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07/28/2021 – Ephemeris – Searching for the naked-eye planets on the last Wednesday in July

July 28, 2021 Leave a comment

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 28th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 48 minutes, setting at 9:13, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:25. The Moon, 3 days before last quarter, will rise at 11:58 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 9:45 pm. It will set at 10:39 pm. Venus will be spending the rest of summer low in the western sky, and not be as conspicuous as it usually is as the Evening Star. Mars, I believe, is too faint and close to the Sun to be seen from northern latitudes. Saturn will be seen low in the southeast in the evening, with Jupiter rising later. Saturn, 5 days from opposition, that is being opposite the Sun in the sky and closest to Earth, will rise at 9:21 pm. Brighter Jupiter will rise at 10:12 pm, both planets will rise in the east-southeast. By 5:30 am, these two planets will be in the southwestern sky in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in twilight in thje west

Venus in evening twilight in the west at 10 pm, July 28, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn at 11 pm

Jupiter and Saturn low in the southeast at 11 pm. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon as it might be seen in binoculars or small telescope at 5:30 am, July 29, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

The naked-eye planets as they would be seen in small telescopes

Telescopic view of the bright planets (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, this evening, July 28, 2021. Apparent diameters: Venus, 12.58″; Saturn 18.59″, its rings 43.31″; Jupiter, 48.28″. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon overnight tonight

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on July 28, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 29th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/14/2021 – Ephemeris – It’s Wednesday, do you know where your naked-eye planets are?

July 14, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 14th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 15 minutes, setting at 9:26, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:11. The Moon, 3 days before first quarter, will set at 12:23 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm or a little after. It will set at 10:57 pm. Venus will be spending the rest of summer low in the western sky, and not be as conspicuous as it usually is as the Evening Star. Mars’ visibility is a real problem. It will be to the right and a bit below Venus in the evening, and will set at 10:52 pm. It’s much dimmer than Venus, so I doubt anyone at our northern latitude could spot it. Saturn and Jupiter, are seen starting very late in the evening and best in the morning sky. Saturn will rise at 10:18 pm. Brighter Jupiter will rise at 11:09 pm, both in the east-southeast. By 5 am, these two planets will be in the southern sky in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus, Mars and the Moon in evening twilight

Venus, Mars and the Moon in evening twilight at 10:15 pm, about 50 minutes after sunset on July 14, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars or small telescope this evening, July 14, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Saturn rising in the southeast

Saturn, rising in the southeast at 11 pm, about an hour and a half after sunset tonight, July 14, 2021. Astronomical twilight here has not yet ended. The Teapot asterism of Sagittarius is seen in the south-southeast. Scorpius’ tail, not shown, is scraping the horizon in the south. Saturn is in Capricornus, with two of its stars visible above it. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn in the morning

Jupiter and Saturn at 5 am tomorrow morning. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of what the planets might appear like tonight

The planets as seen in a telescope (north up) with the same magnification for the night of July 14/15, 2021. Times of the display are: Venus, 10:30 pm; Saturn and Jupiter, 5 am. Apparent diameters: Venus, 11.77″; Saturn 18.50″, its rings 43.09″; Jupiter, 46.99″. Mars has an apparent diameter of only 3.75″ and is not represented. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night sunset 071421 to sunrise 071521

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on July 14, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 15th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/07/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

July 7, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 24 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:05. The Moon, 2 days before new, will rise at 4:36 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm or a little after. It will set at 11:03 pm. Venus will be spending the rest of summer low in the western sky, and not be as conspicuous as it usually is as the Evening Star. Mars’ visibility is getting to be a real problem. It can be found to the left and a bit above Venus at 10:30 pm, and will set at 11:06 pm. Saturn and Jupiter, are seen best in the morning sky. Saturn will rise before midnight at 10:47 pm. It’s seen with the stars of Capricornus. Brighter Jupiter, to the left of Saturn, will rise at 11:34 pm. By 5 am, these two planets will be in the southern sky in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4 hr). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and Mars in the evening twilight

Venus and Mars in the evening twilight at 10:30 pm tonight, July 7, 2021. I’m not promising that Mars will be visible, since it’s now down to second magnitude. Created using Stellarium.

