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Posts Tagged ‘Cassiopeia’

09/27/2022 – Ephemeris – Finding the constellation of Perseus the hero

September 27, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Tuesday, September 27th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 54 minutes, setting at 7:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:37. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 8:28 this evening.

Close to the horizon, but rising in the northeast in the evening, is the constellation of Perseus the Greek hero, holding as his prize the severed head of Medusa. To me, the stars don’t seem to match the figure in the stars. It’s either the Greek letter pi (π) tilted to the left or the cartoon roadrunner running up the sky. Perseus’ brightest star is Mirfak in the middle of the top of the letter π, or back of the roadrunner. Using a pair of binoculars to look towards Mirfak, one can see many more stars, just below naked eye visibility near it. It’s a very loose star cluster called the Alpha (α) Persei Association, α Persei being a catalog designation for Mirfak. And Mirfak is actually in the association. Unlike some bright stars, who are just foreground stars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

For my take on the mythology featuring Perseus, see The Great Star Story of Autumn. It’s way too long for my short radio program. For Hollywood’s treatment of the story, see Clash of the Titans.

Perseus finder animation

Perseus finder using the animated GIF to show the star field, constellation lines and names, and Perseus as art. Cassiopeia is included as a means to find the dimmer Perseus below it on autumn evenings. Algol, another important star and the second-brightest star of Perseus, is also labeled. I normally cover it around Halloween, but if you can’t wait, type Algol in the search box at the upper right. Created using Stellarium, LibreOffice Draw, and GIMP.

Alpha Persei Association

The Alpha Persei Association. The brightest star is Mirfak (Alpha Persei). This is a small section of a photograph taken February 18, 2017, Canon EOS Rebel T5, 121 seconds, f/3.5, 18 mm fl., ISO 3200. Credit Bob Moler.

09/19/2022 – Ephemeris – Finding the constellation Cepheus

September 19, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Monday, September 19th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 19 minutes, setting at 7:45, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:27. The Moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 1:30 tomorrow morning.

There’s a faint constellation in the northeast above the W shaped constellation of Cassiopeia. It’s a nearly upside down church steeple of a constellation called Cepheus the king, and husband of queen Cassiopeia. Cepheus’ claim to modern astronomical fame is that one of its stars, Delta (δ) Cephei, is the archetype for the important Cepheid variable stars. Delta is the bottom most of a trio of stars at the right corner of the constellation. In the early 20th century, Henrietta Leavitt discovered that Cepheids in the nearby galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud varied in brightness with a period that was related to their average brightness. This meant that Cepheids could be used as standard candles to measure the great distances to other galaxies.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation looking in the northeast at 9 pm or about an hour after sunset in mid-September. Also labeled is Delta (δ) Cephei. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Delta_Cephei_lightcurve

Light Curve of Delta Cephei. The pulsation period is 5.367 days. Note the Magnitude vertical axis, the lower the magnitude the brighter the star is. Blame that on the Greek astronomer Hipparchus, 2nd century BC. It’s like golf scores; the lower the score, the better the golfer, and for magnitudes, the brighter the star. Credit: Thomas K Vbg – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13887639.

09/15/2022 – Ephemeris – Finding Cassiopeia this time of year

September 15, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, September 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 31 minutes, setting at 7:53, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:22. The Moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 10:30 this evening.

In the northeastern sky is a letter W shaped constellation of Cassiopeia, the queen of Greek myth. I can’t say Cassiopeia is rising in the northeast, because it never sets for us in northern Michigan. This time of year it skirts above the northern horizon during the daytime. One of Cassiopeia’s claims to historical astronomical fame is that it’s the location of Tycho’s Star, a supernova discovered in 1572 by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, the last of the great astronomers prior to the invention of the telescope. Tycho was able to prove that the temporary phenomenon was actually a star in the heavens, disproving the Greek notion that the heavens were changeless and perfect. The Chinese had already known that, calling them Guest Stars.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Cassiopeia finder animation

Cassiopeia finder animation for 10 pm tonight, September 15th. One cannot miss the distinctive W. Created using Stellarium.

Tycho's Supernova 1574A

Tycho’s Supernova 1574A, as simulated in Stellarium for mid-November 1572.

Tycho's Supernova remnant seen in x-rays

Tycho’s Supernova remnant, seen in x-rays by the orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory. Credit: NASA / Chandra

09/28/2021 – Ephemeris – Andromeda, a damsel in distress

September 28, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Tuesday, September 28th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 50 minutes, setting at 7:28, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:38. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 11:46 this evening.

