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Posts Tagged ‘Jupiter’

02/20/2019 – Ephemeris – Theoretical all 5 bright planets are now visible

February 20, 2019 Leave a comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, February 20th. Today the Sun will be up for 10 hours and 42 minutes, setting at 6:18, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:34. The Moon, 1 day past full, will rise at 7:47 this evening.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. We have two evening planets visible now. Tiny and elusive Mercury should be visible low in the west for about a half hour after 7 p.m. It should be visible for a little over a week. Binoculars are a big help in spotting it. Mars will be in the southwestern sky this evening and will set at 11:46 p.m. In the morning sky we have Jupiter which will rise tomorrow at 3:32 a.m. It is second to Venus in brightness. Saturn will be next to rise at 5:22 a.m. It is just to the right of Venus which will rise at 5:29 a.m. tomorrow. In small telescopes Saturn will show its rings and Venus will show a small slightly gibbous moon shape which will shrink and grow more full over the next months

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

 

Evening planets

Mars, Mercury and bright stars in twilight at 7 p.m. February 20, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Morning planets and the Moon at 6:30 a.m. February 21, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon as it should appear tomorrow morning with binoculars. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Jupiter, Saturn and Venus with the same magnification at 6:30 a.m. tomorrow morning February 21, 2019. See the table of Jupiter moon events tomorrow morning. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Satellite Event Date UT EST Notes
Ganymede Occultation start 21 Feb 2019 07:05:00 AM 2:05 a.m. Not visible from Michigan
Europa Shadow start 21 Feb 2019 08:36:00 AM 3:36 a.m.
Ganymede Occultation end 21 Feb 2019 09:15:00 AM 4:15 a.m.
Europa Transit start 21 Feb 2019 10:57:00 AM 5:57 a.m.
Europa Shadow end 21 Feb 2019 10:58:00 AM 5:58 a.m.
Io Eclipse start 21 Feb 2019 11:49:00 AM 6:49 a.m.
Europa Transit end 21 Feb 2019 01:21:00 PM 8:27 a.m. Not visible from Michigan

Jupiter satellite events are from https://www.projectpluto.com/jevent.htm

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on February 20, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 21st. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

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02/13/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s look at the bright planets for this week

February 13, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, February 13th. Today the Sun will be up for 10 hours and 21 minutes, setting at 6:08, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:44. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 3:10 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Our only evening planet visible now is Mars. It will be in the southwestern sky this evening and will set at 11:48 p.m. Mercury should become visible next week. In the morning sky we have Jupiter which will rise tomorrow at 3:55 a.m. It is second to Venus in brightness, and now is west of Venus. In small telescopes up to four of Jupiter’s moons are visible. Venus, which is about to pass Saturn next Monday morning, will rise at 5:24 a.m. tomorrow. In small telescopes it is a smalls slightly gibbous moon shape. Its phase will now grow more toward full as its size shrinks as it moves around and behind the Sun. Saturn will rise at 5:47 a.m. tomorrow in the east-southeast.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Mars and the Moon tonight at 8 p.m. February 13, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Mars and Uranus

Mars and Uranus as it would be seen in binoculars or small telescope at 8 p.m. February 13, 2018. The planets will be about a degree apart (2 Moon widths). Created using Stellarium.

Moon and Aldebaran

The Moon and Aldebaran at 8 p.m. February 13, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning Planets

The morning planets at 6:30 a.m. February 14, 2019. Saturn is joining Venus and Jupiter. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Venus, Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 6:30 a.m. tomorrow morning February 14, 2019. The moon Io is behind the planet at that time. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on February 13, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 14th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

02/06/2019 – Ephemeris – Saturn is back, and a look at some other bright planets

February 6, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, February 6th. Today the Sun will be up for 10 hours and 2 minutes, setting at 5:58, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:54. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 7:47 this evening.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Our only evening planet Mars will be in the southwestern sky this evening and will set at 11:50 p.m. It’s too far away to see much detail in a small telescope. In the morning sky we have Jupiter which will rise tomorrow at 4:17 a.m. It is second to Venus in brightness, and now is west of Venus. In small telescopes up to four of Jupiter’s moons are visible. Venus will rise at 5:17 a.m. tomorrow. In small telescopes it is a featureless slightly gibbous moon shape. Its phase will now grow more toward full as its size shrinks as it continues its long journey around and behind the Sun. Saturn is making an appearance in morning twilight rising at 6:12 a.m. tomorrow in the east-southeast.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Mars and the evening constellations tonight at 8 p.m. February 6, 2019. Note the faint planet Uranus near Mars.  They will appear only a degree apart next Wednesday night for a telescopic treat. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning Planets

Jupiter, Venus, and the rising Saturn at 7 a.m. tomorrow morning February 7, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Venus and Jupiter with the same magnification at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning February 7, 2019. Io is just peeking out on the lower left edge, though not quite showing up in this chart. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on February 6, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 7th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

