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Posts Tagged ‘GTAS meeting’

09/05/2014 – Ephemeris – Supernovae and the Moon this weekend

September 5, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, September 5th.  The sun will rise at 7:09.  It’ll be up for 13 hours and 2 minutes, setting at 8:11.   The moon, half way from first quarter to full, will set at 4:07 tomorrow morning.

Tonight the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will hold their monthly meeting at he Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory at 8 p.m. featuring Dr. David Penney, who will talk about Supernovae, the brightest, at optical wavelengths anyway explosions in the universe.  These will either completely destroy a star or leave a neutron star or black hole remnant.  At 9 p.m. there will be a star party featuring the Moon, Saturn and Mars.  The observatory is located on Birmley road.  On Saturday the society will celebrate International Observe the Moon Night with telescopes set up on the 200 block of Front street in Traverse City.  That event starts around 9 p.m., but only if it’s clear.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

SN1987A

Remnant of SN1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud, 160,000 light years away taken by the Hubble telescope’s WFPC2 camera on three occasions in 1994 and 1995. The outer rings are light echos of the explosions ionizing clouds ejected thousands of years before. Credit NASA.

SN 2014J

Supernova 2014J in nearby galaxy M82, 12 million light years away. Credit NASA/Swift/P. Brown, TAMU.

06/06/2014 – Ephemeris – Astronomy activities this weekend in the Grand Traverse Region

June 6, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, June 6th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 26 minutes, setting at 9:24.   The moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 2:33 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

The Grand Traverse Astronomical Society, or GTAS, has a busy weekend.  At 8 p.m. the regular meeting at Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory features Dr. David Penney with his presentation of “The Rare Earth”.  At 9 p.m. at the observatory will be a star party until 11 p.m.  On Saturday the GTAS will have their telescopes at The Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore Philip A. Hart Visitors Center in Empire for viewing the sun from 4 to 6 p.m.  Then at 9 the GTAS will deploy their telescopes at the Dune Climb for an evening with the planets.  The Dunes events will be contingent on the weather.  Due to the lateness of the sunset it will be about 10 p.m. before any planets are spotted.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

01/03/2014 – Ephemeris – Astronomy events in the Grand Traverse Region tonight.

January 3, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, January 3rd.  The sun will rise at 8:19.  It’ll be up for 8 hours and 55 minutes, setting at 5:14.   The moon, 2 days past new, will set at 8:32 this evening.

We have a big night ahead.  At 1 a.m. the Earth will be closest to the Sun at perihelion.  In the morning hours the Quadrantid meteor shower will reach peak.  Before that the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers observatory on Birmley Road south of Traverse City starting at 8 p.m.  The program will be given by Richard Kuschell, who will talk about “Aristotle’s Big Mistake”.  Afterward, starting at 9 p.m. there will be a star party.  If its clear the winter wonders will be visible including the planet Jupiter and the Great Orion Nebula, the closest star nursery to us.  The meeting is free to the public.  There will be another program given during the star party.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Quadrantid meteor shower radiant at 1:30 a.m.

Quadrantid meteor shower radiant at 1:30 a.m.

Great Orion Nebula in Orion's sword. My old photograph.

Great Orion Nebula in Orion’s sword. My old photograph.  What you’ll see will actually be better than this except our eyes will not perceive the red color.  It will look gray or greenish at best.

 

 

06/07/2013 – Ephemeris – Learn about telescopes and observe the heavens this weekend.

June 7, 2013 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, June 7th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 9:25.   The moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 6:06 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

This will be a busy weekend for anyone wanting to view the heavens.  First the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will hold its monthly meeting at 8 p.m. tonight at the Rogers Observatory.  It will be a program about how to use telescopes.  The session will be conducted by Rod Cortright of the Northern Michigan Astronomy Club.  This will be followed by a star party at 9 p.m. where the featured attractions will be the planets Mercury, Venus and Saturn if its clear.  Tomorrow night, that’s Saturday night there will be a star party at Sleeping Bear Dunes Pierce Stocking Drive, Stop number 3 starting at 9 p.m.  Please park at Picnic Mountain, just before stop 3.  The Dunes star party will take place if it’s clear or partly cloudy.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

04/05/2013 – Ephemeris – Astronomy meeting and a star party tonight.

April 5, 2013 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, April 5th.  The sun will rise at 7:15.  It’ll be up for 12 hours and 59 minutes, setting at 8:15.   The moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 5:06 tomorrow morning.

Trixie and Kevin Pickard will preset a program this evening entitled Heavenly Signs at this evening’s meeting of the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society at Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory starting at 8 p.m.  Trixie has been one of our members since she was in high school.    Her main interest has been the manned space program.  But I am assured that this topic is not about that.  Starting at 9 p.m. Is our March star party at the observatory.  Highlights, if its clear will be the planet Jupiter and the wonders of the winter sky including the Great Orion Nebula.  Towards the end of the evening Saturn will rise.  It will be rather low in the sky and fuzzy.  But it is Saturn after all.  All are welcome.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.