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Posts Tagged ‘Deneb’

074/26/2016 – Ephemeris – The flying swan and Northern Cross

July 26, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, July 26th.  The Sun rises at 6:22.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 52 minutes, setting at 9:15.  The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 1:09 tomorrow morning.

Fairly high in the east at 11 p.m. Is the constellation of Cygnus the swan, flying south through the Milky Way.  It is also called the Northern Cross.  At the left, the tail of the swan or the head of the cross is the bright star Deneb, one of the stars of the Summer Triangle.  The next star right is Sadr the intersection of the body and the wings of the swan seen in flight, or the intersection of the two pieces of the cross.  There are two or three stars farther to the right that delineate the swan’s long neck or upright of the cross, that ends with the star Alberio in the beak of the swan or foot of the cross.  It takes a telescope, but Alberio splits into a beautiful blue and gold binary star.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

CygnusTheSwan Created using Stellarium.

Cygnus the Swan Created using Stellarium.

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06/23/2016 – Ephemeris – Tis the season to view the Summer Triangle

June 23, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, June 23rd.  Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 9:32, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:58.  The Moon, 3 days past full, will rise at 11:43 this evening.

Now that summer is here, the asterism or informal constellation called the Summer Triangle can be seen in the east as it gets dark.  Highest of the three bright stars is Vega in the constellation Lyra the harp, whose body is seen in a narrow parallelogram nearby.  The second star of the triangle is Deneb lower and left of Vega, It appears dimmer than Vega because its is by far the most distant of the three.  The third star of the Summer Triangle is seen farther below and right of Vega.  It is Altair in Aquila the eagle, and the closest.  Altair is 16.7 light years away, Vega is 25 light years while Deneb may be a whopping 2600 light years away.   With a light year at 6 trillion miles.  That’s mind boggling to think in miles at least.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Summer Triangle July 5, 2012 at 11 p.m. Created using Stellaruim and The Gimp.

The Summer Triangle. Created using Stellarium and The Gimp.

11/20/2015 – Ephemeris – Finding the bright stars of November

November 20, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, November 20th.  The Sun will rise at 7:46.  It’ll be up for 9 hours and 24 minutes, setting at 5:10.   The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 2:17 tomorrow morning.

The Moon is beginning to brighten up the sky making constellation spotting somewhat difficult, so I thought we’d look for the brightest stars.  High in the west are the three stars of the Summer Triangle.  At the bottom in the southwest is Altair, the first of these to set.  A bit north of west the brightest, Vega.  Highest in the west is Deneb, which won’t officially set for those Interlochen northward.  Low in the south is the loneliest star Fomalhaut.  In the northeast is the winter star Capella, which also doesn’t set for the IPR listener area, but spends summer nights hiding behind hills and trees in the north.  Low in the east is the last of our bright stars, Aldebaran in Taurus the bull, which will be playing hide and seek with the Moon next week.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Autumn bright stars

The bright first magnitude stars of autumn shown for 8 p.m. November 20, 2015. If you are closer to your time meridian, we’re 43 minutes behind ours, you will see two more bright stars in the east: Red Betelgeuse and blue-white Rigel. Created using Stellarium.

10/06/2015 – Ephemeris – Deneb our home-town star

October 6, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, October 6th.  The Sun will rise at 7:46.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 7:14.   The Moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 2:36 tomorrow morning.

We, here in Traverse City, Michigan have a pretty unique relation to the bright star Deneb, as is any location near 45 degrees north latitude.  Tonight at 9:23  Deneb will be three-quarters of a degree due north of the zenith.  Due north means that it’s on our meridian, a line you may remember from your school days.  For astronomers it passes from the north point on the horizon, through the overhead point or zenith to the south point on the horizon.  Also due to our latitude Deneb is circumpolar, meaning that it doesn’t quite set on a clean northern horizon.  Deneb and 56 other stars are used for celestial navigation, which is still taught in case the GPS system goes down due to solar or enemy action.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Deneb nearly at the zenith

Deneb nearly at the zenith from Traverse City. Created using Cartes du Ciel.