01/30/2019 – Ephemeris – Looking for the bright planets for this week

January 30, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, January 30th. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours and 44 minutes, setting at 5:48, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:03. The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 4:55 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Our only evening planet Mars will be in the southwestern sky this evening and will set at 11:53 p.m. It’s too far away to see much detail in a small telescope. In the morning sky we have Jupiter which will rise tomorrow at 4:39 a.m. It is second to Venus in brightness, and now is west of Venus. In small telescopes up to four of Jupiter’s moons are visible. The waning crescent Moon will be between the two planets tomorrow morning. Venus will rise at 5:08 a.m. tomorrow. In small telescopes it is a featureless slightly gibbous moon shape. Its phase will now grow more toward full as its size shrinks as it continues its long journey around and behind the Sun.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planet

Mars and the evening constellations tonight at 8 p.m. January 30, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning Moon and planets

Venus, the Moon and Jupiter in the morning at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning January 31, 2019. Saturn will rise at 6:37 tomorrow morning into twilight.  It will make our morning planet view next week. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning crescent Moon as it should appear tomorrow morning, January 31, 2019, with earthshine in binoculars. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Venus and Jupiter with the same magnification at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning January 31, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on January 30, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 31st. Mercury does not show on these charts because it is south of the Sun, having passed superior conjunction on the 29th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

01/24/2019 – Ephemeris – Taurus the bull

January 24, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, January 24th. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours and 29 minutes, setting at 5:40, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:09. The Moon, half way from full to last quarter, will rise at 10:14 this evening.

Midway up the sky in the southeast at 8 p.m. is the constellation of the giant hunter Orion. Above him, to the right is Taurus the bull. His face is a letter V shape of stars lying on its side, the star cluster Hyades, with the bright orange-red star Aldebaran at one tip of the V as its angry blood-shot eye, but actually about half way between us and the cluster. Orion is depicted in the sky facing, with club in one hand and a shield in the other, the charging Taurus. The Pleiades star cluster is in his shoulder. Taurus in Greek mythology was the form the god Zeus when he carried off the maiden Europa. Europa’s still with him as the intriguing satellite orbiting Zeus’ Roman equivalent the planet Jupiter.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Taurus and Orion

Taurus and Europa at 8 p.m. January 24, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Rape of Europa

The Rape of Europa by Titian. According to the story Zeus as a bull abducted Europa and swam to Crete, where she became the first queen of that island, and bore him three sons. Other paintings of this subject are by Rembrandt and de Troy. This painting belongs to the Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum in Boston, MA. Click on the image to enlarge.

Jupiter's moon Europa

Jupiter’s satellite Europa, slightly smaller than the Earth’s moon, has a fresh ice surface with very little cratering. The ice floats on a deep water ocean supposedly containing more water than all the Earth’s oceans. Click on the image to enlarge. This is a place NASA will send a spacecraft to look for the chemistry of life. Credit NASA/JPL, Ted Stryk.

01/23/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s check out where the bright planets are for this week

January 23, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, January 23rd. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 5:38, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:10. The Moon, 2 days past full, will rise at 8:59 this evening.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Our only evening planet Mars will be in the southwestern sky this evening and will set at 11:55 p.m. It’s too far away to see much detail in a small telescope. In the morning sky we have Venus rising at 4:59 a.m. tomorrow and is prominent in the southeastern sky as our morning star. In small telescopes it is a featureless slight gibbous moon shape. Its phase will now grow more gibbous as its size shrinks as it continues its long journey around and behind the Sun. Jupiter will rise tomorrow at 5:01 a.m. It is second to Venus in brightness, and is west of Venus, but south, so Venus still rises first by 2 minutes. They will appear nearly side by side as they rise.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planet

Mars with the evening stars and constellations tonight at 8 p.m. January 23, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Venus, Jupiter and the Moon in the morning at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning January 24, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon as it should appear tomorrow morning with binoculars. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Venus and Jupiter with the same magnification at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning January 24, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on January 23, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 24th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

 

01/16/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s check out the whereabouts of the bright planets

January 16, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, January 16th. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours and 13 minutes, setting at 5:29, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:15. The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 4:20 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Our only evening planet Mars will be in the southwestern sky this evening and will set at 11:57 p.m. It’s too far away to see much detail in a small telescope. In the morning sky we have Venus rising at 4:49 a.m. tomorrow and is prominent in the southeastern sky as our morning star. In small telescopes it is a featureless slight gibbous moon shape. Its phase will now grow more gibbous as its size shrinks as it continues its long journey around and behind the Sun. Jupiter will rise tomorrow at 5:22 a.m. It is second to Venus in brightness, but second to no planet in size. Binoculars can see some of its biggest moons. Telescopes can see all four.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening Mars and Moon

Mars and the Moon with the evening stars tonight at 8 p.m. January 16, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waxing gibbous Moon as it should appear tonight in binoculars. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Venus and Jupiter in the morning at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning January 17, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Venus and Jupiter with the same magnification at 6 a.m. tomorrow morning January 17, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on January 16, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 17th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.