06/13/2022 – Ephemeris – What’s a near rectilinear halo orbit?

June 13, 2022 Comments off

Since I wrote and recorded this program on June 5th, the launch date has been postponed from June 13th. No new launch date has, been selected, though the launch window extends through the 22nd for this month’s attempt.

This is Ephemeris for Monday, June 13th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 32 minutes, setting at 9:29, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 5:41 tomorrow morning.

Last Friday I talked about the CAPSTONE mission to a near rectilinear halo orbit of the Moon, which, when I recorded this, could launch as soon as today. Anyway, what is a near rectilinear halo orbit? And why is it so special? It is a long looping orbit that comes quite close to the Moon over its North Pole, and very far away over the South Pole of the Moon. Instead of going behind the Moon from the Earth’s perspective, the orbit will always be face-on to the Earth. It will require occasional tweaks to keep it that way, just like the James Webb Space Telescope needs occasional tweaks to keep it in orbit of the Earth-Sun L2 point. That way a lander, or base at the South Pole of the Moon, can keep in communication with the Lunar Gateway for all but a couple of hours each week. Why the South Pole? That’s where the water ice is!

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

NASA CAPSTONE pathfinder for gateway orbit

NASA CAPSTONE* pathfinder for gateway orbit is to be launched this year by Rocket Lab to prove out the near rectilinear orbit for the Lunar Gateway.

The orbit will pass 1,900 miles (3,000 km) above the Moon’s North Pole and out to 43,000 miles (70,000 km) above the South Pole. The period of such an orbit is about 6.5 days. Landing attempts at the South Pole of the Moon will begin as the lander departs the Orion spacecraft or the Lunar Gateway space station and begins its descent over the North Pole.

06/10/2022 – Ephemeris – The first Artemis mission: CAPSTONE

June 10, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Friday, June 10th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 30 minutes, setting at 9:27, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 3:52 tomorrow morning.

Launching, perhaps, as soon a Monday is the CAPSTONE Mission, which is part of the Artemis program to send the next man and first woman to the Moon. The Capstone mission is to check out the special near rectilinear halo orbit the Lunar Gateway space station, and the Human Landing Craft will be in when the Orion spacecraft arrives before landing. CAPSTONE is, of course, an acronym that explains its purpose, to achieve and navigate itself into this near rectilinear halo orbit. CAPSTONE is basically a CubeSat made of 12 4 by 4 inch (12 100 mm by 100 mm) cubes. It will be launched by Rocket Lab from New Zealand on their Electron rocket with their Proton upper stage. It will take 3 months to reach the Moon.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

CAPSTONE spacecraft

Artist’s impression of the CAPSTONE spacecraft at perilune, the closest point in its orbit, over the north pole of the Moon.

CAPSTONE's near rectilinear halo orbit of the Moon

CAPSTONE’s near rectilinear halo orbit of the Moon, which precesses to keep face on to the Earth during the lunar orbit of the Earth.

06/09/2022 – Ephemeris – Looking at the gibbous Moon tonight

June 9, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Thursday, June 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 29 minutes, setting at 9:27, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:29 tomorrow morning.

By tonight, the gibbous moon will be quite bright. At the moon’s left edge, just coming into sunlight, will be what looks like a large half crater at the edge of the lunar sea called Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Showers. That feature is Sinus Iridium, or Bay of Rainbows. The arc of its mountainous edge is rainbow shaped, but it is as colorless as the rest of the Moon. The crater Copernicus sports few shadows and appears mostly as a bright spot surrounded by its ray system of ejecta craters that appear bright when the sun is high in their sky. At the south end of the Moon are the lunar highlands, bright, rugged and covered by large, mostly very old craters. Largest of these craters is Clavius, named for Christophorus Clavius who, working for Pope Gregory XIII, devised the Gregorian Calendar we use today.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Gibbous Moon

Binocular Moon as it might appear tonight, June 9, 2022. Below, we’ll look closer to the terminator area of the Moon. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

Northern gibbous Moon terminator area

Northern gibbous Moon terminator area with labels for some prominent features. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas, LibreOffice and GIMP.

