Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Mercury’

08/21/2019 – Ephemeris – Where are all the bright planets?

August 21, 2019 1 comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 21st. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 47 minutes, setting at 8:39, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:53. The Moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 11:41 this evening.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mars and Venus are too close to the Sun to be seen. Mars is still on the evening or east side of the Sun, as is Venus which passed superior conjunction with the Sun a week ago. Bright Jupiter will be in the southern sky as it gets dark. With steadily held binoculars a few of the 4 largest satellites of Jupiter can be seen. Four of Jupiter’s largest satellites can be spotted in telescopes tonight. Jupiter will set at 1:04 a.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the southern sky in the evening. It will pass the meridian, due south at 10:45 p.m. and will set at 3:12 a.m. Mercury will rise at 5:44 a.m. in the east-northeast.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon with the bright stars of the southern summer sky at 10 p.m. August 21, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Telescopic views of Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 10 p.m.August 21, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Moon, Mercury and bright stars in the morning twilight

The Moon, Mercury and bright stars in the morning twilight at 6 a.m. August 22, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon at 6 a.m. August 22, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on August 21, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 22nd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

08/14/2019 – Ephemeris – Looking for the bright planets this week

August 14, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 14th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 6 minutes, setting at 8:50, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:44. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 6:36 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for This week. Mars, Mercury and Venus are all too close to the Sun to be seen. Mars is still on the evening or east side of the Sun, as is Venus which passed superior conjunction with the Sun a few hours ago. Mercury is on the west or morning side of the Sun. Bright Jupiter will be in the southern sky as it gets dark. It will pass the meridian, due south at 9:03 p.m. With steadily held binoculars a few of the 4 largest satellites of Jupiter can be seen. Four of Jupiter’s largest satellites can be spotted in telescopes tonight. Three, on the west and one east of the planet. Jupiter will set at 1:31 a.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the south-southeast in the evening. It will set at 3:41 a.m.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus at superior conjunction

Venus and the Sun’s corona at 10:48 p.m. August 13, 2019 in the LASCO C2 coronagraph on the SOHO satellite stationed a million miles sunward of the Earth. Venus is beyond the Sun in superior conjunction. Credit ESA/NASA.

Evening Planets

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon with the bright stars of the southern summer sky at 10 p.m. August 14, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars about 6 hours before full at 10 p.m. August 14, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 10 p.m. August 14, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Mercury in the morning

Mercury and bright stars in the morning twilight at 6 a.m. August 15, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on August 14, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 15th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

08/07/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s check out the bright planets for this week

August 7, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 25 minutes, setting at 9:00, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:36. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 1:00 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for the first full week in August. Mars, Mercury and Venus are all too close to the Sun to be seen. Mars is still on the evening or east side of the Sun. Mercury and Venus are on the west or morning side of the Sun. Bright Jupiter will be in the southern sky as it gets dark. It will pass the meridian, due south at 9:30 p.m. With steadily held binoculars a few of the 4 largest satellites of Jupiter can be seen. Four of Jupiter’s largest satellites can be spotted in telescopes tonight. Two, on the east and two west of Jupiter. Jupiter will set at 1:58 a.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the south-southeast in the evening, the brightest star-like object in that direction, but significantly dimmer than Jupiter. It will set at 4:10 a.m.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon with the bright stars of the southern summer sky at 10:30 p.m. August 7, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

The first quarter Moon

The first quarter Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight at 10:30 p.m. August 7, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 1o:30 p.m.August 7, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on August 7, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 8th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/31/2019 – Ephemeris – Looking at the bright planets on this last day of July

July 31, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 31st. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 42 minutes, setting at 9:10, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:28. The Moon is new today, and won’t be visible.

