Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Jupiter’

10/05/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

October 5, 2022 Leave a comment

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, October 5th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 30 minutes, setting at 7:15, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:46. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 3:33 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. The waxing gibbous Moon will be visible near Saturn tonight, with the ringed planet right and above our Moon. Super bright Jupiter is to the far right of the Moon at 9 pm in the east southeast, the brightest star-like object in the sky. Jupiter is seen against the stars of Pisces the fish, while Saturn is spotted in the eastern end of Capricornus the sea goat. I don’t think the stars will be visible with the bright Moon. One star in their direction may be visible and low on the horizon and in line tonight with Saturn and the Moon. It’s Fomalhaut, normally the loneliest star in the sky. Before seven tomorrow morning, the red planet Mars will be high in the south, above the winter constellation of Orion. At that hour, Mercury can also be spotted low in the east.cc

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets and the Moon tonight

Evening planets and the Moon tonight, October 5, 2022, at 9 pm. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Annotated Gibbous Moon Animation for tonight

Annotated Gibbous Moon Animation for tonight, October 5, 2022, as it might in binoculars or a small telescope. Created using Stellarium, LibreOffice Draw and GIMP.

Translations of some lunar feature names according to Virtual Moon Atlas

Mare Crisium – Sea of Crises
Mare Fecunditatis – Sea of Fertility
Mare Frigoris – Sea of Cold
Mare Imbrium – Sea of Showers
Mare Nectaris – Sea of Nectar
Mare Nubium – Sea of Clouds
Mare Serenitatis – Sea of Serenity
Mare Tranquillitatis – Sea of Tranquility
Mare Vaporum – Sea of Vapors
Montes Apenninus – Apennines Mountains
Sinus Asperitatis – Golfe des Asperites
Sinus Iridium – Bay of Rainbows
Sinus Medii – Bay of the Center

Craters are generally named after astronomers, people of science, or explorers

Note that Mare is pronounced Mar-é

Morning planets Mars and Mercury at 7 am tomorrow

Morning planets, Mars and Mercury with the winter stars and Orion at 7 am tomorrow morning, October 6, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The image doesn’t show it, but the white north polar cap will appear at the top or north limb of Mars. Saturn and Jupiter are shown at 9 pm, Mars at 6 am. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.00″, its rings 41.91″; Jupiter 49.69″. Mars 12.44″. Mars’ distance is 69.7 million miles (112.2 million kilometers). Mercury, which isn’t shown, is 7.51″ in diameter and 40.8% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on October 5, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 6th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program and GIMP.

09/28/2022 – Ephemeris – Searching for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 28, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 28th. Today the Sun will be up for 11 hours and 51 minutes, setting at 7:28, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:38. The Moon, 3 days past new, will set at 8:51 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. The thin sliver of a waxing crescent Moon may be visible very low in the southwest at 8 pm. We’re back to two naked-eye planets in the evening sky. Jupiter was in opposition from the Sun on Monday, and closest to the Earth. As it gets darker, Jupiter will be seen first low in the east. At that time, Saturn can be seen in the southeast. Jupiter is seen against the stars of Pisces the fish, while Saturn is spotted in the eastern end of Capricornus the sea goat. At 6:45 tomorrow morning, Mars will be high in the south, above the winter constellation of Orion, and Jupiter will be very low in the west. Venus will rise in the east at 7:02 into bright twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Three day old Moon in twilight

What the three-day-old Moon might look like in binoculars in twilight at 8 pm tonight, September 28, 2022. Illumination of the night part of the Moon will be provided by the bright gibbous Earth in its sky. The phenomenon is called earth shine. Created using Stellarium.

Evening planets finder animation

Evening planet finder animation by showing Jupiter and Saturn with and without the constellation lines. For 9 pm this evening, September 28, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Morning planets and bright winter stars

Morning planet Mars with the last gasp of the new evening planet Jupiter and bright winter stars at 6:45 tomorrow morning, September 29, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars

Telescopic views of Saturn, Jupiter and Mars (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The image doesn’t show it, but the white north polar cap will appear at the top or north limb of Mars. Saturn and Jupiter are shown at 10 pm, Mars at 6 am. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.17″, its rings 42.33″; Jupiter 49.86″. Mars 11.01″. Mars’ distance is 73.8 million miles (118.7 million kilometers). The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

One surprising thing about Mars in a telescope is how bright it is. That’s because it’s much closer to the Sun than Jupiter or Saturn, even thought it has a lower albedo (reflectance) than those planets.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 28, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 29th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program and GIMP.