Southern gibbous Moon terminator area

Southern gibbous Moon terminator area with labels for some prominent features. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas, LibreOffice and GIMP.

Translations

Mare Frigoris – Sea of Cold
Mare Imbrium – Sea of Showers
Mare Nubium – Sea of Clouds
Montes Alpes – Alps Mountains
Montes Appinenninus – Apennines Mountains
Sinus Iridium – Bay of Rainbows

06/08/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 8, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 8th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 29 minutes, setting at 9:26, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 3:08 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, although Mercury may be too close to the Sun to be seen. It might just be visible low in the east-northeast after 5 am around mid-month. That’s at least for those as far north as we are. At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the south-southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, in the east-southeast are Mars and Jupiter. Mars is quite a bit dimmer than Jupiter. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the south-southeast. The naked-eye planets are arranged in the morning sky, in the same order as their distances from the Sun.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Waning gibbous Moon tonight

Waning gibbous Moon tonight with prominent features labeled. Created using Stellarium, GIMP and LibreOffice.

Morning planets at 5 am

Morning planets at 5 am tomorrow morning, June 9, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 79 degrees. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, June 9, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 13.10″, 80.3% illuminated; Saturn 17.60″, its rings 41.01″; Jupiter 38.23″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.63″ and is 86.8% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 8, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 9th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/07/2022 – Ephemeris – The Moon’s Straight Wall

June 7, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Tuesday, June 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 28 minutes, setting at 9:25, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 2:49 tomorrow morning.

Around the first quarter Moon there is, among all the circular formations on the Moon like craters, something that’s straight. Its name is Rupes Recta, better known as the Straight Wall. Tonight it’s a dark line seen near and parallel to the terminator, the sunrise line on the Moon, about a third of the way down from the center of the Moon’s disc to the edge. It looks like a cliff that’s 900 feet (300 meters) high and 67 miles (110 kilometers) long. It’s not. It is apparently a rectilinear fault, and its slope is only 7 degrees. It will disappear as the sun rises higher and illuminates the slope. It can be spotted in a small telescope, though it requires something generally larger and more powerful than a pair of binoculars. Near last quarter, the Straight Wall appears as a bright line.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Moon's Straight Wall locator

Moon’s Straight Wall locator, though it may not be visible at this magnification. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

Enlargement of the area of the Straight Wall

Enlargement of the area of the Straight Wall with labels blinking on and off. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas, Libreoffice, and GIMP.

Enlargement of the area of the Straight Wall near last quarter. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

06/06/2022 – Ephemeris – In June we spend our evenings in the twilight zone

June 6, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Monday, June 6th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 9:25, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, 1 day before first quarter, will set at 2:28 tomorrow morning

We spend our evenings after sunset during the months of June and July, pretty much in the twilight zone. Actually, it’s just twilight. There are three twilight periods: Civil, Nautical and Astronomical. In the evening, civil twilight lasts from sunset to when the Sun drops to 6 degrees below the horizon. The scene around is still quite bright, but car headlights still need to be on. Nautical twilight lasts until the Sun is 12 degrees below the horizon. Bright stars and the horizon are visible for sextant use. After that is astronomical twilight until the Sun is 18 degrees below the horizon, when the stars become more and more numerous. After that it’s officially dark, Moon permitting. This time of year we’re lucky to get three and a half hours of darkness.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Twilight example for June 6, 2022

Daylight, twilight, and dark example for June 6, 2022. This graph is centered on midnight. Light blue is daylight, while the three darker shades of blue denote the three twilight periods of civil, nautical and astronomical. The yellow lines show when the Sun, Moon and planets are visible. Dark of night is relegated only to the morning hours, thanks to the season, daylight saving time and our location 43 minutes west of our standard time meridian. The chart is produced by the app Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Categories: Concepts, Observing, Twilight

06/03/2022 – Ephemeris – GTAS Astronomy meeting tonight explores women of science

June 3, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Friday, June 3rd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 23 minutes, setting at 9:23, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:58. The Moon, halfway from new to first quarter, will set at 1:11 tomorrow morning.

