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06/12/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s look at the bright planets for this week

June 12, 2019 Leave a comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 12th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 31 minutes, setting at 9:28, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:53 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the bright planets for this week. Mars and Mercury will be low in the west-northwestern sky under the stars Castor and Pollux, which are nearly horizontally arraigned this evening. Mercury is 5 times brighter than Mars, which is a bit above and left of it. Mercury will set at 11:11 p.m. with Mars setting shortly after. Jupiter will start the evening low in the southeast. It far brighter than any star and will be visible all night, setting shortly before sunrise. It’s in Ophiuchus. In the morning sky we have Saturn which will rise at 11:06 p.m., in the east-southeast. It’s in Sagittarius. Both Jupiter and Saturn are easily visible in the predawn skies for very early risers. Venus is too close to the Sun to be seen.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

The Moon and the evening planets at 10:30 p.m. June 12, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The gibbous Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight at 10:30 p.m. June 12, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planet

Jupiter and Saturn at 4:30 a.m. June 13, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification but at different times. Jupiter at 10:30 p.m. June 12 2019 while Saturn is for tomorrow morning.. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on June 12, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 13th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/05/2019 – Ephemeris – Where are the bright planets for this week?

June 5, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 5th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 25 minutes, setting at 9:24, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:58. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 11:49 this evening.

Let’s look at the bright planets for this week. Mars will be low in the west-northwestern sky this evening, below and right of the crescent Moon. It will set at 11:33 p.m. In the morning sky we have Jupiter, in Ophiuchus, which will actually rise at 9:35 tonight in the east-southeast. Jupiter will reach opposition from the Sun next Monday and thereafter rise before sunset and officially become an evening planet. Saturn will be next to rise at 11:39 p.m., also in the east-southeast. It’s in Sagittarius. Both planets are easily visible in as morning twilight grows. Mercury will become visible in the evening sky below Mars in a few days. It’s greatest separation from the Sun will be on the 23rd. Venus, is too close to the Sun to be seen.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening Planets

Mars, the Moon, and Jupiter tonight at 10:30 p.m. June 5, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight at 10:30 p.m. June 5, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn at 5 a.m. June 6, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification but at different times. Jupiter at 11 p.m. June 5, 2019 while Saturn is for tomorrow morning.. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on June 5, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 6th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/09/2019 – Ephemeris – The USA: Step by step to the Moon

May 9, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, May 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 35 minutes, setting at 8:57, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:20. The Moon, 2 days before first quarter, will set at 1:54 tomorrow morning.

The Apollo 11 manned landing on the Moon 50 years ago was the culmination of a series of incremental steps. The Mercury program was in progress when President Kennedy announce the goal to land on the Moon. Following that was Gemini a two man capsule to test long duration flight, rendezvous and docking of two spacecraft, and EVA’s or spacewalks. There was the Ranger program attempted to photograph the Moon close up by sending probes to crash into the Moon. The Lunar Orbiter program to map the entire Moon, the Surveyor program to soft land on the Moon and test its surface. All this leading up to the three man Apollo program to test out the strategy and equipment and to land humans on the Moon.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Project Mercury

Project Mercury astronauts and a model of the Mercury-Atlas rocket and capsule. Left to right: Grissom, Shepard, Carpenter, Schirra, Slayton, Glenn and Cooper, in 1962. Click on the image to enlarge. Credit NASA.

Project Gemini

Project Gemini: Left Ed White during the US first space walk during Gemini 4 in June of 1965. Right The rendezvous of Gemini 6 & 7 in December of 1965. Click on the image to enlarge. Credit NASA.

Ranger Program

Left: The Ranger spacecraft. Right: The floor of the crater Alphonsus from Ranger 9. Only the last 3 spacecraft were successful. They transmitted images all the way down as they crashed into the Moon. Click on the image to enlarge. Credit NASA.

Lunar Orbiter program

In the most unheralded of the lunar programs the 5 successful Lunar Orbiter satellites photographed 99% of the Moon. from 1966 to 1967. The Moon was photographed on film in strips, developed and the images scanned and transmitted back to Earth. Right: The oblique view of the crater Copernicus was dubbed at the time “The Picture of the Century”. Click on the image to enlarge. Credit NASA.

Surveyor program

Surveyor 3, visited by astronaut Pete Conrad during the Apollo 12 mission. Click on the image to enlarge. Credit: NASA / Alan Bean.

