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Posts Tagged ‘Egypt’

02/28/2022 – Ephemeris – Ancient Egypt’s most important star

February 28, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Monday, February 28th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 7 minutes, setting at 6:29, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:20. The Moon, 2 days before new, will rise at 7:17 tomorrow morning.

The Ancient Egyptian agricultural year began with the flooding of the Nile, which was announced by the heliacal rising of the brightest nighttime star, Sirius. A heliacal rising is the first appearance of a star in the morning twilight after disappearing in evening twilight some months before. The Greeks called the star Sothis, while the ancient Egyptians called the star Sopdet. The heliacal rising would occur on July 20th had our calendar been in use back then. The relationship between the summer solstice and the heliacal rising of Sothis, 29 days later, stayed the same for nearly three millennia, from at least 2900 BCE to 12 CE, despite precession* of the Earth’s axis moving the Sun from the middle of the constellation Leo at the summer solstice to the western edge of Cancer one and a half constellations west. Sopdet was personified by a goddess, who was the consort to Sah, who is what they called Orion.

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The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EST, UT – 5 hours). They may be different for your location.

* Precession of the equinoxes. The slow, 26,000 year wobble of the Earth’s axis which causes the Earth, most of the time, to not have a pole star. We’re lucky to live at a time to have a bright star within a degree of the north celestial pole. That star is, of course, Polaris. Precession also changes the point in the sky, along the ecliptic and zodiac, where the Sun appears on the first day of spring, or any season. These points move westward along the ecliptic (the plane of the earth’s orbit of the Sun) one degree every 72 years.

Addendum

The Egyptian used the heliacal rising of Sirius as a signal that the flooding of the Nile was imminent, starting their agricultural year. The Greeks called the star Sothis, while the Egyptians themselves called it Sopdet, a goddess, and consort of the god Sah, our Orion.
Part of my presentation, December 2021 of Ancient Astronomy of the Egyptians and Babylonians.

02/07/2017 – Ephemeris – Sirius: an important star in history

February 7, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, February 7th.  The Sun will rise at 7:53.  It’ll be up for 10 hours and 6 minutes, setting at 6:00.  The Moon, 3 days before full, will set at 5:53 tomorrow morning.

The brightest star-like object in the evening sky is Sirius, also known as the Dog Star.  It also is the brightest night-time star in our skies period.  Tonight at 9 p.m. it’s located in the southeastern sky.  The Dog Star name comes from its position at the heart of the constellation Canis Major, the great dog of Orion the hunter.  The three stars of Orion’s belt tilt to the southeast and point to Sirius.  The name Sirius means ‘Dazzling One’, a reference to its great brilliance and twinkling.  Its Egyptian name was Sothis, and its appearance in the dawn skies in late June signaled the flooding of the Nile, and the beginning of the Egyptian agricultural year.  Sirius owes much of its brightness to the fact that it lies quite close to us, only about 8 light years away.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Heliacal rising of Sirius

A simulation of the heliacal rising of Sothis (Sirius) with the Egyptian Pyramids circa 2000 BC.  Note that Sirius is just visible to the right of the nearest Pyramid. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

A heliacal rising is the first appearance of a star or planet in the morning after disappearing weeks or months before in the evening twilight.

01/11/2013 – Ephemeris – Sirius the Dog Star

January 11, 2013 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, January 11th.  The sun will rise at 8:17.  It’ll be up for 9 hours and 6 minutes, setting at 5:23.  The moon is new today, and won’t be visible.

The brightest star-like object in the evening sky is Jupiter high in the south around 9 p.m.  The second brightest star-like object is Sirius, also known as the Dog Star.  It also is the brightest night-time star in our skies period.  Tonight at 9 p.m. it’s located low in the south southeastern sky.  The Dog Star name comes from its position at the heart of the constellation Canis Major, the great dog of Orion the hunter.  The three stars of Orion’s belt tilt to the southeast and point to Sirius.  The name Sirius means ‘Dazzling One’, a reference to its great brilliance and twinkling.  Its Egyptian name was Sothis, and its appearance in the dawn skies in late June signaled the flooding of the Nile, and the beginning of the Egyptian agricultural year.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Sirius, Jupiter and the winter stars

Sirius, Jupiter and the winter stars and constellations at 9 p.m. Created using Stellarium.