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Posts Tagged ‘Saturn’

06/22/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 22, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 22nd. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 9:32, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 2:48 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, although Mercury may be too close to the Sun to be seen. It might just be visible low in the east-northeast after 5. That’s at least for those as far north as we are. At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from Mercury, actually invisible, near the horizon, brilliant Venus low in the east-northeast to Saturn higher in the south. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, stretching from east to southeast, will be the Moon, Mars and Jupiter. Mars is quite a bit dimmer than Jupiter. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the south. The naked-eye planets are arranged in the morning sky, in the same order as their distances from the Sun.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The morning planets and Moon tomorrow morning

The morning planets and the waning crescent Moon at 5 am tomorrow morning, June 23, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 95 degrees. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Waning crescent Moon closeup, annotated

Waning crescent Moon closeup, annotated, as seen in binoculars or a small telescope. Created using Stellarium, Libreoffice and GIMP.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, June 23, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Saturn 17.99″, its rings 41.90″; Jupiter 39.86″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 7.00″ and is 86.1% illuminated; Venus 12.27″, 84.1% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree). Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 22, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 23rd. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/15/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 15, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 15th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:30, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 1 day past full, will rise at 11:27 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, although Mercury may be too close to the Sun to be seen. It might just be visible low in the east-northeast after 5. That’s at least for those as far north as we are. At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from Mercury near the horizon, brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the south-southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, in the east-southeast are Mars and Jupiter. Mars is quite a bit dimmer than Jupiter. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the south-southeast. The naked-eye planets are arranged in the morning sky, in the same order as their distances from the Sun.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear at midnight June 16, 2022, through binoculars or a small telescope. Atmospheric refraction will affect the shape of the Moon when it’s very low in the sky. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planets

Morning planets at 5 am tomorrow morning, June 16, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 87 degrees. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Saturn, Jupiter, and Venus (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, June 16, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Saturn 17.80″, its rings 41.47″; Jupiter 39.02″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.81″ and is 86.4% illuminated; Venus 12.66″, 82.2% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).


Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 15, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 16th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/08/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 8, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 8th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 29 minutes, setting at 9:26, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:57. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 3:08 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, although Mercury may be too close to the Sun to be seen. It might just be visible low in the east-northeast after 5 am around mid-month. That’s at least for those as far north as we are. At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the south-southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, in the east-southeast are Mars and Jupiter. Mars is quite a bit dimmer than Jupiter. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the south-southeast. The naked-eye planets are arranged in the morning sky, in the same order as their distances from the Sun.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Waning gibbous Moon tonight

Waning gibbous Moon tonight with prominent features labeled. Created using Stellarium, GIMP and LibreOffice.

Morning planets at 5 am

Morning planets at 5 am tomorrow morning, June 9, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 79 degrees. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, June 9, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 13.10″, 80.3% illuminated; Saturn 17.60″, its rings 41.01″; Jupiter 38.23″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.63″ and is 86.8% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 8, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 9th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

06/01/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

June 1, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 1st. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 21 minutes, setting at 9:21, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:59. The Moon, 2 days past new, will set at 11:49 this evening.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky, although Mercury is too close to the Sun to be seen, and might just be visible low in the east-northeast after 5 am around mid-month. That’s at least for those as far north as we are. At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the south-southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, in the east-southeast are Mars and Jupiter. Mars is quite a bit dimmer than Jupiter. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the south-southeast. Though Mercury will enter the evening sky first, it won’t have great visibility. Saturn will enter the evening sky August 14th.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon in binoculars tonight

The two-day-old Moon as it might be seen in binoculars tonight, June 1, 2022. Earth shine might illuminate the Moon’s night side. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

Morning planets at 5 am

Morning planets at 5 am tomorrow morning, June 2, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. The span of the planets from Venus to Saturn is 70 degrees. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, June 2, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 13.58″, 78.3% illuminated; Saturn 17.40″, its rings 40.54″; Jupiter 37.49″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.46″ and is 87.2% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts), planet information from Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on June 1, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 2nd. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

Update on the Tau Herculid meteor shower of May 31st.

The meteor shower was rather weak. I saw one during an hour and a half of observing, slowly moving over the Big Dipper. The sky was “clear”, but there was a haze to it. It definitely wasn’t crystal clear. I’ve heard from others who had a bit more success.