In the east at 9 this evening can be found a large square of stars, the Great Square of Pegasus the flying horse. The square is standing on one corner. What looks like its hind legs stretching to the left from the left corner star is another constellation, Andromeda the chained princess. She is seen in the sky as two diverging curved strings of stars that curve upward. She was doomed due to her mother, Queen Cassiopeia’s boasting, which angered the god Poseidon. She was rescued by the hero Perseus, a nearby constellation, riding his steed Pegasus. Andromeda’s claim to astronomical fame is the large galaxy seen with the naked-eye just above the upper line of stars. The Great Andromeda Galaxy is two and a half million light years away.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Andromeda finder animation

Andromeda finder animation surrounded by the other constellations in her story, except the monster, which will rise later. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Andromeda Galaxy finder chart

Great Andromeda Galaxy finder chart. This image shows the galaxy almost to its fullest extent. In the finder animation above, the galaxy looks pretty much as it would to the naked eye. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Astronomers often refer to this galaxy as M 31 for short. It was the 31st entry in Charles Messier’s catalog of objects that could be confused as being comets by comet hunters like himself. It was added in 1764. He didn’t care what these fuzzy objects were, just that they didn’t move against the background stars. Actually, M 31 is in the background. The stars are in the foreground, in our Milky Way Galaxy.

 

09/09/2021 – Ephemeris – The constellation of Cassiopeia the Queen

September 9, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, September 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 49 minutes, setting at 8:04, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:16. The Moon, 3 days past new, will set at 9:40 this evening.

Tonight, check out the crescent Moon, with Venus below left of it. Cassiopeia is a constellation shaped like the letter W seen in the northeast these evenings. In Greek mythology, she was the queen of Ethiopia. She was very beautiful and very boastful of that fact. She even compared her beauty with that of the sea nymphs, daughters of the sea god Poseidon. Papa was not amused. So Cassiopeia’s daughter, the Princess Andromeda, was made to suffer for it. Poseidon sent a sea monster, Cetus, to ravage the coastal cities of the country. The only way to stop it was to sacrifice Andromeda to the monster. Andromeda and Cetus are constellations we’ll meet in the coming weeks. We’ve already met Pegasus, the flying horse, rising in the east. And we are yet to meet the hero, Perseus.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and te Moon in evening twilight

Venus and the Moon in evening twilight, about a half hour after sunset tonight, September 9, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Cassiopeia finder animation

Cassiopeia finder animation looking northeast in mid-September, an hour and a half after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

 

09/07/2021 – Ephemeris – The constellation of Cepheus the king

September 7, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Tuesday, September 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 55 minutes, setting at 8:07, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:13. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 8:53 this evening.

There’s a faint constellation in the northeast above the W shaped constellation of Cassiopeia. It’s a nearly upside down church steeple of a constellation called Cepheus the king, and husband of queen Cassiopeia. Cepheus’ claim to modern astronomical fame is that one of its stars, Delta (δ) Cephei, is the archetype for the important Cepheid variable stars. Delta is the bottom most of a trio of stars at the right corner of the constellation. In the early 20th century, Henrietta Leavitt discovered that Cepheids in the nearby galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud varied in brightness with a period that was related to their average brightness. This meant that Cepheids could be used as standard candles to measure the great distances to other galaxies.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation looking in the northeast at 9-10 pm or about an hour after sunset. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Delta Cephei finder for September at 9-10 pm, looking northeast. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Chart).

Delta_Cephei_lightcurve

Light Curve of Delta Cephei. The pulsation period is 5.367 days. Note the Magnitude vertical axis, the lower the magnitude the brighter the star is. Blame that on the Greek astronomer Hipparchus, 2nd century BC. It’s like golf scores, the lower the score, the better the golfer. Credit: Thomas K Vbg – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13887639.

08/30/2021 – Ephemeris – “W”

August 30, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Monday, August 30th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 19 minutes, setting at 8:22, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:04. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 12:26 tomorrow morning.