Tonight at 9 pm, the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will have an in-person meeting at Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory. The meeting will also be available via Zoom. The program will be presented by Becky Shaw. Her presentation will be An Encore to the Women of Science. Becky’s programs have always feature historic women of science, from Hypatia of ancient Alexandria to Cecilia Payne’s historic discovery of the elemental makeup of stars 100 years ago. If it’s clear, there will be a star party following the meeting. The observatory is located south of Traverse City off Birmley Road, between Garfield and Keystone roads. A Zoom link will be available at gtastro.org before the meeting.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

This meeting will mark the 40th anniversary of the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society. I hear someone might be bringing 40 cupcakes to celebrate.

Three of the female astronomers and planetary scientists I follow on Twitter are:

Alessondra Springmann @sondy, Planetary scientist
Dr. Katie Mack, @AstroKatie, Theoretical astrophysicist, Author of The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking)
Dr Carolyn Porco, @carolynporco, Planetary scientist

There are lots more in all the science disciplines.

06/02/2022 – Ephemeris – What’s an ephemeris?

June 2, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, June 2nd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 22 minutes, setting at 9:22, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:59. The Moon, 3 days past new, will set at 12:34 tomorrow morning.

Yesterday, I was too busy on this program to mention that that program was the 47th anniversary of the Ephemeris program and was embarking on its 48th orbit of the Sun. At this juncture, you might be wondering: What’s an ephemeris? According to Wikipedia: Quote “In astronomy and celestial navigation, an ephemeris (plural: ephemerides; from Latin ephemeris, meaning ‘diary’, from the Greek, … meaning ‘diary, or journal’) gives the positions of… astronomical objects… at a given time or times. Historically, positions were given as printed tables of values, given at regular intervals of date and time.” enquote. My tables are now databases which I generate for the year during the prior December from published algorithms. I will show all on my blog today: (You are already here). I used to have to interpolate values from printed ephemerides for the first 5 or so years of the program.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

An Ephemeris Example – Comet 73P-B/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 nuclear fragment B

A sample of an ephemeris

Here’s an ephemeris for Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 nuclear fragment B from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL) Horizons system. The listing has been truncated for width. Click on it to enlarge it.

R.A. is right ascension – East-west position in the sky, like longitude on the Earth, only it’s in hours, minutes and seconds.  One hour = 15 degrees.

DEC is declination – North-south position, in the sky, exactly like latitude on the Earth in degrees, minutes and seconds.

(a-apparent) means that the above coordinates are based on where the vernal equinox point in the sky is at that date and time, and for the observer’s location. Since I didn’t specify one, it’s the center of the Earth.

T-mag – Predicted total magnitude of the comet.  Magnitudes are like golf scores.  The higher magnitude, the dimmer the object.  It’s really, really dim.

N-mag – Predicted magnitude of the nucleus. No estimate is made here.

r – Distance from the Sun in terms of Astronomical Units (AU).  1 AU is Earth’s mean distance from the Sun.

rdot – The change in r.  It’s in kilometers per second.  If negative, it’s moving toward the Sun.

For more information on how I produce ephemerides for this program, go here: https://bobmoler.wordpress.com/2019/01/22/

06/01/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 1, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 1st. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 21 minutes, setting at 9:21, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:59. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 11:49 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, although Mercury is too close to the Sun to be seen, and might just be visible low in the east-northeast after 5 am around mid-month. That’s at least for those as far north as we are. At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the south-southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, in the east-southeast are Mars and Jupiter. Mars is quite a bit dimmer than Jupiter. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the south-southeast. Though Mercury will enter the evening sky first, it won’t have great visibility. Saturn will enter the evening sky August 14th.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon in binoculars tonight

The two-day-old Moon as it might be seen in binoculars tonight, June 1, 2022. Earth shine might illuminate the Moon’s night side. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Morning planets at 5 am

Morning planets at 5 am tomorrow morning, June 2, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 70 degrees. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, June 2, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 13.58″, 78.3% illuminated; Saturn 17.40″, its rings 40.54″; Jupiter 37.49″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.46″ and is 87.2% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts), planet information from Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 1, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 2nd. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

Update on the Tau Herculid meteor shower of May 31st.

