Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Earliest Sunrise’

06/15/2021 – Ephemeris – Today we had the earliest sunrise of the year

June 15, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Tuesday, June 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 2 days before first quarter, will set at 1:29 tomorrow morning.

Today is the day of the year with the earliest sunrise, which in the Interlochen/Traverse City area is 6:56 am. We are 5 days before the summer solstice, the longest day in terms of sunshine hours. With the Sun nearing its maximum angle above the celestial equator, the projection of the Earth’s equator on the sky it cuts those longitude timelines quicker because they are closer together than at the equator. This is counters somewhat the Sun’s speed slowing down as the Earth is reaching the farthest point in its orbit. The latest sunset will occur about June 26th, a span of 11 days. In December the span between the earliest sunset and latest sunrise because of the Sun’s increased speed, by being nearly at its closest to us, is 24 days.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Sun crossing time lines

How the Sun’s declination affects how rapidly it appears to cross time lines (meridians)

Analemma components animated

These graphs show how the earth’s orbit eccentricity and tilt of the Earth’s axis (obliquity) affect sundial time keeping vs. actual clocks. This also affects sunrise and sunset times. The figure 8 in the lower right is the analemma, sometimes seen on old Earth globes, a graphical representation of the equation of time (sundial corrections from apparent to mean solar time).

Earliest and Latest Sunrises and Sunsets

Table of Earliest and Latest Sunrises and Sunsets during the year for Interlochen/Traverse City area of Michigan. This table was created for 2017, 4 years ago. However, the instant of the summer solstice occurred just after midnight on June 21st, That instant slipped back into just before midnight in 2021. This is why we use the Gregorian calendar. The slide is corrected by having 3 out of four century years being normal years.

06/15/2020 – Ephemeris – Now is the date of the earliest sunrise and it isn’t even summer yet

June 15, 2020 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Monday, June 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 3:30 tomorrow morning.

Today, give or take a day is the date of the earliest sunrise. The latest sunrise was about January 2nd, leaving only about 165 days for the transition of three hours, 24 minutes and since we still have five days to the longest day. The sunset change rate is a lot more leisurely. It has to do with the tilt of Earth’s axis and its slightly elliptical orbit. It’s why sundials don’t keep proper time. Though most sundials appear to be decorative and are not set up correctly anyway. Besides sundials can’t cope with time zones, and daylight time unless they are specially built for a particular location. Anyway the latest sunset will be on the 26th, 200 days since the earliest sunset, on December 9th, last year.  The sunset retreat to December 9th will take 165 days, and the sunrise advance will take 200 days until next January 2nd next year.

The event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

06/15/2018 – Ephemeris – Earliest sunrise and a look at Venus

June 15, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, June 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 11:25 this evening.

Today saw the earliest sunrise of the year at 5:56 a.m. We’re 6 days from the summer solstice.

The two day old Moon tonight will appear below and to the right of Venus. Tomorrow night it will have moved to be left and above Venus. This weekend it will be fun to look at Venus and the Moon in binoculars or a small telescope. In a small telescope Venus, though small is definitely not round. It has a gibbous phase and appears 75% illuminated by the Sun. It’s still a bit farther than the Sun, at 109 million miles (175 million km). By the end of October it will come to less than a quarter that distance from us and be invisible in the Sun’s glare. Its phase will get skinnier as its size grows in our telescopes until then.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and the Moon

Venus and the Moon tonight June 15, 2018 at 10:30 p.m. Created using Stellarium.

Venus apparent sizes

Comparison of apparent sizes of the planet Venus, tonight June 15 and near Inferior conjunction. I was 2 days late using my memory. The date will be October 26th. Created using Stellarium.

06/14/2016 – Ephemeris – Tomorrow is the earliest sunrise of the year

June 14, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Flag Day, Tuesday, June 14th.  Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56.  The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:22 tomorrow morning.

Tomorrow morning’s sunrise is the earliest sunrise of the year.  Sunrises of the next few days will stay within the same minute.  The bottoming out of the earliest sunrise is a slow affair, but the advance of the sunrise times will accelerate in the coming weeks.  We are still nearly two weeks from the latest sunset on the 26th.  That means that the summer solstice, the first day of summer is near, on the 20th.  The reason for the uneven sunrise and sunset peaks is due to a combination of the Earth’s axial tilt and the Earth’s elliptical orbit which is too complicated to explain here.   These times of sunrise and sunset are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area.  I have a link for other locations and times on bobmoler.wordpress.com.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Here is the link to the calendar page on my Ephemeris website.

06/15/2015 – Ephemeris – The earliest sunrise

June 15, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, June 15th.  Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30.   The Moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 6:19 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the Sun will rise at 5:56.

This is the day of the earliest sunrise.  We are still six days from the summer solstice, that day the Sun stays up the longest. And 11 days from the latest sunset.  I could be off a day since I don’t calculate sunrise and sunset times to the second.  I use the standard formula for these computations, which, among other things assumes that the horizon is the sea horizon.  If you’re standing on the bluffs overlooking Lake Michigan, sunset would be slightly later than one seen down on the shore, and for the Sleeping Bear Dunes or Empire Bluff, your sunset would be 2 minutes later that Traverse City or Interlochen anyway because that’s west of them.  At the latitude of 45 degrees the rise and set times are 1 minute later for each 12 and a half miles west you are.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The discussion turned from sunrises to sunsets.  Well, sunsets are a bigger deal this side of the state.  I suppose that if I lived in Alpena or Rogers City, I’d be more interested in sunrises.  The timing difference for the rising and setting of celestial objects depends on the longitude one is versus the longitude of the position for which it is calculated, as long as one stays at roughly the same latitude.  The times for this program are for a position roughly half way between Interlochen and Traverse City.  Full disclosure:  It’s the Moler homestead.  Back, when I started this program in 1975, it was an era I call BC.  Before Computers, well before personal computers.  I used the rising and setting tables from the Royal Canadian Astronomical Society’s Observer’s Handbook for the year in question, adjusting for longitude.  I climbed op on my rooftop to verify the times several times a year.  That was back when my house wasn’t surrounded by trees.

In the sky east or west, what we call longitude on the Earth is marked not in degrees, but in hours, minutes and seconds.  Since 360 degrees or Earth’s rotation equals 24 hours, one hour equals 15 degrees, and each degree equals 4 minutes.  In Traverse City, near 45 degrees north latitude,  The longitude lines are closer than at the equator.  They are 71% that of the equatorial separation.  Working it out, each minute of rotation equates to 12.31 miles.  The 12 1/2 miles is close enough for radio, and besides I had calculated it a looooong time ago and was pulling it off the top of my head.  I recalculated it just now.

Any change time in the rising and setting of objects for persons north or south of the standard position depends on the object’s declination (latitude in the sky) north of south of the celestial equator, so the calculation isn’t as simple.

06/16/2014 – Ephemeris – Dates of the earliest sunrise and latest sunset

June 16, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, June 16th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:29.   The moon, half way from full to last quarter, will rise at 12:11 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:56.

Yesterday saw the earliest sunrise for the year.  My sunrise times will start to show a change on Thursday.  The day-to-day change in sunrise times are now a few seconds.  The summer solstice, or longest day will be this Saturday, and the latest sunset won’t occur until next week Thursday.  The reason these dates don’t coincide has to do with the tilt of the earth’s axis and the earth’s slightly elliptical path around the sun.  Actually the disparity between these dates is more pronounced at the winter solstice when the Earth is closer to the sun and moving faster.  Yup, the sun is farther away now than it was in December.  Actually we’re moving slower now, so summer lasts a few days longer than winter.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.