Deneb nearly at the horizon

Deneb is close to the horizon due north. Created using Cartes du Ciel.

08/04/2015 – Ephemeris – Is it a swan or a cross?

August 4, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, August 4th.  The Sun rises at 6:32.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 32 minutes, setting at 9:04.   The Moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 11:33 this evening.

High in the east northeast as it gets dark flies the constellation of Cygnus the swan.  This constellation is also known as the Northern Cross.  The cross is seen lying on its side with the bright star Deneb at the head of the cross to the left.  The rest of the cross is delineated in the stars to the right.  As a swan, Deneb is the tail, the stars of the crosspiece of the cross are part of the leading edges of the wings as Cygnus flies south through the Milky Way.  There are faint stars that also define the tips and trailing edges of its wings.  It is a very good portrayal of a flying swan, like the mute swans we see on the wing in our area.  This is the form the Greek god Zeus took to seduce the maiden Leda in the Leda and the swan affair, out of whose union Pollux was born, who was the twin of Castor, both of whom are also in the stars as the constellation Gemini.  In Cygnus we are looking toward the direction that the Sun and the Earth are traveling as we orbit the center of the Milky Way.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

CygnusTheSwan Created using Stellarium.

Cygnus The Swan Created using Stellarium.

Note for telescope owners:  The star that appears in the eye of the swan image above is Alberio (β Cygni), which splits into a beautiful binary star, whose component  stars are blue and gold.  It takes a bit more magnification than a pair of binoculars provides.

Note also the mythological citation in the program was omitted from the broadcast version due to time constraints.

07/27/2015 – Ephemeris – Deneb, the dimmest of the Summer Triangle stars. But is it really?

July 27, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, July 27th.  The Sun rises at 6:23.  It’ll be up for 14 hours and 51 minutes, setting at 9:14.   The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 3:36 tomorrow morning.

This evening when it gets dark the bright star Deneb in Cygnus the swan will be high  in the east northeast.  Deneb is the dimmest star of the summer triangle.  Of the other stars of the triangle, Vega is very high in the east, while Altair is lower in the southeast.  While Deneb’s apparent magnitude, or brightness as seen from earth, makes it the dimmest of the three bright stars, Deneb’s vast distance of possibly 2,600 light years makes it over 100 times the distance of Vega.  If brought as close as Vega, Deneb would be almost as bright as the full moon.  It is as bright as two hundred thousand suns.  It apparently has run out of hydrogen in its core.  Once a blue super giant star, it’s currently evolving through the white supergiant stage.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Summer Triangle July 5, 2012 at 11 p.m. Created using Stellaruim and The Gimp.

The Summer Triangle. Created using Stellarium and The Gimp.

Deneb & North American Nebula

One of my old photographs of Deneb and the North American Nebula digitized from a slide.

H-R diagram

The Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of star luminosity vs. surface temperature. Note that Deneb is at the top center, while the Sun is lower on the main sequence. Credit: European Southern Observatory (ESO).

07/16/2015 – Ephemeris – The Summer Triangle is the sign of the season

July 16, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, July 16th.  Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 12 minutes, setting at 9:25.   The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 9:32 this evening, and tomorrow the Sun will rise at 6:13.

We’re almost a month into summer, and the asterism or informal constellation called the Summer Triangle can be seen midway up the sky in the east as it gets dark.  Highest of the three bright stars is Vega in the constellation Lyra the harp, whose body is seen in a narrow parallelogram nearby.  The second star of the triangle is Deneb lower and left of Vega, It appears dimmer than Vega because it is by far the most distant of the three.  The third star of the Summer Triangle is seen farther below and a right of Vega.  It is Altair in Aquila the eagle, and the closest.  Altair is 16.5 light years away, Vega is 27 light years while Deneb is so far away that it’s distance is in some doubt and may be 2,600 light years away.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Summer Triangle. Created using Stellarium.

Summer Triangle. Created using Stellarium.