The meteor shower was rather weak. I saw one during an hour and a half of observing, slowly moving over the Big Dipper. The sky was “clear”, but there was a haze to it. It definitely wasn’t crystal clear. I’ve heard from others who had a bit more success.

05/31/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s preview the sunny month of June

May 31, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Tuesday, May 31st. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 19 minutes, setting at 9:20, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:00. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 10:56 this evening.

Let’s preview June skies. There will be a lot of sun in June and very little night. The daylight hours will increase a bit from 15 hours and 21 minutes Tomorrow to 15 hours and 34 minutes on the 21st, retreating back to 15 hours 31 minutes at month’s end. The altitude of the Sun above the southern horizon at local noon will hover around 68 to 69 degrees. Local noon, when the Sun is actually due south, will occur at about 1:43 p.m. Summer begins on the 21st at 5:14 am, when the Sun reaches its farthest north. The actual amount of nighttime will be quite short, mostly due to the length of daylight, but also because twilight lasts much longer than average because the Sun sets at a shallow angle. On the 21st, there’s theoretically only 3 ½ hours of total darkness if the Moon wasn’t up.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

June Evening Star Chart

June Evening Star Chart

Star Chart for June 2022 (11 p.m. EDT June 15, 2022). Created using my LookingUp program. Click on image to enlarge.

The planets and stars are plotted for the 15th at 11 p.m. EDT in the evening and 4 a.m. for the morning chart. These are the chart times. Note that Interlochen/Traverse City is located approximately 45 minutes behind our time meridian, West 75° longitude. (An hour 45 minutes behind our daylight saving time meridian during EDT). To duplicate the star positions on a planisphere you may have to set it to 1 hour 45 minutes earlier than the current time.
Note the chart times of 11 p.m. and 4 a.m. are for the 15th. For each week before the 15th, add ½ hour (28 minutes if you’re picky). For each week after the 15th, subtract ½ hour, or 28 minutes. The planet positions are updated each Wednesday on this blog. For planet positions on dates other than the 15th, check the Wednesday planet posts on this blog for weekly positions.

June Morning Star Chart

Star Chart June Morning

Star Chart for June mornings, 2022 (4 am EDT, June 15, 2022). Created using my LookingUp program. Click on image to enlarge.

For a list of constellation names to go with the abbreviations, click here.

  • Pointer stars at the front of the bowl of the Big Dipper point to Polaris, the North Star.
  • Leaky dipper drips on Leo
  • Follow the arc of the handle of the Big Dipper to the star Arcturus, and
  • Extend like a spike to Spica,

