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Posts Tagged ‘Mars’

05/02/2018 – Ephemeris – We’re taking our weekly look at the bright planets

May 2, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 2nd. The Sun rises at 6:31. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 17 minutes, setting at 8:49. The Moon, 3 days past full, will rise at 11:31 this evening.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. One bright planet is in the evening sky, the brightest, Venus. It will be visible low in the western twilight from about 9:10 p.m. until it sets at 11:15. The star Aldebaran will be seen below and left of Venus tonight. Jupiter will rise this evening at 9:11 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet, which it will be next Wednesday. Saturn will rise at 1:09 a.m., while Mars will rise at 2:18 a.m.

At 5:30 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south, with Mars to the left of Saturn with the Moon between Jupiter and Saturn.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 9:15 p.m, tonight May 2, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planets

The morning planets at 5:30 a.m. May 3, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon at 5:30 a.m. May 3, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic morning planets

The morning planets as seen in a telescope using the same magnification at 5:30 a.m. May 3, 2018. A magnified image of Mars is inset showing some of the features that may be visible under higher magnification. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 2, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 3rd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

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04/25/2018 – Ephemeris – It’s bright planet Wednesday

April 25, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 25th. The Sun rises at 6:41. It’ll be up for 13 hours and 58 minutes, setting at 8:40. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 5:22 tomorrow morning.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. One bright planet is in the evening sky, the brightest, Venus. It will be visible low in the western twilight from about 9:10 p.m. until it sets at 10:58. Venus is blindingly bright in binoculars or a small telescope. Jupiter will rise this evening at 9:42 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet. Give it a couple of weeks. Saturn will rise at 1:37 a.m., while Mars will rise at 2:33 a.m.

At 6 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south, with Mars to the left of Saturn in the morning twilight.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 9 p.m, tonight April 25, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

The Gibbous Moon

The Gibbous Moon tonight at 10 p.m., April 25, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planets

The morning planets at 6 a.m. April 26, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic morning planets

The morning planets as seen in a telescope using the same magnification. A magnified image of Mars is inset showing some of the features that may be visible under higher magnification. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 25, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 26th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/18/2018 – Ephemeris – It’s Wednesday, do you know where the bright planets are?

April 18, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 18th. The Sun rises at 6:53. It’ll be up for 13 hours and 38 minutes, setting at 8:31. The Moon, 3 days past new, will set at 11:38 this evening.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. One bright planet is in the evening sky, the brightest, Venus. It will be visible low in the Western twilight from about 8:40 p.m. until it sets at 10:34. Venus is blindingly bright in binoculars or a small telescope.

Jupiter will rise late this evening at 10:23 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet. Saturn will rise at 2:17 a.m., while Mars will rise at 2:52 a.m. At 6 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south-southeast, with Mars to the left of Saturn in the morning twilight.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and the Moon in evening twilight

Venus and the Moon in evening twilight at 9 p.m, tonight April 18, 2018. The Moon is shown at 3 times its actual size for clarity. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 9 p.m. April 18, 2018. Earth shine should be visible. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

The morning planets at 6 a.m. April 19, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planets as seen in a telescope using the same magnification. A magnified image of Mars is inset showing some of the features that may be visible under higher magnification. The large dark area below right of center on Mars is Syrtis Major “The Great Swamp”. It sounds so much better in the original Latin. Of course there probably hasn’t been a swamp on Mars in 3 billion years, give or take. Today the disc of Mars attained a diameter of 9.9 seconds of arc. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 18, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 19th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/11/2018 – Ephemeris – Looking at the bright planets for this week

April 11, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 11th. The Sun will rise at 7:05. It’ll be up for 13 hours and 17 minutes, setting at 8:22. The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 5:45 tomorrow morning.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. One bright planet is in the evening sky, the brightest, Venus. It will be visible low in the Western twilight from about 8:40 p.m. until it sets at 10:20. Venus is blindingly bright in binoculars or a small telescope. Jupiter will rise late this evening at 10:45 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet. Saturn will rise at 2:32 a.m., while Mars will rise at 3 a.m. At 6 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south-southeast, with Mars below-left of Saturn.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in the evening

Venus in evening twilight at 9 p.m, tonight April 11, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

The morning planets at 6 a.m. April 12, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Jupiter and Saturn

The morning planets Jupiter and Saturn as seen by a telescope using the same magnification for both at 6 a.m. April 12, 2018. a.m. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 11, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 12th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/04/2018 – Ephemeris – Wednesday is bright planet day on Ephemeris

April 4, 2018 Comments off

Wednesday, April 4th. The Sun will rise at 7:18. It’ll be up for 12 hours and 56 minutes, setting at 8:14. The Moon, half way from full to last quarter, will rise at 12:44 tomorrow morning.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. We’re down to 4 the naked eye planets are visible now. One is in the evening sky. Venus will be visible low in the Western twilight from about 8:40 p.m. until it sets at 10:01. Mercury is in the morning sky, but too close to the Sun to be seen by anybody. Jupiter will rise late this evening at 11:16 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet. Saturn will rise at 2:59 a.m., while Mars will rise 14 minutes later at 3:13 a.m. At 6 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south-southeast, with Mars below Saturn.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 9 p.m, tonight April 4, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets and the Moon

The morning planets and the Moon at 6 a.m. April 5, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon at 6 a.m. April 5, 2018 as it might be seen in binoculars.

