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Posts Tagged ‘Saturn’

08/16/2017 – Ephemeris – Looking for the whereabouts of the bright planets

August 16, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 16th. The Sun rises at 6:46. It’ll be up for 13 hours and 59 minutes, setting at 8:45. The Moon, 2 days past last quarter, will rise at 2:16 tomorrow morning.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. Jupiter is sinking in the west-southwest as it gets dark in the evening. The bright blue-white star Spica, which pales in comparison to Jupiter, is seen left of it. Jupiter is moving eastward towards Spica now. It will pass north of Spica on September 11th. Jupiter will set at 10:50 p.m. Saturn can now be seen in the south as evening twilight fades. The reddish star Antares is off to the right of Saturn. Saturn’s rings are spectacular in telescopes. It will set at 1:52 a.m. In the morning sky, brilliant Venus will rise at 3:48 a.m. and be visible until about 6:15 tomorrow morning. Mars and Mercury are now too close to the Sun for us to see, unless the moon completely covers the Sun for you next Monday.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter and Saturn and southern summer constellations at 10 p.m. August 17, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and Moons

Jupiter and its moons at 10 p.m. August 16, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Saturn and moons

Saturn and its brightest moons overnight August 16/17, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Venus and the Moon in the morning

The Moon and Venus at 5:30 a.m. August 17, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 5:30 p.m. August 17, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Venus is becoming almost to small to view its gibbous shape in telescopes.  It’s disk is only 13 seconds of arc in diameter, smaller than Saturn’s disk, so I’m discontinuing showing it’s disk.

Planets and Moon on a single night

Planets at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on August 16, 2017. The night ends on the left with sunrise on August 17. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

08/09/2017 – Ephemeris – Where are the bright planets tonight?

August 9, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 9th. The Sun rises at 6:38. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 18 minutes, setting at 8:56. The Moon, 2 days past full, will rise at 10:06 this evening.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. Jupiter is sinking in the west-southwest as it gets dark in the evening. The bright blue-white star Spica, which pales in comparison to Jupiter, is seen left of it. In even the smallest telescopes Jupiter’s four largest moons can be seen. They shift positions from night to night. Jupiter will set at 11:15 p.m. Saturn can now be seen in the south as evening as twilight fades. The reddish star Antares is off to the right of Saturn. Saturn’s rings are spectacular in telescopes. It will set at 2:20 a.m. In the morning sky, brilliant Venus will rise at 3:38 a.m. and be visible until about 6 tomorrow morning. Mars and Mercury are now too close to the Sun for us to see.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter and Saturn at 10 p.m. August 9, 2017. Jupiter is slowly approaching Saturn in our skies and will pass Saturn on December 21, 2020, and every 20 years for the rest of this century. Created using Stellarium.  Click on the image to enlarge.

Jupiter and its moons

Jupiter and its moons at 10 p.m. August 9, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Saturn and its brightest moons

Saturn and its brightest moons overnight August 9/10, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

The Moon and Venus

The Moon and Venus at 5:30 a.m. August 10, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 5:30 p.m. August 10, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Venus

Venus in a telescope on the morning of August 10, 2017. It is greatly enlarged here to show its phase. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and Moon on a single night

Planets at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on August 9, 2017. The night ends on the left with sunrise on August 10. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

08/04/2017 – Ephemeris – View the Moon and planets Jupiter and Saturn tonight

August 4, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Friday, August 4th. The Sun rises at 6:32. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 30 minutes, setting at 9:03. The Moon, 3 days before full, will set at 4:32 tomorrow morning.

Tonight the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will hold a viewing night at Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory starting at 9 p.m. The celestial objects featured will be Jupiter, early, them the Moon and Saturn. Some of the brighter deep sky objects will be also seen as it gets dark. Deep sky objects are dim objects beyond the solar system like star clusters and nebulae, clouds of gas and dust either illuminated by stars or hiding them from view. The observatory’s telescopes are augmented by telescopes set up by members of the society. We also welcome the public to bring their telescopes to learn how to use them. The observatory is located south of Traverse City on Birmley Road.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

08/02/2017 – Ephemeris – Lets check in on the bright planets for this week

August 2, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, August 2nd. The Sun rises at 6:30. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 35 minutes, setting at 9:06. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 3:00 tomorrow morning.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. Jupiter is sinking in the west-southwest as it gets dark in the evening. The bright blue-white star Spica, which pales in comparison to Jupiter, is seen left of it. In even the smallest telescopes Jupiter’s four largest moons can be seen. They shift positions from night to night. Jupiter will set at 11:41 p.m. Saturn can now be seen in the south as evening as twilight fades. Tonight Saturn will be just below and left of the waxing gibbous Moon. The reddish star Antares is off to the right of Saturn. Saturn’s rings are spectacular in telescopes. Saturn will set at 2:48 a.m. In the morning sky, brilliant Venus will rise at 3:29 a.m. and be visible until about 6 tomorrow morning. Mars and Mercury are too close to the Sun for us to see now.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter, Saturn and the Moon at 10 p.m., August 2, 2017. Created using Stellarium. Click on image to enlarge.