Saturn Finder animation for 11:30 pm

Saturn finder animation for 11:30 pm tonight, July 7, 2021. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Jupiter and Saturn at 5 am

Jupiter and Saturn at 5 am tomorrow morning, July 8, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Mercury and the Moon at 5:15 am

Mercury and the Moon at 5:15 am tomorrow morning, July 8, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

The planets as seen in a telescope (north up) with the same magnification for the night of July 7/8, 2021. Times of the display are: Venus, 10:30 pm; Saturn and Jupiter, 5 am. Apparent diameters: Venus, 11.46″; Saturn 18.41″, its rings 42.88″; Jupiter, 46.18″. Mars has an apparent diameter of only 3.80″, and Mercury of 7.32 and are not represented. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night sunset 070721 to sunrise 070821

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on July 7, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 8th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/30/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 30, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 30th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 31 minutes, setting at 9:32, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:01. The Moon, 1 day before last quarter, will rise at 1:35 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm or a little after. It will set at 11:06 pm. Venus will be spending the rest of summer low in the western sky for the rest of summer, and not be a conspicuous as it usually is. Mars can be found in the west-northwest at 11pm. It’s in Cancer and will set at 11:25 pm as it is slowly losing its race with the Sun. Saturn and Jupiter, are seen best in the morning sky. Saturn will rise before midnight at 11:15 pm. It’s seen with the stars of Capricornus. Brighter Jupiter, to the left of Saturn, will rise at 12:06 am. By 5 am, these two planets will be in the south in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 10:30, about an hour after sunset. Mars is in the picture, but the twilight is overpowering it. Created using Stellarium.

Mars with Venus setting at 11 pm

Mars with Venus setting at 11 pm, an hour and a half after sunset. Also, visible may be the bright star Regulus in the constellation of Leo the lion with the asterism of the Sickle or backwards question mark that delineate the head and mane of the beast. Created using Stellarium.

Saturn, Jupiter and the Moon in morning twilight

Saturn, Jupiter and the Moon in morning twilight of 5 am, about an hour before sunrise. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon at last quarter

The Moon at last quarter as it might be seen in binoculars or small telescope at 5 am, July 1, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets the night of 06/30/21-07/01/21

The planets as seen in a telescope (north up) with the same magnification for the night of June 30/July 1, 2021. Times of the display are: Venus, 10:30 pm; Saturn and Jupiter, 5 am. Apparent diameters: Venus, 11.19″; Saturn 18.29″, its rings 42.62″; Jupiter, 45.30″. Mars has an apparent diameter of only 3.86″ and is not represented. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night sunset 063021 to sunrise 070121

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 30, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the July 1st. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/23/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 23, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 23rd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 9:32, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:58. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 5:30 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm or a little after. Venus will set at 11:07 pm. Mars can be found in the west-northwest at 11pm, It’s in Cancer and is currently passing in front of the Beehive star cluster which can be spotted in a pair of binoculars. Mars will set at 11:38 pm as it is slowing losing its race with the Sun. Saturn and Jupiter, are in the morning sky. Saturn will actually rise before midnight at 11:44 pm. It’s seen with the stars of Capricornus. Brighter Jupiter, to the left of Saturn, will rise at 12:34 am. By 5 am, these two planets will be in the south and south-southeast in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT-4). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and Mars in Evening twilight

Venus and Mars in Evening twilight, seen at 10:30 pm, about an hour after sunset. Venus is about 5 1/2 degrees in altitude above a sea or lake horizon. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon tonight at 10:30 pm, approximately 16 hours before actual full moon. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon tomorrow morning

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon tomorrow morning at 5 am, about an hour before sunrise. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

The planets as seen in a telescope

The planets as seen in a telescope (north up) with the same magnification for the night of June 23/24, 2021. Times of the display are: Venus, 10:30 pm; Saturn and Jupiter, 5 am. Apparent diameters: Venus, 10.94″; Saturn 18.16″, its rings 42.29″; Jupiter, 44.38″. Mars has an apparent diameter of only 3.91″ and is not represented. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night sunset 062321 to sunrise 062421

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 23, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 24th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

06/16/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 16, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 16th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 1 day before first quarter, will set at 1:55 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm or a little after. Venus will set at 11:04 pm. Mars can be found in the west-northwest at 10:30 tonight, It’s in Cancer and by next Wednesday will pass in front of the Beehive star cluster which can be easily seen in a pair of binoculars. Check it out each night before then and watch Mars approach the cluster, now to its upper left. Mars will set at 11:55 pm. Jupiter and Saturn, are in the morning sky. Saturn will rise at 12:12 am. It’s seen with the stars of Capricornus. Brighter Jupiter, to the left of Saturn, will rise at 1:01 am. By 5 am, these two planets will be in the south-southeast in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 10 pm or a half hour after sunset tonight over a sea or Lake Michigan horizon. Venus is a bit less than 10 degrees altitude. Created using Stellarium.