09/21/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 21, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 21st. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 13 minutes, setting at 7:41, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:29. The Moon, halfway from last quarter to new, will rise at 3:38 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Only one of the naked-eye planets is in the evening sky. Mercury is south of the Sun and cannot be seen. It will pass between the Earth and Sun on Friday and enter the morning sky. As it gets darker, Saturn can be seen in the southeast. Jupiter, though not officially an evening planet, will rise in the east in twilight at 7:54 pm. It is seen against the stars of Pisces now, moving slowly retrograde or westward. At 6:30 am tomorrow, two of the three remaining morning planets will be Mars high in the south, above the winter constellation of Orion, and Jupiter very low in the west. The thin waning crescent Moon will be in the east then. Venus will rise at 6:47 into bright twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Jupiter and Saturn at 9 pm

Jupiter and Saturn at 9 pm tonight, September 21, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets and waning crescent Moon

Animation of the morning planets and the waning crescent Moon at 6:30 am tomorrow, September 22, 2022. Star labels are shown alternately, since they clutter the image. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

The waning crescent Moon as it might be seen in binoculars or a small telescope. The dark area on the left side of the Moon is Oceanus Procellarum (Ocean of Storms). The dark spot near the bottom of the Moon is the crater Grimaldi. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The times vary for each planet. Jupiter is shown twice, at 9 pm and 6:30 am, since its moons, especially Io and Europa, move rapidly. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.33″, its rings 42.69″; Jupiter 49.85″. Mars 11.21″, 86.6% illuminated. Mars’ distance is 78 million miles (125 million kilometers). The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

In the above chart, it may appear that Jupiter’s Great Red Spot didn’t move very much. However, the 9.5 hours between the images is a bit less than one Jovian day, so the spot actually made almost one complete rotation. In this view, features on the face of Jupiter rotate from left to right. Satellites behave similarly. They move left to right if in front of the planet, and right to left if behind.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 21, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 22nd. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program and GIMP.

09/14/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 14, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 14th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 7:55, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:21. The Moon, 3 days before last quarter, will rise at 10:02 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Two of the naked-eye planets are in the evening sky. Mercury sets too close to the Sun to be seen in the evening. But as it gets darker, Saturn can be seen in the southeast. Jupiter, still officially a morning planet, rises in the east around 8:23 pm. It is seen against the stars of Pisces now, moving slowly retrograde or westward. At 6:30 am tomorrow the three morning planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus on the horizon in the east-northeast, if you can see it at all, to Mars high in the south-southeast below the Moon and next to the bright reddish star Aldebaran to Jupiter in the west-southwest. Mars is among the stars seen rising on late autumn and early winter evenings.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Jupiter and Saturn at 9 pm

Jupiter and Saturn at 9 pm tonight, September 14, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

The waning gibbous moon as seen in binoculars or low power telescope at 10:30 tonight, September 14, 2022. Labels are centered on their feature. Created using Stellarium, labels using LibreOffice Draw, and GIMP for animation.

Morning planets and Moon with the Moon and the bright winter stars

The morning planets with the Moon and the bright winter stars at 6:30 am tomorrow, September 15, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The times vary for each planet. Saturn is shown at 9 pm. Jupiter is shown twice, at 9 pm and 6:30 am, since its moons, especially Io and Europa, move rapidly. Mars is shown at 6:30 am. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter, so Venus isn’t shown. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.47″, its rings 43.02″; Jupiter 49.66″. Mars 10.70″, 86.0% illuminated; Venus (not shown) 9.89″, 98.5% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts) and GIMP.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 14, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 15th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program, and GIMP.

09/09/2022 – Ephemeris – Observe the Harvest Moon at the Sleeping Bear Dunes Saturday night (weather permitting)

September 9, 2022 Comments off

Update 9/10/2022, 6 pm: The weather does not permit it! We’ll have another, again weather permitting, on September 24th. This time with dark skies and a look at the summer Milky Way, two days after the end of summer. (It still counts).

This is Ephemeris for Friday, September 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 49 minutes, setting at 8:04, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:15. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 7:14 tomorrow morning.