05/25/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 25, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 25th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 10 minutes, setting at 9:15, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:04. The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 4:22 tomorrow morning. | Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. All the naked-eye planets are back in the morning sky, although the newcomer, Mercury, is too close to the Sun to be seen, and may stay that way for the rest of its morning appearance. That’s at least for those as far north as we are (45° N). At 5 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the southeast. To the right of Venus, tomorrow morning, will be the thin crescent Moon. Farther right is the quite bright Jupiter. Just to the right of Jupiter will be the dimmest of the 4, Mars, which is closing on Jupiter. The two will seem to pass each other on Sunday. All will be in line sloping to the upper right with Saturn all by its lonesome in the southeast.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Morning planets

All the morning planets except Mercury, which is too close to the Sun to be seen, will be visible at 5 am tomorrow morning, May 26, 2022. The labels for Mars and Jupiter are on top of each other. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Waning crescent moon

The waning crescent moon as it might appear in binoculars tomorrow morning, May 26, 2022. Earth shine might also illuminate the Moon’s night side. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:00 am, May 26, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 14.13″, 76.1% illuminated; Saturn 17.20″, its rings 40.06″; Jupiter 36.80″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.30″ and is 87.7% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on May 25, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 26th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/18/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 18, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 18th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 56 minutes, setting at 9:07, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:10. The Moon, 2 days past full, will rise at 12:43 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. The one bright planet in the evening sky, Mercury, will pass between us and the Sun this Saturday to join the rest of the naked-eye planets in the morning sky. So that’s where the planet action is. At 5:15 am tomorrow, the planets will be spread out from brilliant Venus low in the east to Saturn higher in the southeast. Venus may be missed at that time, but may be up sufficiently by 5:30. To the right of Venus is the quite bright Jupiter. Farther right will be the dimmest of the 4, Mars, which is closing on Jupiter. The two will seem to pass each other on the 29th of this month. All will be in line, sloping to the upper right. They are still quite a sight to behold in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Annotated Moon animation

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tomorrow morning at 1:30 May 19, 2022. Created using Stellarium, GIMP and LibreOffice.

The morning planet parade

The morning planet parade is widening as Venus is moving away from Jupiter and toward the Sun. Mars is approaching Jupiter and will catch up to it on the 29th. These are shown at 5:15 am, or about an hour before sunrise tomorrow morning, May 19, 2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:15 am, May 19, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 14.73″, 73.9% illuminated; Saturn 16.99″, its rings 39.59″; Jupiter 36.17″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 6.14″ and is 88.1% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on May 18, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 19th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets except Mercury are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/11/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 11, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 11th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 40 minutes, setting at 8:59, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:18. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 4:45 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. The one bright planet in the evening sky, Mercury, is now too dim and close to the Sun to be seen, so the only planet action is in the morning sky where the other 4 naked-eye planets are. At 5:15 am tomorrow the planets will be spread out low from the east to southeast with brilliant Venus lowest and due east to Saturn almost exactly in the southeast. Venus may be missed at that time, but may be up sufficiently by 5:30. To the right of Venus is the quite bright Jupiter. Farther right will be the dimmest of the four, Mars. Farther to the right will be Saturn. All will be in A sloping to the upper right. They are still quite a sight to behold in the morning twilight.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Annotated Binocular Moon

Animated annotated Binocular Moon for this evening, May 11, 2022. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas, GIMP and LibreOffice.

Translations

Mare Crisium – Sea of Crises
Mare Fecunditatis – Sea of Fertility
Mare Frigoris – Sea of Cold
Mare Imbrium – Sea of Showers
Mare Nectaris – Sea of Nectar
Mare Nubium – Sea of Clouds
Mare Serenitatis – Sea of Serenity
Mare Tranquillitatis – Sea of Tranquility
Mare Vaporum – Sea of Vapors
Sinus Iridium – Bay of Rainbows
Sinus Medii – Bay of the Center

Note that Mare is pronounced Mar-é

Morning planet parade

The morning planet parade is widening as Venus is moving away from Jupiter, and Mars is approaching Jupiter. These are shown at 5:15 am, or about an hour before sunrise tomorrow morning, May 12, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:15 am, May 12, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 15.42″, 71.6% illuminated; Saturn 16.79″, its rings 39.12″; Jupiter 35.60″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 5.99″ and is 88.6% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on May 11, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 12th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets except Mercury are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/04/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

May 4, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Wednesday, May 4th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 23 minutes, setting at 8:51, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:27. The Moon, halfway from new to first quarter, will set at 1:03 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. There is one bright planet in the evening sky. Mercury may be spotted around and after 10 this evening very low in the west-northwest and be visible for the next half hour or so before it sets at 10:40 pm. After that, the planet action shifts to the morning sky. The other 4 naked-eye planets are there. By 5:30 or 5:45 am, the planets will be spread out low from the east to southeast with brilliant Venus lowest in the east, higher and right is Jupiter. Dim Mars will be farther to the right and a bit above Jupiter, while brighter Saturn will be even farther right and above Mars. All four will have risen by 5 am, but it will take a very low eastern horizon to pick them all up at that time.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mercury in evening twilight