Moon, Mars and Venus tonight

The Moon, Mars and Venus at 11 pm or an hour and a half after sunset tonight over a sea or Lake Michigan horizon. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Mars and the Beehive star cluster

Mars and the Beehive star cluster at 11 pm tonight as they might be seen in binoculars. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear tonight in binoculars or small telescope tonight. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Saturn in the morning

Jupiter and Saturn at 5 am or an hour before sunrise tomorrow morning. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter to scale

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter. Venus at the same magnification. Venus, seen at 10 pm, will be 10.72″ in diameter. Saturn at 5 am will be 18.00″ in diameter, its rings 44.43″ in extent. And Jupiter will be 43.43″. The normal cutoff for whether to show a planet here is an apparent diameter of 10″ or greater. Mars doesn’t make the cut, its apparent diameter will be 3.98″ tonight. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 16, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 17th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

 

06/02/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s look for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 2, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 2nd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 22 minutes, setting at 9:22, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:59. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 3:10 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus can be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm. Venus will set at 10:49 pm. Mars can be found in the west at 10:30 tonight, and about to leave the constellation of Gemini, the twins. Tonight it’s below and left of Gemini’s brightest star, Pollux. Mars will set at 12:34 am. Jupiter and Saturn, are in the morning sky. Saturn will rise at 1:08 am. It’s seen with the stars of Capricornus. It has begun its retrograde or westward motion caused by the fact that we are viewing it from another moving planet. Brighter Jupiter, is now within the boundaries of Aquarius, and will rise at 1:55 am. By 5 am these two planets will be in the south-southeast in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus on a flat lake horizon at 10 pm

Venus on a flat lake horizon at 10 pm (38 minutes after sunset), June 2, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Mars finder chart

Mars finder chart for 11 pm, June 2, 2021. Created using Stellarium.

Saturn, Jupiter and the Moon an hour before sunrise

Saturn Jupiter and the crescent Moon at 5 am, about an hour before sunrise. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning crescent Moon as it should appear in binoculars, tomorrow morning at 5 am, June 3, 2021.

Jupiter and Saturn's appearance in small telescopes

Saturn and Jupiter as seen in a small telescope at the same magnification at 5 am June 3, 2021. Apparent diameters: Saturn, 17.64″, rings, 41.09″; Jupiter, 41.51″. Mars is too far away to make out detail on its surface, except maybe a polar cap. Its apparent diameter is 4.13″. Venus’ apparent diameter is 10.35″ and will be added when it gets far enough from the Sun to be easily seen. The normal cutoff for whether to show a planet here is an apparent diameter of 10″ or greater. The symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on June 2, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 3rd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/26/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 26, 2021 Comments off

There is a lunar eclipse this morning. See https://bobmoler.wordpress.com/2021/05/25/05-25-2021-ephemeris-viewing-the-lunar-eclipse-tomorrow-morning/