Tomorrow night, September 10th, there will be, weather permitting, a star party at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, this will take place at the Dune Climb. Actually, it will be mostly a Moon and planet party. The event will be made possible by the rangers of the park and the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society. The society’s and member’s telescopes will take over the parking lot closest to the Dunes. The event starts at 8 p.m., near sunset, while it’s still light out and the location can be found. The Moon will join the party, rising at 8:41 pm. Oh, and it’s a supermoon. There will be a short talk about Harvest Moon lore and why it was important. See if you can find the Man in the Moon and the Chinese rabbit pounding medicine.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Harvest Moon with Jupiter and Saturn

The Harvest Moon with Jupiter and Saturn at 9 pm, September 10, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

09/07/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

September 7, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, September 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 56 minutes, setting at 8:08, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:13. The Moon, 3 days before full, will set at 4:33 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Two of the naked-eye planets are in the evening sky. Mercury sets too close to the Sun to be seen in the evening. But as it gets darker, Saturn can be seen low in the southeast. Jupiter rises in the east around 8:52 pm. It is seen against the stars of Pisces now, moving slowly retrograde or westward. At 6:30 am tomorrow the three remaining morning planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus very low in the east-northeast to Mars high in the south-southeast above the bright reddish star Aldebaran to Jupiter in the west-southwest. Mars is among the stars seen rising on late autumn and winter evenings. Venus is actually all the way to the spring constellation of Leo the lion.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets and the Moon tonight

Evening planets and the Moon tonight at 10 pm, September 7, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Closeup up of gibbous Moon with labels

The Moon tonight as it might be seen in binoculars or low power telescopes. Labels of prominent features are alternately shown with the unlabeled chart. Created using Stellarium, LibreOffice Draw and GIMP.

Translations of some feature names

Mare Crisium – Sea of Crises
Mare Fecunditatis – Sea of Fertility
Mare Frigoris – Sea of Cold
Mare Humorum – Sea of Moisture
Mare Imbrium – Sea of Showers
Mare Nectaris – Sea of Nectar
Mare Nubium – Sea of Clouds
Mare Serenitatis – Sea of Serenity
Mare Tranquillitatis – Sea of Tranquility
Mare Vaporum – Sea of Vapors
Montes Apenninus – Apennines Mountains
Oceanus Procellarum – Ocean of Storms
Sinus Asperitatis – Golfe des Asperites
Sinus Iridium – Bay of Rainbows
Sinus Medii – Bay of the Center

Note that Mare is pronounced Mar-é

Morning planets with the bright winter stars

Morning planets with the bright winter stars at 6:30 am tomorrow, September 8, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Mars (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The times vary for each planet. Jupiter is shown twice, at 10 pm and 6:30 am, since its moons, especially Io and Europa, move rapidly. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter, so Venus doesn’t show up yet. Coincidentally, Mars has reached that threshold. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.58″, its rings 43.23″; Jupiter 49.27″. Mars 10.23″, 85.5% illuminated; Venus (not shown) 9.97″, 97.9% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on September 7, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 8th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

08/31/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

August 31, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 31st. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 17 minutes, setting at 8:21, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:05. The Moon, 3 days before first quarter, will set at 10:23 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Two of the naked-eye planets are in the evening sky. Mercury sets too close to the Sun to be seen in the evening. As it gets darker, Saturn can be seen low in the southeast. Jupiter rises in the east around 9:21 pm. It is seen against the stars of Pisces now, moving slowly retrograde or westward now. At 6:15 am tomorrow the three morning planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus very low in the east-northeast to Mars high in the southeast above the bright reddish star Aldebaran to Jupiter in the southwest. Mars is among the stars seen rising on late autumn and winter evenings, when observing them then, it will be a lot colder than it will be tomorrow morning.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Jupiter and Saturn in the evening

Jupiter and Saturn in the at 10 pm tonight, August 31, 2022.

Annotated crescent Moon

Annotated animation of the Moon tonight, August 31, 2022. Created using Stellarium, LibreOffice Draw and GIMP.

Morning planets with the bright winter stars

Morning planets with the bright winter stars at 6:15 am tomorrow, September 1, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Venus

Views of Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The times vary for each planet. Jupiter is shown twice, at 10 pm and 6:15 am, since its moons, especially Io and Europa, move rapidly. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter, so Mars doesn’t show up yet. It will soon. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.67″, its rings 43.50″; Jupiter 48.74″. Mars 9.79″, 84% illuminated; Venus 10.04″. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on August 31, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on September 1st. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

