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06/20/2018 – Ephemeris – Let’s check out the bright planets for this week

June 20, 2018 Leave a comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 20th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 9:31, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 2:29 tomorrow morning.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for and at the bright planets. Three of them are in the evening sky. The brilliant beacon of Venus will be visible in the western twilight from about 9:50 p.m. until it sets at 11:59 p.m. Mercury is far below and right of it, setting at 10:48 p.m. Jupiter will be in the south as it gets dark. Jupiter is only outshone by Venus and the Moon. And after Venus sets will have the night to itself as the brightest star-like object until it sets at 3:34 a.m. Binoculars will show it to be bigger than star-like in size. Saturn will rise at 9:46 p.m. in the east-southeast. Mars will rise at 12:07 a.m. and is now outshining Saturn, and in July and August will even outshine Jupiter.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and Mercury

Venus and Mercury at 10 p.m., about a half hour after sunset, June 20, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Evening Planets

Venus, the Moon and Jupiter at 10:30 p.m., about an hour after sunset, on June 20, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Venus

The phase exhibited by Venus in a telescope on June 20, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 10:30 p.m. June 20, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and moons

Jupiter and moons at 10:30 p.m. June 20, 2018. The image shows Europa in transit of Jupiter. A satellite is normally invisible against the face of Jupiter, but its shadow can be seen falling on the planet. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Satellite  Event        Local Date/Time       Universal Date/Time
Europa:   Transit start 20 Jun 2018  9:06 pm  21 Jun 2018 1:06
Europa:   Shadow start  20 Jun 2018 10:57 pm  21 Jun 2018 2:57
Europa:   Transit end   20 Jun 2018 11:20 pm  21 Jun 2018 3:20
Europa:   Shadow end    21 Jun 2018  1:12 am  21 Jun 2018 5:12

Source of satellite events:  https://www.projectpluto.com/jevent.htm

Morning planets

Morning planets at 5 a.m. June 21, 2018. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Mars and Saturn telescopicly

Saturn and Mars with the same magnification with an inset of Mars at higher magnification at 5 a.m. June 21, 2018. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Note on the inset image.  The south polar cap is probably larger than shown.  Also with the dust storm in progress the dark features may be obscured.  The dust storm clouds appear brighter than the normal surface of the planet.

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on June 20, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 21st. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

 

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06/15/2018 – Ephemeris – Earliest sunrise and a look at Venus

June 15, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, June 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 11:25 this evening.

Today saw the earliest sunrise of the year at 5:56 a.m. We’re 6 days from the summer solstice.

The two day old Moon tonight will appear below and to the right of Venus. Tomorrow night it will have moved to be left and above Venus. This weekend it will be fun to look at Venus and the Moon in binoculars or a small telescope. In a small telescope Venus, though small is definitely not round. It has a gibbous phase and appears 75% illuminated by the Sun. It’s still a bit farther than the Sun, at 109 million miles (175 million km). By the end of October it will come to less than a quarter that distance from us and be invisible in the Sun’s glare. Its phase will get skinnier as its size grows in our telescopes until then.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and the Moon

Venus and the Moon tonight June 15, 2018 at 10:30 p.m. Created using Stellarium.

Venus apparent sizes

Comparison of apparent sizes of the planet Venus, tonight June 15 and near Inferior conjunction. I was 2 days late using my memory. The date will be October 26th. Created using Stellarium.

06/06/2018 – Ephemeris – Our weekly look at the bright planets

June 6, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 6th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 27 minutes, setting at 9:25, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 2:43 tomorrow morning.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for and at the bright planets. Two of them are visible in the evening sky. The brilliant beacon of Venus will be visible in the western twilight from about 9:45 p.m. until it sets at 12:07 a.m. Jupiter will be in the south-southeast as it gets dark. Jupiter is only outshone by Venus and the Moon. And after Venus sets will have the night to itself as the brightest star-like object until it sets at 4:32 a.m. Binoculars will show it to be bigger than star-like in size flanked by little star-like moons. Saturn will rise at 10:45 p.m. in the east-southeast. Mars will rise at 12:50 a.m. and is now outshining Saturn, and will, in July and August even outshine Jupiter.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Venus and Jupiter at 10:30 p.m. June 6, 2018. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and moons

Jupiter and moons at 10:30 p.m. June 6, 2018. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Morning planets

Morning planets and the Moon at 4:30 a.m. June 7, 2018. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 4:30 a.m. June 7, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic morning planets

Saturn and Mars with the same magnification with an inset of Mars at higher magnification at 4:30 a.m. June 7, 2018. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on June 6, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 7th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/30/2018 – Ephemeris – Its Wednesday, time to locate the bright planets

May 30, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 30th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 18 minutes, setting at 9:19, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:00. The Moon, 1 day past full, will rise at 10:18 this evening.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. Two of them are in the evening sky. The brilliant beacon of Venus will be visible in the western twilight from about 9:40 p.m. until it sets at 12:04 a.m. Jupiter will be in the southeast as it gets dark. Jupiter is only outshone by Venus and the Moon. And after Venus sets will have the night to itself as the brightest star-like object until it sets at 5:02 a.m. Binoculars will show it to be bigger than star-like in size, that is it will appear as a tiny orb flanked by little star-like moons. Saturn will rise at 11:14 p.m. in the east-southeast. Mars will rise at 1:28 a.m. and is now outshining Saturn, and will, this summer even outshine Jupiter.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Venus and Jupiter tonight May 30 2018. at 10 p.m. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Jupiter

Jupiter and moons in a telescope at 10 p.m., May 30, 2018 Created using Cartes du Ciel.

Io is in front of the planet. Its transit will begin at 10:37 p.m. EDT (2:37 UT May 31)
Io’s shadow will start to cross Jupiter at 11:07 p.m. EDT (3:07 UT May 31)
Io’s transit og Jupiter will end at 12:45 a.m. May 31 (4:45 UT)
Io’s Shadow will leave the face of Jupiter at 1:16 a.m. May 31 (5:16 UT)

Times above from https://www.projectpluto.com/jevent.htm

Morning planets

Morning planets Saturn and Mars plus the Moon at 5 a.m. May 31, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars at 5 a.m. May 31, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Mars and Saturn

Saturn and Mars with the same magnification with an inset of Mars at higher magnification at 5 a.m. May 31, 2018. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 30, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 31st. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

05/23/2018 – Ephemeris – Wednesday is bright planet day on Ephemeris

May 23, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 23rd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 6 minutes, setting at 9:13, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:05. The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:56 tomorrow morning.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. Two of them are in the evening sky. The brilliant beacon of Venus will be visible in the western twilight from about 9:35 p.m. until it sets at 11:54. Jupiter will be in the southeast as it gets dark. Jupiter is only out shown by Venus and the Moon. And after Venus sets will have the night to itself as the brightest star-like object until it sets at 5:31 a.m. Binoculars will show it to be not quite star-like in size, that is it will appear as a tiny orb flanked by little star-like moons. Saturn will rise at 11:43 p.m. in the east-southeast. Mars will rise at 1:28 a.m. and is now outshining Saturn, and will, this summer even outshine Jupiter.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Panorama of the Moon and planets

Panorama of the Moon and planets Venus and Jupiter at 10 p.m. May 23, 2018. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in a small telescope or binoculars tonight May 23, 2018 at 10 p.m. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and moons

Jupiter and its 4 Galilean moons at 10 p.m. EDT May 23, 2018 (2:00 UT, May 24, 2018) Io is transiting the face of Jupiter at that time. Io transit begins at 8:52 p.m. EDT ():52 UT, Shadow start 9:13 p.m. EDT 1:13 UT, Transit ends 11:00 p.m. EDT, 3:00 UT, Shadow ends at 11:22 p.m. EDT, 3:22 UT.  Io actually will be practically invisible during its transit, but its shadow may be spotted in small telescopes. Created using Stellarium. 

Morning planets

The morning planets Mars and Saturn at 5 a.m. May 24, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic morning planets

Saturn and Mars with the same magnification with an inset of Mars at higher magnification at 5 a.m. May 24, 20`8. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 23, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 24th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/02/2018 – Ephemeris – We’re taking our weekly look at the bright planets

May 2, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 2nd. The Sun rises at 6:31. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 17 minutes, setting at 8:49. The Moon, 3 days past full, will rise at 11:31 this evening.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. One bright planet is in the evening sky, the brightest, Venus. It will be visible low in the western twilight from about 9:10 p.m. until it sets at 11:15. The star Aldebaran will be seen below and left of Venus tonight. Jupiter will rise this evening at 9:11 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet, which it will be next Wednesday. Saturn will rise at 1:09 a.m., while Mars will rise at 2:18 a.m.

At 5:30 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south, with Mars to the left of Saturn with the Moon between Jupiter and Saturn.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 9:15 p.m, tonight May 2, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planets

The morning planets at 5:30 a.m. May 3, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The waning gibbous Moon at 5:30 a.m. May 3, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic morning planets

The morning planets as seen in a telescope using the same magnification at 5:30 a.m. May 3, 2018. A magnified image of Mars is inset showing some of the features that may be visible under higher magnification. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on May 2, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 3rd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/25/2018 – Ephemeris – It’s bright planet Wednesday

April 25, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 25th. The Sun rises at 6:41. It’ll be up for 13 hours and 58 minutes, setting at 8:40. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 5:22 tomorrow morning.

It’s Wednesday again and time to look for the bright planets. One bright planet is in the evening sky, the brightest, Venus. It will be visible low in the western twilight from about 9:10 p.m. until it sets at 10:58. Venus is blindingly bright in binoculars or a small telescope. Jupiter will rise this evening at 9:42 p.m. That doesn’t make it an evening planet. It has to rise before sunset to be an evening planet. Give it a couple of weeks. Saturn will rise at 1:37 a.m., while Mars will rise at 2:33 a.m.

At 6 tomorrow morning these three planets will be strung across the southern sky. Bright Jupiter will be in the southwest, dimmer Mars and Saturn will be in the south, with Mars to the left of Saturn in the morning twilight.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location

Addendum

Venus in evening twilight

Venus in evening twilight at 9 p.m, tonight April 25, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

The Gibbous Moon

The Gibbous Moon tonight at 10 p.m., April 25, 2018. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planets

The morning planets at 6 a.m. April 26, 2018. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic morning planets

The morning planets as seen in a telescope using the same magnification. A magnified image of Mars is inset showing some of the features that may be visible under higher magnification. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on April 25, 2018. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 26th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.