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Posts Tagged ‘Artemis I’

10/06/2022 – Ephemeris – Artemis I rescheduled

October 6, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, October 6th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 7:14, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:48. The Moon, 3 days before full, will set at 4:52 tomorrow morning.

Artemis 1 was going to launch on September 27th, But Hurricane Ian had other plans, so the rocket was trundled back to the Vertical Assembly Building. There, a battery or components of the auto destruct mechanism had to be swapped out before they attempted to launch again. All rockets launched from the US are required to be equipped with a destruct package to blow up the rocket if it veers off course, to not endanger lives on the ground. There are other tweaks, including charging or replacing batteries in all the CubeSats that are on board. The next possible launch period runs from November 12th to the 27th, with four blackout dates within that period. The weather should be better, being the tail end of hurricane season.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Artemis I November launch calendar

Artemis I November launch calendar. Dates in green are possible launch dates. I’m not sure, but red dates are also forbidden because the Orion Capsule will experience more than 90 minutes in shadow at a time. It’s powered by solar panels. Light green dates allow a long mission of 1 1/2 orbits of the Moon in the distant retrograde orbit (DRO). The dark green dates can only have 1/2 a DRO. Source: NASA.

09/26/2022 – Ephemeris – The DART spacecraft will attempt to deflect an asteroid tonight, Artemis I launch postponed

September 26, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Monday, September 26th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 57 minutes, setting at 7:32, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:35. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 8:07 this evening.

Tonight at 7:14 pm EDT (23:14 UTC), NASA’s DART spacecraft will collide with the tiny asteroid Dimorphos, which is orbiting the somewhat larger asteroid Didymos. They are potentially hazardous asteroids. The idea is to see what effect the collision has on the orbit of Dimorphos as it orbits Didymos at four tenths of a mile an hour. Trailing DART is an Italian CubeSat LiciaCube (pronounced LEE-cha-cube), which was launched from DART more 15 days ago to witness the collision. DART is an acronym for Double Asteroid Redirection Test, part of the Planetary Defense Program. Earth based radio and optical telescopes will assess if and how much the collision alters the orbit of Dimorphos. LICIAcube will return images of the collision, crater and the other side of Dimorphos. NASA will air it live on their channels.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Unlike the Artemis I launch, this event cannot be postponed. It will either hit Dimorphos at 7:14 pm or miss forever.

NASA DART

Graphic on NASA’s DART mission to crash a small spacecraft into a mini-asteroid to change its trajectory as a test for any potentially dangerous asteroids in the future. Click on the image to enlarge it. Credit: AFP / AFP (Agence France-Presse)

A Note from EarthSky.org:

If you want to watch the event live, coverage begins at 6 p.m. EDT (22 UTC) on September 26, 2022, on NASA’s website. You can also watch it via Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Artemis I news

The Artemis I launch, scheduled for Tuesday, September 27, has been postponed due to the threat from tropical storm Ian.

08/26/2022 – Ephemeris – Monday the launch window opens up for Artemis I

August 26, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Friday, August 26th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 31 minutes, setting at 8:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:59. The Moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 7:00 tomorrow morning.

The first day of the Artemis I launch window is Monday morning. NASA will have three attempts to launch between August 29th and September 5th. There is also a daily launch window of up to two hours. If a launch is scrubbed one day, it will be at least two days before they can try again. Artemis I is an uncrewed mission, that will enter a large orbit of the Moon, and go around it one half or one and a half times before returning to the Earth. Major investigations that will take place in the Orion capsule are how well it would protect the astronauts from the Sun’s radiation and cosmic rays outside the Earth’s protective magnetosphere. The first launch window opens up at 8:33 am Eastern Daylight Time, August 29, 2022.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Simulated Artemis launch from Launch Pad 39B

Artist’s rendering of the Artemis launch from Launch Pad 39B as it would be seen from offshore. Click on the image to enlarge it. Credit NASA.

Artemis I mission overview

Major mission milestones. Click on the image to enlarge it. Credit: NASA

Categories: Artemis Program, NASA Tags: ,

08/09/2022 – Ephemeris – Artemis I mission could launch by the end of the month

August 9, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Tuesday, August 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 19 minutes, setting at 8:57, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:39. The Moon, 2 days before full, will set at 4:15 tomorrow morning.

NASA has announced the launch date for the Artemis 1 uncrewed mission to the Moon. It’s August 29th. Or, in NASAspeak, NET (not earlier than) August 29th. Being the first launch of a new vehicle, they probably won’t launch on that day, due to encountered problems. Their second wet dress rehearsal still fell a few seconds short of the programmed end time, just before the main engines would be lit. If Artemis can’t launch on the 29th, the next date to go will be September 2nd, The four-day wait is because in that period the Orion capsule would spend too much time in the Earth’s shadow and without sunlight for its solar panels, depleting its batteries, on its way out to the Moon. The next opportunity after that would come on the 5th. Then a long wait til the 20th.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Simulated Artemis launch from Launch Pad 39B

Simulated Artemis launch from Launch Pad 39B as it would be seen from offshore. Credit NASA.

Artemis I mission overview

Major mission milestones. Click on the image to enlarge. Credit: NASA