August 24, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 24th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 37 minutes, setting at 8:33, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:57. The Moon, 3 days before new, will rise at 4:46 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Two of the naked-eye planets are in the evening sky. Mercury probably sets too close to the Sun to be seen in the evening, but it might be spotted very low on a Lake Michigan horizon in the west at 9 pm. As it gets darker, Saturn can be seen low in the southeast. Jupiter rises in the east around 10 pm. At 6:15 am tomorrow, the morning planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east-northeast, and below the thin crescent Moon to Jupiter in the southwest. Mars, in the southeast, will be a lot higher than both Venus and Jupiter. Mars is among the rising stars seen in the late autumn and winter evening skies, when observing them then, it will be a lot colder than it will be tomorrow morning.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mercury as it might appear at 9:05 pm

Mercury as it might appear at 9:05 pm tonight, August 24, 2024. I’ve included nearby Spica, which is easier to spot at that time. Actually, neither is likely to be visible. Mercury is only 2 1/2 degrees above a sea horizon. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter rising and Saturn

Jupiter rising, with Saturn in the southeast as it might be seen tonight, August 24, 2022. It reminds me of spotting Jupiter rising at our star party Monday night at the Sleeping Bear Dunes. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets and the Moon

Morning planets and the Moon at 6 am tomorrow morning, August 25, 2022. The Moon will appear as a tiny sliver of a crescent. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Venus

Views of Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The times vary for each planet. Saturn is shown at 11 pm, Jupiter is shown at midnight. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter, so Mars doesn’t show up yet. It will soon. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.73″, its rings 43.63″; Jupiter 48.08″. Mars 9.40″, 84.9% illuminated; Venus 10.31″, 94.3% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on August 24, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 25th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

August 17, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 17th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 57 minutes, setting at 8:45, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:48. The Moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 11:37 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Two of the naked-eye planets are in the evening sky: Mercury sets too close to the Sun to be seen in the evening, but as it gets darker, Saturn can be seen low in the southeast. At 6 am tomorrow, the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east-northeast to Saturn in the west-southwest. Mars will be a lot higher than Venus in the southeast. Jupiter is farther to the right in the south-southwest. Mars is dimmer than Jupiter, but is slowly getting brighter as the Earth creeps up on it. Saturn ends the line of planets lower than Venus, if it’s visible at all, in the west-southwest, only 5 degrees above a sea, or Lake Michigan horizon.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

An animation showing Saturn at 10 pm, along with three zodiacal constellations, with and without labels, just after the end of nautical twilight tonight at 10 pm, August 17, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

The Moon as it might appear at midnight tonight, August 18, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn Jupiter and Venus

Views of Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. The times vary for each planet. Jupiter is shown twice, at midnight and 6 am, since its moons, especially Io and Europa, move rapidly. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter, so Mars doesn’t show up yet. It will soon. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.76″, its rings 43.70″; Jupiter 47.33″. Mars 9.04″, 84.7% illuminated; Venus 10.31″, 94.3% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on August 17, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 18th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

08/10/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

August 10, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 10th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 16 minutes, setting at 8:56, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:40. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 5:37 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All but one of the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, That one is Mercury, too close to the Sun to be seen in the evening. At 6 am tomorrow, the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east-northeast to Saturn in the west-southwest. Mars will be a lot higher than Venus in the southeast. Jupiter is farther to the right in the south-southwest. Mars is dimmer than Jupiter, but is slowly getting brighter as the Earth creeps up on it. Saturn ends the line of planets much lower than Venus in the west-southwest. Tonight, Saturn will rise about 9:12 pm in the east-southeast. It won’t be in the morning sky next week, having moved into the evening sky.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Saturn and the Moon at 10 in the evening

Saturn and the Moon at 10 in the evening. Saturn is not officially in the evening sky, but it rises shortly after sunset. Created using Stellarium.

The Moon tonight

The Moon tonight with animated labels for 10 pm, August 10, 2022. Created using Stellarium; Labels, LibreOffice Draw, animation, GIMP.

Morning planets at 6 am

Morning planets at 6 am tomorrow morning, August 11, 2022. With six weeks left in summer, the bright winter stars begin to appear in morning twilight, along with the planets. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 158 degrees. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Saturn and Jupiter and Venus

Views of Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification. Saturn is shown at 10 pm EDT (UT -4) on August 10, 2022. Jupiter and Venus are shown for, tomorrow morning at 6 am. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Saturn 18.76″, its rings 43.70″; Jupiter 46.47″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 8.71″, 84.7% illuminated; Venus 10.46″, 94.3% illuminated. Jupiter’s moon Europa is in the planet’s shadow at that time. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on August 10, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 11th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets except Mercury are in the morning sky now. That’s about to change in a week and a half, when Saturn moves into the evening sky at opposition on the 14th. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.