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Posts Tagged ‘Eclipse glasses’

08/15/2017 – Ephemeris – Looking for safe eclipse glasses? Good luck.

August 15, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Tuesday, August 15th. The Sun rises at 6:45. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 2 minutes, setting at 8:47. The Moon, 1 day past last quarter, will rise at 1:28 tomorrow morning.

Only six days before the big solar eclipse event. Are you ready. If you decide to project the Sun’s image, good for you. I’ll talk about that method on Thursday. However if you want to view the eclipse with eclipse glasses and you haven’t gotten them yet, beware there are fake eclipse glasses out there. The is a list of reputable manufacturers and chains that sell them at the American Astronomical Society website at aas.org. Chains that are supposed to sell the genuine article are 7-Eleven, Best Buy, Lowe’s, Toys “R” Us, and Wal-Mart. Not all stores carry them, or have them in stock. Locally Enerdyne in Suttons Bay does carry them, but again could be sold out. Call first. Around the Grand Traverse Area the eclipse will be visible from 1 to 3:40 p.m. on the 21st.  On Thursday I’ll explain how to project the Sun safely.  No wonky filters needed.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

News note:  Amazon recalls suspect eclipse glasses

From PBS:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/amazon-recalls-potentially-hazardous-solar-eclipse-glasses/

The danger at looking at the Sun without proper filter

The danger with looking at the Sun without proper filter. Credit: University of Waterloo.

 

08/14/2017 – Ephemeris – Safe ways to view the eclipse

August 14, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Monday, August 14th. The Sun rises at 6:44. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 4 minutes, setting at 8:49. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 12:46 tomorrow morning.

It is one week to the Great American Eclipse, next Monday August 21st. Whether you’re heading out to the path of totality, or staying here it is imperative that you view the Sun safely. Solar filters may be purchased from some reputable stores. But there are some unsafe solar filters being sold out there. Beware. Also never use eclipse glasses to view the Sun with binoculars. The concentrated sunlight coming out of the eyepiece will burn through the plastic of the solar filter in an instant. The best method is to project the Sun’s image with a pinhole in a box or place a mirror in an envelope with a quarter-inch or so hole in it, and project the Sun on the shady side of a building. There’s plenty of Internet links at http://www.gtastro.org.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Two pinhole solar projection methods

Two pinhole solar projection methods. Credit NASA.

The danger at looking at the Sun without proper filter

The danger at looking at the Sun without proper filter. Credit: University of Waterloo.