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Posts Tagged ‘Apollo’

07/13/2017 – Ephemeris – Constellations of the Summer Triangle I: Lyra the harp

July 13, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Thursday, July 13th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 16 minutes, setting at 9:26, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:10. The Moon, 3 days before last quarter, will rise at 12:02 tomorrow morning.

Very high up in the eastern sky at 11 p.m. can be found a bright star just above a small, narrow, but very distinctive parallelogram of stars. They are the stars of the constellation Lyra the harp. The bright star is Vega, member of the Summer Triangle and one of the twenty one brightest first magnitude stars. Vega is actually the 5th brightest night-time star. The harp, according to Greek mythology, was invented by the Greek god Hermes. The form of the harp in the sky, is as he had invented it: by stretching strings across a tortoise-shell. Hermes gave it to his half-brother Apollo, who in turn gave it to the great musician Orpheus. The Sun’s motion with respect to most stars around it is towards the vicinity of Lyra.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Summer Triangle July 5, 2012 at 11 p.m. Created using Stellaruim and The Gimp.

The Summer Triangle. Created using Stellarium.

Annimated Lyra finder chart

Animated Lyra finder chart. The lyre image not supplied by Stellarium but is from The World’s Earliest Music by Hermann Smith, a Project Gutenberg E book, figure 60, captioned “The Chelys or Greek Tortoiseshell Lyre”. Image created using Stellarium and GIMP.

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04/27/2017 – Ephemeris – A constellation story on why crows are black

April 27, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, April 27th.  The Sun rises at 6:38.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 4 minutes, setting at 8:42.  The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 10:16 this evening.

The small constellation of Corvus the crow is located low in the south-southeast at 10:30 this evening. It’s made of 5 dim stars, but the pattern is a distinctive distorted box with two stars at the upper left marking that corner. To the right is a fainter constellation of a thick stemmed goblet called Crater. Both appear above the long constellation of Hydra the water snake who is slithering just above the southern horizon.. In Greek mythology Corvus, then white, was the god Apollo’s pet. Apollo once bid Corvus to take a cup and fetch him some water. Corvus however dallied and waited for an unripe fig to ripen. Corvus grabbed a snake and returned with a story as to how the snake had delayed him.  The angry Apollo turned the crow and all crows to this day black.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Corvus, Crater and Hydra

Corvus, Crater and Hydra finder chart for 10:30 p.m. April 27, 2017. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

07/25/2016 – Ephemeris – Hermes’ Harp

July 25, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, July 25th.  The Sun rises at 6:21.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 54 minutes, setting at 9:16.  The Moon, 1 day before last quarter, will rise at 12:34 tomorrow morning.

High up in the eastern sky at 11 p.m. can be found a bright star just north of a small, narrow, but very distinctive parallelogram of stars.  They are the stars of the constellation Lyra the harp.  The bright star is Vega, one of the twenty-one brightest stars, first magnitude stars.  Vega is actually the 5th brightest night-time star. The harp, according to Greek mythology, was invented by the Greek god Hermes.  The form of the harp in the sky, is as he had invented it: by stretching strings across a tortoise shell.  Hermes gave it to his half-brother Apollo, who in turn gave it to the great musician Orpheus.  In binoculars, near Vega, two stars appear together.  They barely appear to the unaided eye as one star, called Epsilon Lyrae.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Lyra

Lyra as a tortoise shell harp. Created using Stellarium and free clip art.

Closeup on Vega and Epsilon Lyrae. Created using Stellarium.

Closeup on Vega and Epsilon Lyrae. Created using Stellarium.

04/28/2016 – Ephemeris – The adventures of Corvus, Apollo’s pet crow

April 28, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, April 28th.  The Sun rises at 6:36.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 8 minutes, setting at 8:44.   The Moon, 1 day before last quarter, will rise at 2:20 tomorrow morning.