Twilight Limits, Nautical and Astronomical

EDT
Morning Twilight Evening Twilight Dark Night Moon
Date Astro. Nautical Nautical Astro. Start End Illum.
2022-06-01 3h44m 4h42m 22h47m 23h46m 23h49m 3h44m 0.07
2022-06-02 3h42m 4h42m 22h48m 23h47m 3h42m 0.12
2022-06-03 3h41m 4h41m 22h49m 23h49m 0h34m 3h41m 0.19
2022-06-04 3h40m 4h40m 22h50m 23h50m 1h11m 3h40m 0.27
2022-06-05 3h39m 4h39m 22h51m 23h52m 1h41m 3h39m 0.36
2022-06-06 3h38m 4h39m 22h52m 23h53m 2h07m 3h38m 0.46
2022-06-07 3h37m 4h38m 22h53m 23h54m 2h29m 3h37m 0.56
2022-06-08 3h36m 4h38m 22h54m 23h56m 2h49m 3h36m 0.66
2022-06-09 3h35m 4h37m 22h55m 23h57m 3h09m 3h35m 0.76
2022-06-10 3h34m 4h37m 22h55m 23h58m 3h29m 3h34m 0.85
2022-06-11 3h34m 4h37m 22h56m 23h59m 0.92
2022-06-12 3h33m 4h36m 22h57m 0h00m 0.98
2022-06-13 3h33m 4h36m 22h57m 0h01m 1
2022-06-14 3h32m 4h36m 22h58m 0h02m 0.99
2022-06-15 3h32m 4h36m 22h59m 0h02m 0.95
2022-06-16 3h32m 4h36m 22h59m 0h03m 0.89
2022-06-17 3h32m 4h36m 22h59m 0h04m 0h04m 0h18m 0.81
2022-06-18 3h32m 4h36m 23h00m 0h04m 0h04m 0h56m 0.71
2022-06-19 3h32m 4h36m 23h00m 0h05m 0h05m 1h25m 0.6
2022-06-20 3h32m 4h36m 23h00m 0h05m 0h05m 1h49m 0.49
2022-06-21 3h32m 4h36m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 2h10m 0.39
2022-06-22 3h32m 4h37m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 2h29m 0.29
2022-06-23 3h33m 4h37m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 2h48m 0.21
2022-06-24 3h33m 4h37m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 3h09m 0.13
2022-06-25 3h34m 4h38m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 3h32m 0.08
2022-06-26 3h34m 4h38m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 3h34m 0.03
2022-06-27 3h35m 4h39m 23h01m 0h05m 0h05m 3h35m 0.01
2022-06-28 3h36m 4h39m 23h01m 0h04m 0h04m 3h36m 0
2022-06-29 3h37m 4h40m 23h00m 0h04m 0h04m 3h37m 0.01
2022-06-30 3h38m 4h41m 23h00m 0h03m 0h03m 3h38m 0.04

The twilight calendar was generated using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts), with some corrections.

See my blog post: Twilight Zone for the definitions of the different periods of twilight here: https://bobmoler.wordpress.com/2018/09/27/.

NASA Calendar of Planetary Events

Jun  1  We            Venus: 36.5° W
     1  We   6:32 pm  Moon North Dec.: 26.9° N
     1  We   9:14 pm  Moon Apogee: 406,200 km
     3  Fr   1:42 am  Moon-Pollux: 2.4° N
     4  Sa   3:17 am  Moon-Beehive: 4° S
     7  Tu  10:48 am  First Quarter
    12  Su   6:02 am  Moon Descending Node
    14  Tu   7:52 am  Full Strawberry Moon (Super Moon)
    14  Tu   7:21 pm  Moon Perigee: 357,400 km
    15  We   6:59 am  Moon South Dec.: 26.9° S
    16  Th  10:59 am  Mercury Elongation: 23.2° W
    18  Sa   8:22 am  Moon-Saturn: 4.3° N
    20  Mo  11:11 pm  Last Quarter
    21  Tu   5:14 am  Summer Solstice
    21  Tu   9:31 am  Moon-Jupiter: 2.9° N
    22  We   2:05 pm  Mercury-Aldebaran: 2.9° N
    22  We   2:16 pm  Moon-Mars: 1° N
    22  We   8:53 pm  Venus-Pleiades: 5.7° S
    25  Sa   3:10 am  Moon Ascending Node
    25  Sa   5:27 pm  Moon-Pleiades: 3.9° N
    26  Su   4:11 am  Moon-Venus: 3° S
    28  Tu  10:52 pm  New Moon
    29  We  12:06 am  Moon North Dec.: 26.9° N
    29  We   2:08 am  Moon Apogee: 406,600 km
    30  Th  10:45 pm  Venus-Aldebaran: 4.1° N
Jul  1  Fr            Venus: 29.6° W

Sky Events Calendar by Fred Espenak and Sumit Dutta (NASA’s GSFC),
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/SKYCAL/SKYCAL.html.