The Moon and Saturn

The Moon and Saturn at 10 p.m. EDT August 2, 2017. The Moon is moving to the left (eastward) at about its diameter every hour, so observers at different longitudes will see it in a different position depending on their time zone. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter

Jupiter and its moons at 10 p.m. August 2, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Saturn

Saturn and its brightest moons overnight August 2/3, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Venus rising

Venus with Orion rising at 5:30 a.m. August 3, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Venus

Venus in a telescope on the morning of August 3, 2017. It is greatly enlarged here to show its phase. Created using Stellarium

Planets and Moon on a single night

Planets at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on August 2, 2017. The night ends on the left with sunrise on August 3. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/26/2017 – Ephemeris – Let’s check out the bright planets for this week

July 26, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 26th. The Sun rises at 6:22. It’ll be up for 14 hours and 51 minutes, setting at 9:14. The Moon, 3 days past new, will set at 11:20 this evening.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. Jupiter is sinking in the west-southwest as it gets dark in the evening. The bright blue-white star Spica, which pales in comparison to Jupiter, is seen left of it. In even the smallest telescopes Jupiter’s four largest moons can be seen. They shift positions from night to night. Jupiter will set at 12:06 a.m. Saturn can now be seen in the south as evening as twilight fades. The reddish star Antares is off to the right of Saturn. Saturn’s rings are spectacular in telescopes. Saturn will set at 3:17 a.m. In the morning sky, brilliant Venus will rise at 3:25 a.m. and be visible until about quarter to 6 tomorrow morning. Mars is in conjunction with the Sun today, that is it’s almost directly behind the Sun, For the last week and the next, no commands will be sent to the orbiters and rovers on Mars due to the radio interference of the Sun.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Jupiter and Saturn with the southern summer constellations and the crescent Moon at 10:30 p.m., July 26, 2017. Created using Stellarium. Click on image to enlarge.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might be seen in binoculars showing also Earth shine at 10:30 p.m. July 26, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Jupiter and its moons

Jupiter and its moons at 10:30 p.m. July 26, 2017. The Great Red Spot will cross the planet’s central meridian at 11:39 p.m. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Saturn and its moons

Saturn and its brightest moons overnight July 26/27, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Venus in the morning

Venus with the stars of autumn at 5 a.m. July 27, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Venus

Venus as it might be seen through a telescope at 5 a.m. July 27, 2017. This is displayed at a larger scale/magnification than the Jupiter or Saturn images above. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and Moon on a single night

Planets at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on July 26, 2017. The night ends on the left with sunrise on July 27. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

07/21/2017 – Ephemeris – There’s an astronomy event tomorrow night

July 21, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Friday, July 21st. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 2 minutes, setting at 9:19, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:18. The Moon, 2 days before new, will rise at 5:28 tomorrow morning.

Tomorrow, Saturday, the 22nd, there, will be viewing of the summer starry skies at the Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory starting at 9 p.m. While starting before sunset, if it’s clear Jupiter should be spotted before 10 p.m. The planet Saturn and its rings will also be featured. By 10:30 the sky should be dark enough to spot some of the wonders among the stars, like star clusters, and nebulae that are the either the birth places of stars or the expelled remnants of dying stars. The Milky Way takes over the dark sky, it is its wonders that we see. The Observatory is located south of Traverse City on Birmley road. Take Garfield Road two traffic lights south of South Airport Road to turn right at Birmley Road.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

07/19/2017 – Ephemeris – Our weekly look at the bright planets

July 19, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Wednesday, July 19th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 5 minutes, setting at 9:21, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:16. The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 3:33 tomorrow morning.

Let’s take our weekly look at the bright planets. Jupiter is in the west-southwest as it gets dark in the evening. The bright blue-white star Spica, which pales in comparison to Jupiter, is seen left of it. In even the smallest telescopes Jupiter’s four largest moons can be seen. They shift positions from night to night. Jupiter will set at 12:32 a.m. Saturn can now be seen in the evening as twilight fades in the south. The reddish star Antares is off to the right of Saturn. Saturn’s rings are spectacular in telescopes. Saturn will set at 3:46 a.m. In the morning sky, brilliant Venus will rise at 3:22 a.m. and be visible until about quarter to 6 tomorrow morning. Mercury sets too close to sunset to be easily seen now.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Jupiter and Saturn

Jupiter and Saturn with the southern summer constellations at 10:30 p.m., July 19, 2017. Created using Stellarium. Click on the image to enlarge.

Jupiter and moons

Jupiter and three of its moons. Io can be seen here in transit of the planet, but very difficult in reality, at 10:30 p.m,. July 19, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Project Pluto has the following events for the 12/13th:

Time is UT.  Events prior to 20 July 2:35 UT (10:35 p.m. 19 July EDT) or later than 4:24 UT or 12:24 a.m. EDT will not be visible from Northern Michigan.  Data from Project Pluto:  https://www.projectpluto.com/jevent.htm#jun.  The website also has a link to a list of Great Red Spot transits.

I : Tra start: 20 Jul 2017 1:21
I : Sha start: 20 Jul 2017 2:35
I : Tra end : 20 Jul 2017 3:32
II : Occ start: 20 Jul 2017 4:24
I : Sha end : 20 Jul 2017 4:46
II : Occ end : 20 Jul 2017 6:54
II : Ecl start: 20 Jul 2017 6:55
II : Ecl end : 20 Jul 2017 9:17

Satellites: I = Io and II = Europa

Tra = Transit of a satellite across the face of Jupiter, Sha = Transit of a moon’s shadow, Ecl = Eclipse (In Jupiter’s shadow), Occ = Occultation (Moon behind the planet).

The Great Red Spot transit: 20 Jul 2017 02:50 (10:50 p.m. 19 July EDT).

Saturn and moons

Saturn and its brightest moons overnight July 19/20, 2017. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Venus and the Moon

Venus and the Moon at twice its actual size at 5 a.m. July 20, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The Moon as it might be seen in binoculars showing also Earth shine at 5 a.m. July 20, 2017. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic Venus

Venus as it might be seen through a telescope at 5 a.m. July 20, 2017. This is displayed at a larger scale/magnification than the Jupiter or Saturn images above. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and Moon on a single night

Planets at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on July 19, 2017. The night ends on the left with sunrise on July 20. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.