Mercury in evening twilight, with competition from bright winter stars and the Moon at 10 pm, or about an hour after sunset. It might take a pair of binoculars to pick Mercury out of twilight.
Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might appear in binoculars tonight, showing earth shine. May 4, 2022. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planet parade

The morning planet parade is widening as Venus is moving away from Jupiter, and Mars is approaching the giant planet. These are shown at 5:30 am, or about an hour before sunrise. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:30 am, May 5, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 16.33″, 68.7% illuminated; Saturn 16.60″, its rings 38.67″; Jupiter 35.09″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 5.84″ and is 89.1% illuminated. Mercury, in the evening, has an apparent diameter of 9.21″, and it’s 22.2% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on May 4, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 5th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets except Mercury are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/27/2022 – Ephemeris – Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week

April 27, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Wednesday, April 27th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 4 minutes, setting at 8:42, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:37. The Moon, 3 days before new, will rise at 5:56 tomorrow morning.

Let’s search for the naked-eye planets for this week. There is one bright planet in the evening sky. Mercury may be spotted around and after 9:30 this evening very low in the west-northwest and be visible for the next hour or so before it sets at 10:43 pm. After that, the planet action shifts to the morning sky. The other 4 naked-eye planets are there. By 5:45 am, the planets will be spread out low from the east to southeast with brilliant Venus closer than ever to Jupiter, lowest in the east. Dim Mars will be to the right and a bit above Venus, while brighter Saturn will be right and above Mars. Saturn will rise tomorrow at 4 am, with Mars following at 4:40. Venus will rise at 5:10 tomorrow morning, followed by Jupiter four minutes later.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Mercury and bright winter stars in evening twilight

Mercury and bright winter stars in evening twilight at 9:30 tonight, or about 45 minutes after sunset tonight, April 27, 2022. It might take binoculars to spot the stars of Orion and Taurus, and Mercury itself, which is fading, becoming a crescent. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium.

The morning planet parade

The morning planet parade at 5:45 am or about 50 minutes before sunrise tomorrow, April 28, 2022. Venus will overtake Jupiter during the day, Saturday the 30th. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Venus in binoculars

Jupiter and Venus in as they might be seen in binoculars, Saturday morning, April 30, 2022. The difference in brightness of Venus compared to Jupiter will be much greater than seen here. The planets will be about a half a degree apart, or about the width of the Moon. The image shows two satellites of Jupiter, Ganymede to the lower left of Jupiter and Callisto to the upper right. A third satellite, Io, is close to the upper right, within the enlarged Jupiter image. Europa is either behind the planet or in its shadow. Sunday morning, Jupiter will be on the other side of Venus, and a bit farther away. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic views of Venus, Saturn and Jupiter

Views of Venus, Jupiter, and Saturn (north up) as they would be seen in a small telescope, with the same magnification, tomorrow morning at 5:45 am, April 28, 2022. I do not show planets less than 10 seconds of arc in diameter. Apparent diameters: Venus 16.78″, 67.4% illuminated; Saturn 16.47″, its rings 38.35″; Jupiter 34.76″. Mars is not shown, its apparent diameter is 5.74″ and is 89.5% illuminated. Mercury, in the evening, has an apparent diameter of 8.05″, and it’s 35.6% illuminated. The ” symbol means seconds of arc (1/3600th of a degree.) Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Planets and the Moon on a single night

The naked-eye planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise on a single night, starting with sunset on the right on April 27, 2022. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 28th. Notice that all the naked-eye planets except Mercury are in the morning sky now. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/26/2022 – Ephemeris – Tomorrow is the Moon’s final stop in passing the parade of morning planets

April 26, 2022 Comments off

This is Bob Moler with Ephemeris for Tuesday, April 26th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 1 minute, setting at 8:41, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:38. The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 5:37 tomorrow morning.

Also, tomorrow morning, the Moon will conclude its sweep under the four bright planets of the morning sky by being seen below the left-most and lowest of the four, Jupiter. With nearby Venus, it makes a small right triangle The other planets in order to the right of Jupiter are Venus, Mars and finally Saturn. Jupiter and Venus are appearing to get closer to each other every day now. They will cross paths in conjunction this Saturday. Venus is slowly retreating back and around behind the Sun. Jupiter now appears to be moving away from the Sun. Both, however, are still moving eastward against the stars, it’s just that Venus is moving faster. Next month, when the Moon passes by these planets, they will be a different order.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EDT, UT – 4 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon passing the morning planets from Sunday to Wednesday mornings 4/24 to 4/27/2022

The Moon passing the morning planets from Sunday to Wednesday mornings 4/24 to 4/27/2022. Note also the approach of Jupiter and Venus. Their paths will cross on Saturday, 4/30/2022. Click on the image to enlarge it. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.