The small constellation of Corvus the crow is located low in the south at 11 this evening. It’s made of 5 dim stars, but the pattern is a distinctive distorted box with two stars at the upper left marking that corner. To the right is a fainter constellation of a thick stemmed goblet called Crater. Both appear above the long constellation of Hydra the water snake who is slithering just above the southern horizon.. In Greek mythology Corvus, then white, was the god Apollo’s pet. Apollo once bid Corvus to take a cup and fetch him some water. Corvus however dallied and waited for a green fig to ripen. Corvus grabbed a snake and returned with a story as to how the snake had delayed him.  The angry Apollo turned the crow and all crows to this day black.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Corvus the crow, Crater the cup and Hydra the water snake

Corvus the crow, Crater the cup and Hydra the water snake along with Jupiter and the other spring stars at 10 p.m. April 28, 2016. Created using Stellarium.

07/15/2014 – Ephemeris – The constellation of Lyra the harp

July 17, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, July 15th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 13 minutes, setting at 9:24.   The moon, half way from full to last quarter, will rise at 11:19 this evening.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 6:12.

Very high up in the eastern sky at 11 p.m. can be found a bright star just north of a small, narrow, but very distinctive parallelogram of stars.  They are the stars of the constellation Lyra the harp.  The bright star is Vega, one of the twenty one brightest first magnitude stars.  Vega is actually the 5th brightest night-time star. The harp, according to Greek mythology, was invented by the Greek god Hermes.  The form of the harp in the sky, is as he had invented it: by stretching strings across a tortoise shell.  Hermes gave it to his half-brother Apollo, who in turn gave it to the great musician Orpheus.  The sun has a motion with respect to most stars around it. Its direction is towards the vicinity of Lyra.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Lyra

Lyra as a tortoise shell harp. Created using Stellarium and free clip art.

 

 

 

06/30/2014 – Ephemeris – The celestial snake handler

June 30, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, June 30th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 30 minutes, setting at 9:31.   The moon, 3 days past new, will set at 11:14 this evening.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 6:01.  |   The red star Antares shines in the south at 11 p.m. In the constellation of Scorpius.  In the area of sky above and a little to the left lies a large constellation of faint stars called Ophiuchus, the serpent bearer.  The constellation shape is like a large bell, which reminds me of the head, shoulders and arms of a fellow that’s holding the snake-like a weight lifter pulling up a heavy bar bell.  The serpent he’s holding is Serpens, the only two-part constellation in the heavens.  The head rises to Ophiuchus’ right and the tail extends up to the left.  In legend Ophiuchus was a great physician, educated by the god Apollo, and the centaur Chiron, also found in the stars as Sagittarius, now rising below and left of him.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Ophiuchus and Serpens July 10, 2012 at 11 p.m.. Created using Stellarium.

Ophiuchus and Serpens at 11 p.m.. Created using Stellarium.

04/28/2014 – Ephemeris – The legend of the constellation of Corvus the crow

April 28, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, April 28th.  The sun rises at 6:37.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 6 minutes, setting at 8:43.   The moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 6:53 tomorrow morning.

The small constellation of Corvus the crow is located low in the south at 10:30 this evening. It’s made of 5 dim stars, but the pattern is a distinctive distorted box with two stars at the upper left marking that corner. To the right is a fainter constellation of a thick stemmed goblet called Crater. Both appear above the long constellation of Hydra the water snake who is slithering just above the southern horizon.  In Greek mythology Corvus, then white, was the god Apollo’s pet. He once bid Corvus to take a cup and fetch him some water. Corvus however dallied and waited for a green fig to ripen. Corvus grabbed a snake and returned with a story on how the snake had delayed him.  The angry Apollo turned the crow and all crows to this day black.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Corvus the crow, Crater the cup and Hydra the water snake

Corvus the crow, Crater the cup and Hydra the water snake along with the other spring constellations ay 10 p.m. April 28, 2014. Created using Stellarium.