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Posts Tagged ‘Hercules’

06/14/2018 – Ephemeris – The mighty hero Hercules in the sky

June 14, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Flag Day, Thursday, June 14th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:29, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 10:27 this evening.

Orion, the hard luck Greek hunter gets a splashy constellation in the winter sky, but the greatest hero of all, Hercules, gets a dim group of stars on the border between the spring and summer stars. At 11 p.m. Hercules is high in the southeast. It is located above and right of the bright star, Vega in the east. Hercules’ central feature is a keystone shaped box of stars, called the Keystone, which represents the old boy’s shorts. From each top corner extend lines of stars that are his legs, from the bottom stars, the rest of his torso and arms extend. So in one final indignity he’s upside down in our sky. Some see him crouched down, club upraised holding the Hydra about to throttle it. For those with a telescope it contains the beautiful globular star cluster M13.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Hercules

Hercules animation showing neighboring stars, constellation outlines, deep sky objects, and constellation art for Hercules. Created using Stellarium. Click on image to enlarge.

M13

M13, the Great Globular Star Cluster in Hercules. Credit: Scott Anttila

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03/09/2018 – Ephemeris – The good ship Argo

March 9, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, March 9th. The Sun will rise at 7:06. It’ll be up for 11 hours and 35 minutes, setting at 6:41. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 2:50 tomorrow morning.

Located south and east of Canis Major, the great hunting dog of Orion and it brilliant star Sirius in the south is a dim constellation of Puppis, the poop deck of the old constellation Argo Navis, the constellation that depicts the ship Jason and the Argonauts used in their search for the Golden Fleece. This huge constellation has been subdivided. Only Puppis and Pyxis the ship’s compass are visible from Michigan. The other parts of the ship are Carina the keel, and Vela the sails require traveling south at least to the southern most of the United States. Three other constellations also related to this expedition are Gemini with Castor, who died on the expedition and Pollux. Hercules was also aboard as was the physician of the constellation Ophiuchus.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Argo Navis

Puppis ans Pyxis; what we can see from Michigan, plus the rest of Argo Navis at 9 p.m., March 9, 2018. The Stellarium artist has the ship reversed. Puppis is the rear end, not the bow. Note that the Crux, the Southern Cross is below the ship. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

07/05/2016 – Ephemeris – Poor Hercules

July 5, 2016 1 comment

Ephemeris for Tuesday, July 5th.  Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 26 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:04.  The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 10:17 this evening.

Orion, an obscure Greek hero gets a splashy constellation in the winter sky, but the greatest hero of all, Hercules, gets a dim group of stars on the border between the spring and summer stars.  At 11 p.m. Hercules is high and nearly overhead.  It’s located above and right of the bright star, Vega, high in the east.  Hercules’ central feature is a keystone shaped box of stars, called the Keystone, which represents the old boy’s shorts.  From each top corner extend lines of stars that are his legs, from the bottom stars, the rest of his torso and arms extend.  So in one final indignity he’s upside down in our sky. Some see him crouched down, club upraised holding the multi-headed Hydra about to throttle it.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors.

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors. Created with Stellarium.

Hercules art

Hercules, visualized by Johan Meuris of the Stellarium development team.

M13

M13, the Great Globular Star Cluster in Hercules. Credit: Scott Anttila.

 

06/19/2014 – Ephemeris – The constellation Hercules

June 19, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, June 19th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30.   The moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 1:50 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

Orion, the hard luck Greek hunter gets a splashy constellation in the winter sky, but the greatest hero of all, Hercules, gets a dim group of stars on the border between the spring and summer stars.  At 11 p.m. Hercules is high in the southeast.  It is located above and right of the bright star, Vega in the east.  Hercules’ central feature is a keystone shaped box of stars, called the Keystone, which represents the old boy’s shorts.  From each top corner extend lines of stars that are his legs, from the bottom stars, the rest of his torso and arms extend.  So in one final indignity he’s upside down in our sky. Some see him crouched down, club upraised holding the Hydra about to throttle it.  [For those with a telescope it contains the beautiful globular star cluster M13.]

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors.

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors. Created with Stellarium.

On Tuesday I mentioned that for the Anishinabek people around the Great Lakes, Corona Borealis is a Sweat Lodge.  Incidentally the Pleiades, only seen in the sky at the same time as Corona Borealis on autumn evenings on opposite ends of the sky, are the seven stones of the Sweat Lodge ceremony.  The stars of Hercules represents one poor fellow, who couldn’t stand the heat of the sweat lodge and is splayed on the snow near by.

M13

M13, the Great Globular Star Cluster in Hercules. Credit: Scott Anttila

 

06/08/2012 – Ephemeris – The constellation of Hercules

June 8, 2012 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, June 8th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 28 minutes, setting at 9:26.   The moon, 3 days before last quarter, will rise at 12:38 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

High in the east is the dim and reasonably large constellation of Hercules.  Here is the greatest of the Greek heroes, dim and upside down even, while the comparative nobody Orion gets a great constellation to his name in the winter.  Anyway, Hercules can be spotted by the distinctive keystone shape of stars that mark the old boy’s kilt.  Stars connected to the four corners show his body and limbs.  Check a constellation book for where all the stars lead to.  On the west side of the keystone can be spotted with binoculars a fuzzy star.  Investigations with larger and larger telescopes will reveal  a huge assembly of stars called a globular star cluster.  There’s perhaps a million stars there.  The finest in the northern heavens.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors.

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors. Created with Stellarium.

M92 is also a globular star cluster but more distant.  The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules is also designated M13.

06/23/11 – Ephemeris – The constellation Hercules

June 23, 2011 Comments off

Thursday, June 23rd.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:31.   The moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 1:30 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:58.

The greatest Greek hero of all, Hercules, gets a dim group of stars on the border between the spring and summer stars.  At 11 p.m. Hercules is high in the southeastern sky.  It is located above and right of the bright star, Vega, also in the east.  Hercules’ central feature is a keystone shaped box of stars, called the Keystone, which represents the old boy’s shorts.  From each top corner extend lines of stars that are his legs, from the bottom stars, the rest of his torso and arms extend.  So in one final indignity he’s upside down in our sky.   Just below and right of the topmost star of the keystone is what looks like a fuzzy star in binoculars or small telescope.  It is the Great Hercules Globular Star Cluster, home to a million stars.

* Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors.

The constellation Hercules and his neighbors. Created with Stellarium.