magnification telescope at 6 am tomorrow morning, September 2, 2021.
Created using Stellarium.

The naked-eye planets as seen in small telescopes

Telescopic view of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening. Venus at 9 pm, and the other two at 11 pm, September 1, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 15.16″, 73% illuminated; Saturn 18.32″, its rings 42.67″; Jupiter, 48.83″. Jupiter’s moons Io and Europa will slowly approach the planet over the morning hours. Io will be occulted by the planet around 4:05 am (08:05 UT). Europa will begin its transit across the face of the planet around 5:04 am (09:04 UT). The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts). Jovian satellite event times determined from Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 1, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 2nd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

Note: Mars and Mercury are too close to the direction of the Sun to be visible from Northern Michigan.  However, Mercury  will be easily visible far south of here and into the Southern Hemisphere.

 

08/25/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

August 25, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 25th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 8:31, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:58. The Moon, 3 days past full, will rise at 10:20 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus should be visible in the western evening twilight before 9 tonight. It will set at 9:53 pm. By 9 pm, Jupiter and Saturn will be seen low in the southeastern sky. The brighter Jupiter will be easy to spot at that hour. Saturn will be dimmer, but a bit higher and to its right. Both these planets will be visible for most of the night, with Saturn setting first at 4:52 am, with Jupiter setting at 6:26 tomorrow morning. Saturn’s rings can be seen in a spotting scope of about 20 power magnification. Though at that power, the rings won’t appear separated from the planet, so Saturn will look like an elliptical spot. Most of Jupiter’s 4 brightest moon can be spotted in binoculars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight tonight

Venus in evening twilight tonight, August 25, 2021 at 9 pm, about 1/2 hour after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn in the early evening

Jupiter and Saturn in the southeast at 9:30 pm tonight, August 25, 2021, about 45 minutes after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon tonight

The Moon as it might appear tonight in binoculars or a small telescope at 11:30 pm, about an hour after it rises tonight, August 25, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

The naked-eye planets as seen in small telescopes

Telescopic view of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening. Venus at 9:15 pm, and the other two at 11 pm, August 25, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 14.51″ 75% illuminated; Saturn 18.43″, its rings 42.93″; Jupiter, 49.06″. Jupiter’s moons Io and Ganymede will slowly separate after 11 pm. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on August 25, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 26th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.