Telescopic planets

The morning planets as seen by a telescope using the same magnification for all at 6 a.m. April 5, 2018. a.m. Jupiter’s moon Io is in the planet’s shadow. See the table below from Project Pluto. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Moon Event             Date     Universal Time   Local time   
Io : Eclipse start     5 Apr 2018  9:04 UT        5:04 EDT
Io : Occultation end   5 Apr 2018 11:57 UT        7:57 EDT (unseen)
Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 4, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 5th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.


 

03/28/2018 – Ephemeris – Four bright planets are visible

March 28, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, March 28th. The Sun will rise at 7:31. It’ll be up for 12 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 8:05. The Moon, 3 days before full, will set at 6:49 tomorrow morning.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. We’re down to 4 the naked eye planets are visible now. One is in the evening sky. Venus will be visible low in the Western twilight from about 8:30 p.m. until before it sets at 9:43. Mercury is heading between the Earth and the Sun, not directly but will enter the morning sky Sunday. It’s morning appearance later next month will not be a good one for us in the northern hemisphere. Late this evening Jupiter will rise at 11:46. Mars will rise at 3:23 a.m. Saturn will end the procession, rising 3 minutes later. At 6 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the south-southwest, dimmer Mars will be in the south-southeast, just right of and a bit below Saturn.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening Venus and Moon

Venus, the bright winter stars and the Moon at 8:30 p.m. tonight March 28, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Gibbous Moon tonight at 8:30 p.m., March 28, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planets

The morning planets and constellations at 6 a.m. March 29, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium

Telescopic morning planets to scale

The morning planets as seen by a telescope using the same magnification for all at 6 a.m. March 29, 2018. At 6 a.m. Jupiter’s moon Io is behind the planet. See the table below for Io events in the morning. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Moon  Event            Date        Time      Local Time
Io:   Eclipse start:   29 Mar 2018  7:10 UT  3:10 a.m. EDT
Io:   Occultation end: 29 Mar 2018 10:11 UT  6:11 a.m. EDT
Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on March 28, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 29th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

03/21/2018 – Ephemeris – The bright planets this week

March 21, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, March 21st. The Sun will rise at 7:44. It’ll be up for 12 hours and 12 minutes, setting at 7:56. The Moon, 3 days before first quarter, will set at 12:39 tomorrow morning.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. All 5 of the naked eye planets are visible now. Two of them are in the evening sky, but very close to the Sun. Venus will be visible low in the Western twilight from about 8:10 p.m. until before it sets at 9:26. Mercury is much dimmer but at the same height and to the right of Venus, tonight by about 8 Moon widths. Mercury is dimming rapidly. In the morning Jupiter will rise at 12:20. Mars will rise at 3:33. Saturn will end the procession, rising at 3:53 a.m. At 7 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars will be in the south. Saturn will be in the south-southeast.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Morning planets

The morning planets of Jupiter, Mars and Saturn seen at 7 a.m. EDT this morning March 21, 2018. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Jupiter and Saturn

Jupiter and Saturn with their brighter satellites this morning at 7 a.m. March 21, 2018. They are displayed at the same scale. Saturn in about twice as far as Jupiter. Its disk is a bit smaller than Jupiter’s so it appears about half as large. The extent of the rings appear to be about the same as Jupiter’s diameter. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Jovian satellite events this morning
Satellite Event              Date       Universal  Local Time 
Ganymede: Eclipse start:     21 Mar 2018  7:30 UT  3:30 am EDT
Io      : Shadow start:      21 Mar 2018  8:08 UT  4:08 am EDT
Io      : Transit start:     21 Mar 2018  9:09 UT  5:09 am EDT
Ganymede: Eclipse end :      21 Mar 2018  9:15 UT  5:15 am EDT
Io      : Shadow end :       21 Mar 2018 10:18 UT  6:18 am EDT
Io      : Transit end :      21 Mar 2018 11:17 UT  7:17 am EDT
Ganymede: Occultation start: 21 Mar 2018 11:50 UT  Not visible
Ganymede: Occultation end :  21 Mar 2018 12:54 UT  Not visible

An eclipse is when the moon passes through Jupiter’s shadow.
An occultation is when the moon is hidden behind the planet.
Shadow denotes the projection of a satellite’s shadow on the face of Jupiter.
Transit is the passage of a satellite across the face of Jupiter.  It becomes hard to find against the.

Timings are from https://www.projectpluto.com.

Venus and Mercury, low in the west

Venus and Mercury, low in the west at 8:30 p.m., March 21, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waxing crescent Moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 9 p.m. tonight. March 21, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Planets at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on March 21, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 22nd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.