Let’s look at the planets for the last day of July. Mars, Mercury and Venus are all too close to the Sun to be seen. Mars is still on the evening or east side of the Sun. Mercury and Venus are on the west or morning side of the Sun. Bright Jupiter will be in the southern sky as it gets dark. It will pass the meridian, due south at 9:58 p.m. With steadily held binoculars a few of the 4 largest satellites of Jupiter can be seen. Three of Jupiter’s largest satellites can be spotted in telescopes tonight. One, Ganymede will be passing in front of the planet tonight. Jupiter will set at 2:26 a.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be lower down in the southeast in the evening, the brightest star-like object in that direction, but significantly dimmer than Jupiter. It will set at 4:40 a.m.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the constellations of the southern summer sky at 10:30 p.m. July 31, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 11p.m. July 31, 2019. Jupiter’s moon Ganymede is about to transit the face of Jupiter. The transit starts at 11:11 p.m. and ends at 1:32 a.m. Despite how they appear here Jupiter’s moons are dimmer than the planet. The same is true for Saturn’s moons, however Titan is much brighter than the other moons. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on July 31, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on August 1st. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/24/2019 – Ephemeris – Jupiter and Saturn dominate the evening sky

July 24, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 24th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 57 minutes, setting at 9:17, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:21. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 1:14 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mars, Mercury and Venus are all too close to the Sun to be seen. Mars is still on the evening or east side of the Sun. Mercury has crossed over and has joined Venus on the west or morning side of the Sun. Bright Jupiter will be in the southern sky as it gets dark. It will pass the meridian, due south at 10:27 p.m. With steadily held binoculars a few of the 4 largest satellites of Jupiter can be seen. All four of Jupiter’s largest satellites can be spotted in telescopes. Jupiter will set at 2:55 a.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be lower down in the southeast in the evening, the brightest star-like object in that direction, but significantly dimmer than Jupiter. It will set at 5:10 a.m.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Jupiter and Saturn with the constellations

Jupiter and Saturn with the constellations of the southern summer sky at 10:30 p.m. July 24, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning Moon one day past last quarter at 5 a.m. July 25, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 11p.m. July 24, 2019. Jupiter’s moon Ganymede transited the planet earlier in the evening, but its shadow will cross the face of Jupiter from 11:25 p.m. to 1:53 a.m. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on July 24, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 25th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/10/2019 – Ephemeris – A look at the bright planets for this week

July 10, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 10th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 21 minutes, setting at 9:28, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:07. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 2:26 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mercury is now too close to the Sun to be seen. Mars itself is difficult to spot low in the west-northwest, setting at 10:29 p.m. Bright Jupiter will be in the southern sky by 10:30 p.m. With steadily held binoculars a few of the 4 largest satellites of Jupiter can be seen. All four of Jupiter’s largest satellites can be spotted in telescopes. Tonight they will be all arrayed on one side of the planet. Also at 10:30 Saturn will be lower down in the southeast, the brightest star-like object in that direction, but significantly dimmer than Jupiter. The only bright planet left in the morning sky is Venus, which is too close to the Sun to be spotted.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mars Setting

Mars about to set, seen at 10:15 p.m. July 10, 2019. Mars and the stars have been brightened. Created by Stellarium.

Evening planets and the Moon

The Moon, Jupiter and Saturn in the southern sky at 11 p.m., July 10, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The gibbous Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight at 11 p.m. July 10, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 11p.m. July 10, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on July 10, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 11th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/03/2019 – Ephemeris – Our weekly look at the bright planets

July 3, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 3rd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 29 minutes, setting at 9:31, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:02. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 10:33 this evening.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mars, Mercury and the Moon will be low in the west-northwestern sky to the left of the star Pollux. Mercury and Mars are now slightly dimmer than Pollux tonight. Mercury is moving below Mars now. Mercury will set at 10:35 p.m., with Mars following 9 minutes later. Jupiter will start the evening low in the southeast. It’s far brighter than any star and will be visible just about all night, setting at 4:24 a.m. It’s in Ophiuchus the serpent bearer now, just above Scorpius the scorpion. Though still officially a morning planet, Saturn will rise at 9:42 p.m., in the east-southeast. It will be up the rest of the night. It’s in Sagittarius the archer. Venus remains too close to the Sun to be seen.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mars Mercury Moon

Mars, Mercury and the Moon near the west-northwestern horizon at 10:15 p.m., July 3, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium. Stellarium cannot render the crescent on the day old Moon.

Jupiter Saturn and evening constellations

Jupiter Saturn and evening constellations for 11 p.m. July 3, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 11p.m. (3:00 UT), July 3, 2019. Io will disappear behind Jupiter at 12:42 a.m. (4:42 UT) and will reappear from Jupiter’s shadow on the other side at 3:26 a.m. (7:26 UT). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on July 3, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 4th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.