Sun and Moon Rising and Setting Events

LU                  Ephemeris of Sky Events for Interlochen/TC
June, 2022    Local time zone: EDT
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| DATE |  SUN     SUN  DAYLIGHT|   TWILIGHT*    |MOON  RISE OR    ILLUM |
|      |  RISE    SET    HOURS |  END    START  |PHASE SET** TIME FRACTN|
+=======================================================================+
|Wed  1| 06:00a  09:21p  15:21 | 10:44p  04:37a |      Set  11:49p    6%|
|Thu  2| 05:59a  09:22p  15:22 | 10:45p  04:36a |      Set  12:34a   11%|
|Fri  3| 05:59a  09:23p  15:23 | 10:46p  04:35a |      Set  01:11a   17%|
|Sat  4| 05:58a  09:23p  15:24 | 10:47p  04:35a |      Set  01:41a   25%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun  5| 05:58a  09:24p  15:26 | 10:48p  04:34a |      Set  02:06a   34%|
|Mon  6| 05:58a  09:25p  15:27 | 10:49p  04:33a |      Set  02:28a   44%|
|Tue  7| 05:57a  09:25p  15:28 | 10:50p  04:33a |F Qtr Set  02:49a   54%|
|Wed  8| 05:57a  09:26p  15:29 | 10:51p  04:32a |      Set  03:08a   64%|
|Thu  9| 05:57a  09:27p  15:29 | 10:52p  04:32a |      Set  03:29a   74%|
|Fri 10| 05:57a  09:27p  15:30 | 10:53p  04:31a |      Set  03:52a   83%|
|Sat 11| 05:56a  09:28p  15:31 | 10:53p  04:31a |      Set  04:19a   91%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun 12| 05:56a  09:28p  15:32 | 10:54p  04:31a |      Set  04:54a   97%|
|Mon 13| 05:56a  09:29p  15:32 | 10:55p  04:30a |      Set  05:41a  100%|
|Tue 14| 05:56a  09:29p  15:33 | 10:55p  04:30a |Full  Rise 10:22p  100%|
|Wed 15| 05:56a  09:30p  15:33 | 10:56p  04:30a |      Rise 11:27p   96%|
|Thu 16| 05:56a  09:30p  15:34 | 10:56p  04:30a |      Rise 12:17a   91%|
|Fri 17| 05:56a  09:30p  15:34 | 10:57p  04:30a |      Rise 12:55a   82%|
|Sat 18| 05:56a  09:31p  15:34 | 10:57p  04:30a |      Rise 01:25a   73%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun 19| 05:56a  09:31p  15:34 | 10:57p  04:30a |      Rise 01:49a   62%|
|Mon 20| 05:57a  09:31p  15:34 | 10:58p  04:30a |L Qtr Rise 02:09a   51%|
|Tue 21| 05:57a  09:32p  15:34 | 10:58p  04:30a |      Rise 02:28a   41%|
|Wed 22| 05:57a  09:32p  15:34 | 10:58p  04:31a |      Rise 02:48a   31%|
|Thu 23| 05:57a  09:32p  15:34 | 10:58p  04:31a |      Rise 03:08a   22%|
|Fri 24| 05:58a  09:32p  15:34 | 10:58p  04:31a |      Rise 03:31a   15%|
|Sat 25| 05:58a  09:32p  15:34 | 10:58p  04:32a |      Rise 03:59a    9%|
+------+-----------------------+----------------+-----------------------+
|Sun 26| 05:58a  09:32p  15:33 | 10:58p  04:32a |      Rise 04:32a    4%|
|Mon 27| 05:59a  09:32p  15:33 | 10:58p  04:33a |      Rise 05:13a    1%|
|Tue 28| 05:59a  09:32p  15:32 | 10:58p  04:33a |New   Set  09:44p    0%|
|Wed 29| 06:00a  09:32p  15:32 | 10:58p  04:34a |      Set  10:32p    1%|
|Thu 30| 06:00a  09:32p  15:31 | 10:57p  04:34a |      Set  11:11p    3%|
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------+
* Nautical Twilight
** Moonrise or moonset, whichever occurs between sunrise and sunset

Generated using my LookingUp for DOS program.

Categories: Ephemeris Program, Month preview Tags: