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Posts Tagged ‘‘Oumuamua’

09/09/2019 – Ephemeris – Looking for interstellar meteoroids hitting the Moon

September 9, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, September 9th. Today the Sun will be up for 12 hours and 50 minutes, setting at 8:05, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:15. The Moon, 4 days past first quarter, will set at 3:29 tomorrow morning.

Two Harvard University astronomers who have studied the interstellar asteroid or comet that was discovered last year ‘Oumuamua are proposing to observe small interstellar meteoroids with a lunar orbiting satellite when they hit the Moon. A spectrum of the flash they make when they hit the Moon will allow the constituent elements and isotopes to be discovered. These values have been studied for a long time from meteorites in our solar system. So a body from another solar system born of material from a different supernova and hypernova than our solar system may show different isotope ratios of its elements. A hypernova is a newly discovered event, when two neutron stars collide, and are the main source of heavy elements like gold.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

'Oumuamua

Artist visualization of ‘Oumuamua. Credit Credit: European Southern Observatory / M. Kornmesser.

There’s the article about it on Universe Today:  https://www.universetoday.com/143234/by-continuously-watching-the-moon-we-could-detect-interstellar-meteorites/

 

11/15/2018 – Ephemeris – Last year’s interstellar visitor was acting funny

November 15, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, November 15th. The Sun will rise at 7:39. It’ll be up for 9 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 5:14. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 12:18 tomorrow morning.

Last year about this time a fast moving asteroid with an odd cigar shape passed through the inner solar system. It’s velocity was such that it didn’t come from around here, meaning our solar system. It was named ‘Oumuamua by its discoverers in Hawai’i. It was spotted as it was heading out, away from the Sun. As it does so, it decelerates as the Sun’s gravitational pull tries to pull it back in. After studying its motion, astronomers noticed that it wasn’t decelerating as fast as it should if it was on a simple ballistic trajectory. Something about it was accelerating it, or causing it to not decelerate as fast as it should. Despite rampant speculation that it’s an interstellar craft on social media ‘Omuamua’s acceleration is well within that possible for comets.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

'Oumuamua
Artist visualization of ‘Oumuamua. Credit: European Southern Observatory / M. Kornmesser
Orbit of 'Oumuamua
Orbit of ‘Oumuamua 1I/2017 U1. Uncredited image from Ars Technica.