Rising higher each evening in the northeastern sky is a group of stars that make the pattern of the letter W. It is the constellation of Cassiopeia the queen. It is one of the more recognizable star patterns. From our latitude here in Northern Michigan, it is circumpolar, meaning that it never sets. Though, the best time to see it is in the autumn and winter, when it’s highest in the sky. It is opposite the Big Dipper from Polaris, the north star. In fact, a line drawn from any of the handle stars of the Big Dipper through Polaris will reach Cassiopeia. So as the Big Dipper descends in the northwestern sky now, Cassiopeia ascends in the northeast. They change places in winter and spring as the Big Dipper ascends in the northeast.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Big Dipper-Cassiopeia animation

Animation showing the juxtaposition of Cassiopeia and the Big Dipper from Polaris, the North Star. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

10/08/2020 – Ephemeris – A lady with a not so hidden jewel

October 8, 2020 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, October 8th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 19 minutes, setting at 7:09, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:51. The Moon, 1 day before last quarter, will rise at 11:09 this evening.

The stars of the constellations Andromeda the chained princess look like they’re supposed to be the hind legs of Pegasus the flying horse which is high in the southern sky above Mars at 9 p.m. Andromeda is high in the southeast She is seen in the sky as two diverging curved strings of stars that curve to the left and up from the upper leftmost star of the Great Square of Pegasus. Her predicament was caused by her boastful mother Cassiopeia, and the wrath of the god Poseidon. She was rescued by the hero Perseus, a nearby constellation, riding his steed Pegasus. Andromeda’s claim to astronomical fame is the large galaxy barely visible to the unaided eye just above the upper line of stars, the Great Andromeda Galaxy 2.5 million light years away.

The event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Andromeda and M31 animated finder

Andromeda animated finder, including the Great Andromeda Galaxy. I’ve added Cassiopeia that some folks use to find the galaxy. I start with the leftmost star of the Great Square of Pegasus that connects to Andromeda. I count off two star on the lower curve because they are brighter than the upper curve. Then count two stars up. Next to that top star is a little smudge. That is the core of the Great Andromeda Galaxy. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

The Great Andromeda Galaxy (M31). Image taken by Scott Anttila.

The Great Andromeda Galaxy (M31) and two of its satellite galaxies M31 (left) and M110. Image taken by Scott Anttila.

 

09/18/2020 – Ephemeris – A closer look at Cepheus the king’s most famous star

September 18, 2020 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Friday, September 18th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 20 minutes, setting at 7:46, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:27. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 8:52 this evening.

There’s a faint constellation in the northeast above the W shaped constellation of Cassiopeia. It’s a nearly upside down church steeple of a constellation called Cepheus the king, and husband of queen Cassiopeia. Cepheus’ claim to astronomical fame is that one of its stars, Delta (δ) Cephei, is the archetype for the important Cepheid variable stars. Delta is the bottom most of a trio of stars at the right corner of the constellation. In the early 20th century Henrietta Leavitt discovered that Cepheids in the nearby galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud varied in brightness with a period that was related to their average brightness. This meant that Cepheids could be used as standard candles to measure the great distances to other galaxies.

The event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation looking in the northeast at 9 pm or about an hour after sunset in mid-September. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Delta Cephei (circled) finder for mid-September at 9 pm or about an hour after sunset looking northeast. The brighter stars are marked by their Bayer Greek letters. Numerical designations are Flamsteed numbers. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Chart).

Delta_Cephei_lightcurve

Light Curve of Delta Cephei. The pulsation period is 5.367 days. Credit: ThomasK Vbg – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13887639

09/17/2020 – Ephemeris – Finding Cassiopeia the queen and Cepheus the king

September 17, 2020 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Thursday, September 17th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 24 minutes, setting at 7:48, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:25. The Moon is new today, and won’t be visible.

The stars of the autumn skies are slowly replacing the summer stars from the east. Look midway up in the northeastern sky in the evening and you can find the W shaped constellation of Cassiopeia the queen. Cassiopeia is so far north that it never sets for us in Michigan. It is opposite the pole star Polaris from the handle of Big Dipper. There’s a dim star that appears above the middle star of the W which turns it into a very crooked backed chair, Cassiopeia’s throne. Above and left of Cassiopeia is a dim upside down church steeple shaped constellation of Cepheus the king, her husband. The Milky Way flows through Cassiopeia toward the northeastern horizon. She is a character in an autumn star story with five other constellations.

For my retelling of the Greek myth that links these autumn constellations click here.

The event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation

Cassiopeia and Cepheus finder animation looking in the northeast at 9 pm or about an hour after sunset in mid-September. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.