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 26th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 12 minutes, setting at 9:16, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:03. The Moon, at full today, will rise at 9:57 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus might be spotted low in the west-northwest twilight by 10 pm. Mercury will be a bit above and left of Venus, but is now too dim to spot. Venus will set at 10:36 pm. Mars can be found in the west at 10:30 tonight, in the constellation of Gemini the twins. Tonight it’s on the left side of the constellation, below Gemini’s brightest star, Pollux. Mars will set at 12:37 am. Jupiter and Saturn, are in the morning sky. Saturn will rise at 1:36 am. It’s seen with the stars of Capricornus. Brighter Jupiter, now within the boundaries of Aquarius, will rise at 2:21 am. By 5 am they will be in the southeast in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in the evening
Venus and where Mercury should be, see text, at 10 pm May 2, 2021. Created using Stellarium.
Mars at 11 pm May 26, 2021, seen below Pollux. Created using Stellarium.
The Moon as it might appear at 11 pm tonight. Shadows are starting to appear on the upper right edge of the Moon 17 hours after full moon. Created using Stellarium.
Jupiter and Saturn in the morning
Jupiter and Saturn seen in the southern sky at 5 am, May 27, 2021. Created using Stellarium.
Telescopic Jupiter and Saturn
Saturn and Jupiter as seen in a small telescope at the same magnification at 5 am May 27, 2021. Apparent diameters: Saturn, 17.45″, rings, 40.64″; Jupiter, 40.58″. Mars is too far away to make out detail on its surface, except maybe a polar cap. Its apparent diameter is 4.22″. Venus’ apparent diameter is 10.21″ and will be added when it gets far enough from the Sun to be easily seen. Mercury’s apparent diameter is 10.20″. The normal cutoff for whether to show a planet here is an apparent diameter of 10″ or greater. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).
Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 26, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 27th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/19/2021 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 19, 2021 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 19th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 59 minutes, setting at 9:09, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:09. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 3:26 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Mars will be joined by two more planets seen in twilight. Both Mercury and Venus are now just above where the Sun set. By 10 pm Mercury should be able to be spotted low in the west-northwest. Venus might be spotted lower and somewhat earlier, it’s a lot brighter than Mercury. Venus will be setting at 10:21 pm with Mercury following at 11:04. Mars can be found in the west at 10:30 tonight, in the constellation of Gemini the twins. Tonight it’s in the middle of the constellation. Mars will set at 12:42 am. Jupiter and Saturn, are in the morning sky. Saturn will rise at 2:03 am, with brighter Jupiter rising at 2:43 am. By 5 am they will be in the southeast in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and Mercury in twilight
Mercury and Venus as they might appear at 10 pm tonight over a low Lake Michigan horizon. Mercury will be that hard to spot. Binoculars will help. Mercury is getting dimmer as its phase becomes an increasingly thinner crescent. Venus here is only 3 degrees above the Horizon. For other locations, this is 51 minutes after sunset. Created using Stellarium.
Mars finder animation
Mars finder animation for 11 pm tonight, May 19, 2021. Mars is no longer a first magnitude star-like object, having dropped to second magnitude. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.
Telescopic Moon
The Moon as it might appear in a telescope tonight at 11 pm May 19, 2021 (03:00 UT 05/20/2021 for folks not in the US Eastern Daylight Time Zone). Two of my favorite craters (Tycho and Clavius) are on the terminator tonight. Created using Stellarium.
Jupiter and Saturn in the morning
Jupiter and Saturn as they might appear at 5 am tomorrow morning. Created using Stellarium.
Telescopic planets
Saturn and Jupiter as seen in a small telescope at the same magnification. Apparent diameters: Saturn, 17.28″, rings, 40.24″; Jupiter, 39.81″. Mars is too far away to make out detail on its surface, except maybe a polar cap. Its apparent diameter is 4.30″. Venus’ apparent diameter is 10.00″ and will be added when it gets far enough from the Sun to be easily seen. Mercury’s apparent diameter is 8.88″. The normal cutoff for whether to show a planet here is an apparent diameter of 10″ or greater. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).
Planets and Moon at sunrise and sunset
Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 19, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 20th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/28/2021 – Ephemeris – Searching for the naked-eye planets for this week

April 28, 2021 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 28th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 7 minutes, setting at 8:44, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:35. The Moon, 2 days past full, will rise at 11:06 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. Unfortunately the only one you’ll find in the evening is Mars. It can be found in the west at 10 pm tonight, in the constellation of Gemini the twins. Tonight it’s just above Castor’s foot. Mars will set at 1:21 am. Both Venus and Mercury are now just east of the Sun and to close to it to be spotted. Venus will be setting 43 minutes after sunset, with Mercury setting 27 minutes later. We should start spotting Mercury next week. It will be late May or early June before Venus will be easily seen. Jupiter and Saturn, are west of the Sun in the morning twilight. Saturn will rise at 3:24 am, with Jupiter rising at 4:03 am. By 6 am they will be low in the southeast. Jupiter, on the left, is the brighter of the two.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Venus and Mercury marginally visible over a Lake Michigan horizon 16 minutes after sunset at 9 pm tonight April 28, 2021. Venus will be 4 degrees altitude, Mercury will be 7 degrees altitude.
Mars finder animation for 10 pm tonight, April 28, 2021. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.
The waning gibbous Moon as it might be seen in binoculars or small telescope at midnight overnight April 29, 2021. Created using Stellarium.
Jupiter and Saturn in the morning twilight of 6 am tomorrow morning, April 29, 2021. Created using Stellarium.
Saturn and Jupiter as seen in a small telescope at the same magnification. Apparent diameters: Saturn, 16.65″, rings, 38.78″; Jupiter, 37.26″. Mars is too far away to make out detail on its surface, except maybe a polar cap. Its apparent diameter is 4.67″. Venus’ apparent diameter is 9.81″ and will be added next week. Mercury’s apparent diameter is 6.2″. The cutoff for whether to show a planet here is an apparent diameter of 10″ or greater. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).
Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 28, 2021. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 29th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.