 

05/01/2019 – Ephemeris – Checking out the bright planets for May Day

May 1, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 1st. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 14 minutes, setting at 8:47, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:31. The Moon, 3 days before new, will rise at 5:54 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this first day of May. Mars will be in the western sky this evening, in the horns above the V-shaped stars of the face of Taurus the bull. It will set at 12:13 a.m. In the morning sky we have Jupiter, in Ophiuchus, which will rise tomorrow at 12:09 a.m. in the east-southeast. Saturn will be next to rise at 2 a.m., also in the east-southeast. It is in Sagittarius. Venus will rise 57 minutes before the Sun in the east. It will remain in our morning sky, though too close to the rising Sun to be easily glimpsed. In August it will pass behind the Sun to enter the evening sky. It will be in position later this year to be our bright evening Christmas Star. Mercury will rise only 32 minutes before the Sun.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mars and the setting winter stars

Mars and the setting winter stars tonight at 10 p.m. May 1, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Morning planets and Moon at 5:30 a.m. May 1, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Note that at this time for the Grand Traverse area the International Space Station will be visible, crossing from the southwest starting at 5:25 and ending in the east-northeast at 5:31 a.m. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 5:30 a.m. tomorrow morning May 2, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Io’s shadow will start to cross Jupiter’s disk at 9:27 UT or 5:27 a.m. EDT.
Io’s will start to transit the planet at 10:19 UT or 6:19 a.m. EDT.

Io events for observers west of here can be accessed from Project Pluto:  https://www.projectpluto.com/jevent.htm#may.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 1, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 2nd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

04/17/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s look for the bright planets

April 17, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 17th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 8:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:53. The Moon, 2 days before full, will set at 6:53 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mars will be in the western sky this evening, above the V-shaped stars of the face of Taurus the bull. It will set at 12:23 a.m. In the morning sky we have Jupiter, in Ophiuchus, which will rise tomorrow at 1:07 a.m. in the east-southeast. Saturn will be next to rise at 2:54 a.m., also in the east-southeast. It is in Sagittarius. Venus will rise at 5:56 a.m. again in the east-southeast. By 6:30 in the morning they will be strung out from the south down to the eastern horizon. Venus will remain in our morning sky, though more difficult to see until August when it passes behind the Sun to enter the evening sky. Tiny Mercury may be glimpsed a bit left and just below Venus in the bright twilight.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Mars and the Moon tonight at 9:30 p.m. April 17, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waxing gibbous nearly full Moon at 9:30 p.m. April 17, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Morning planets and Moon at 6:30 a.m. April 18, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the same magnification at 6:30 a.m. tomorrow morning April 18, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Jupiter’s moon Io events earlier in the morning

Moon Event Date U.T. EDT
Io Shadow start 18 Apr 2019 05:40 1:40 AM
Io Transit start 18 Apr 2019 06:44 2:44 AM
Io Shadow end 18 Apr 2019 07:51 3:51 AM
Io Transit end 18 Apr 2019 08:56 4:56 AM
Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 17, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 18th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/10/2019 – Ephemeris – Looking for the bright planets for this week

April 10, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 10th. Today the Sun will be up for 13 hours and 13 minutes, setting at 8:21, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:05. The Moon, 2 days before first quarter, will set at 2:04 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mars will be in the western sky this evening, to the right of the V-shaped stars of the face of Taurus the bull. It will set at 12:27 a.m. In the morning sky we have Jupiter which will rise tomorrow at 1:35 a.m. in the east-southeast. It is second to Venus in brightness. Saturn will be next to rise at 3:21 a.m., also in the east-southeast. Venus will rise at 6:05 a.m. again in the east-southeast. By 6:30 in the morning they will be strung out from the southeast to the south. Venus will remain in our morning sky until August when it passes behind the Sun. Tiny Mercury may be glimpsed a bit left and just below Venus in the bright twilight.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mars and the moon in the evening

Mars and the Moon in the evening at 9:30 p.m. April 10, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight at 9 p.m. April 10, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Morning planets at 6:30 a.m. April 11, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Planets

Jupiter, Saturn and Venus with the same magnification at 6:30 a.m. tomorrow morning April 11, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 10, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 11th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

04/03/2019 – Ephemeris – Let’s check out the bright planets for this week

April 3, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 3rd. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 52 minutes, setting at 8:12, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:18. The Moon, 2 days before new, will rise at 7:27 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the planets for this week. Mars will be in the western sky this evening, to the right of the V shaped stars of the face of Taurus the bull. It will set at 12:31 a.m. In the morning sky we have Jupiter which will rise tomorrow at 2:02 a.m. in the east-southeast. It is second to Venus in brightness. Saturn will be next to rise at 3:48 a.m., also in the east-southeast. Venus will rise at 6:13 a.m. again in the east-southeast. By 7 in the morning they will be strung out from the southeast to the south. Venus will remain in our morning sky until August when it passes behind the Sun. It will emerge to become a bright addition to our winter and spring evening skies later this year and next. Mercury will be

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mars in the evening

Mars in the evening at 9 p.m. April 3, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Morning planets at 6:45 a.m. April 4, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Jupiter, Saturn and Venus with the same magnification at 6:45 a.m. tomorrow morning April 4, 2019. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 3, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 4th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.