Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Sinus Iridium’

11/07/2019 – Ephemeris – The gibbous Moon tonight

November 7, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, November 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours and 55 minutes, setting at 5:23, and it will rise tomorrow at 7:30. The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 3:13 tomorrow morning.

Every night when we look at the Moon the sunrise terminator has moved farther west on the Moon which is to our east uncovering more landscape. The Moon rotates once in about 29 ½ days in relation with the Sun. This is the same time it orbits the Earth from new Moon to the next. We call that a lunation or lunar month. Near the upper left corner of the Moon is what looks like a half crater. It’s called Sinus Iridium, the Bay of Rainbows. It’s at the edge of Mare Imbrium or Sea of Showers. To the south cut by the terminator is Oceanus Procellarum, the flat Ocean of Storms. South of that is the small Mare Humorum, the Sea of Vapors. South of all that is the odd shaped crater Schiller.
10-11-2016 has images

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Gibbous Moon tonight

The gibbous Moon tonight at 8 p.m., November 7, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

LRO data

Sinus Iridium photographed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as texture mapped on the globe of the Virtual Moon Atlas.

Clavius

Clavius as photographed by one of the Lunar Orbiter spacecraft in the 1960s From Digital Lunar Orbital Photographic Atlas. This is photographed from overhead.  On tonight’s moon it’s near the bottom or south end and is foreshortened.Credit Jeff Gillis, Lunar and Planetary Institute.

 

01/26/2018 – Ephemeris – The Moon tonight: The Bay of Rainbows

January 26, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, January 26th. The Sun will rise at 8:08. It’ll be up for 9 hours and 34 minutes, setting at 5:43. The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:59 tomorrow morning.

A look at the Moon tonight will reveal that the sunrise line, or terminator has almost completely revealed the large sea of Showers or Mare Imbrium to the upper left of center of the gibbous disk. At the extreme upper left straddling the terminator is one of my favorite features, the Bay of Rainbows or Sinus Iridium. It’s a colorful name for something that’s as gray as the rest of the Moon. It looks like a bay off of Imbrium, and has an arch like a rainbow. It’s arch is the Jura Mountains, which jut into Mare Imbrium at Cape Heraclide, just catching sunlight, and Cape Laplace farther into morning. What’s cool is catching it as the sunlight is hitting the mountains while the convex floor, following the Moon’s curvature is only partially illuminated.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon with Sinus Iridium

The Moon at 8 p.m. January 26, 2018 highlighting Sinus Iridium. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

LRO data

Sinus Iridium photographed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as texture mapped on the globe of the Virtual Moon Atlas.

10/11/2016 – Ephemeris – Looking at the Moon tonight

October 11, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, October 11th.  The Sun will rise at 7:53.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 10 minutes, setting at 7:04.  The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:26 tomorrow morning.

We looked at the Moon in the last program, now 24 hours later the sunrise terminator has moved farther west, our east uncovering more landscape.  The Moon rotates once in about 29 ½ days in relation with the Sun.  This is the same time it orbits the Earth from new Moon to the next.  We call that a lunation or lunar month.  Near the upper left corner of the Moon is what looks like a half crater.  It’s called Sinus Iridium, the Bay of Rainbows.  It’s at the edge of Mare Imbrium or Sea of Showers.  To the south cut by the terminator is Oceanus Procellarum, the flat Ocean of Storms.  South of that is the small Mare Humorum, the Sea of Vapors.  Between then is a distinctive crater Gassendi.  South of all that is the odd shaped crater Schiller.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

The Moon tonight

The Moon at 9 p.m. October 11, 2016. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

LRO data

Sinus Iridium photographed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as texture mapped on the globe of the Virtual Moon Atlas.

The crater Gassendi from Apollo 16 - NASA

The crater Gassendi from Apollo 16 – NASA

LRO Image

The craters Schickard and Schiller as seen from above from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. The Sun will start to rise on Schickard tomorrow night. Credit NASA from Virtual Moon Atlas.

05/16/2016 – Ephemeris – The Sun rises on the Bay of Rainbows

May 16, 2016 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, May 16th.  Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 53 minutes, setting at 9:06.   The Moon, 3 days past first quarter, will set at 4:23 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the Sun will rise at 6:11.

One of my favorite lunar formations is creeping into sunlight on the Moon this evening.  Look to the upper left edge of the moon tonight.  The large sea or dark area of the Moon, the Man in the Moon’s right eye as he’s looking at us is Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Showers.  At the top left edge of that sea is a large notch.  And keeping with of seas these of the first telescopic astronomers its name is Sinus Iridium, or Bay of Rainbows, a colorful name for something as colorless as the rest of the Moon.  The terminator which is the sunrise line will be cutting across that bay, illuminating the semicircular mountain ring that surrounds it before all of the floor is illuminated.  It can be seen in binoculars or a small telescope.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Sinus Iridium

Image showing the Moon tonight at 10 p.m., May 16, 2016 (2 hr, May 17, 2016 UT) with Sinus Iridium (Bay of Rainbows) just coming into sunlight. Created using the Virtual Moon Atlas.

10/22/2015 – Ephemeris – My favorite lunar feature

October 22, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, October 22nd.  The Sun will rise at 8:07.  It’ll be up for 10 hours and 39 minutes, setting at 6:46.   The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 3:10 tomorrow morning.

The Moon tonight is revealing my favorite feature, Sinus Iridium or Bay of Rainbows.  Unfortunately features on the Moon are not that colorful.  The Bay of Rainbows is surrounded on three sides by a semicircular mountain range called the Jura Mountains which is actually a broken down crater wall.  The Bay is a bay in Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Showers.  It is the nomenclature of land forms on planets and moons that still have Latin names in astronomy.  That and constellations.  Of course the Bay of Rainbows and the Sea of Showers aren’t real bodies of water.  These were the product of the imaginations of astronomers looking through their primitive telescopes, at a completely alien landscape.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Sinis Iridium on Moon Globe

The Moon tonight with Sinus Iridium peeking out into the morning sunlight on the Moon, 9 p.m. October 2015. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

LRO data

Sinus Iridium photographed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as texture mapped on the globe of the Virtual Moon Atlas.

08/24/2015 – Ephemeris – The Bay of Rainbows

August 24, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, August 24th.  The Sun rises at 6:55.  It’ll be up for 13 hours and 38 minutes, setting at 8:34.   The Moon, 2 days past first quarter, will set at 2:17 tomorrow morning.

One of my favorite lunar formations is creeping into sunlight on the Moon this evening.  Look to the upper left edge of the moon tonight.  The large sea or dark area of the Moon, the Man in the Moon’s right eye as he’s looking at us is Mare Imbrium, the Sea of Showers.  At the top left edge of that sea is a large notch.  And keeping with of seas these of the first telescopic astronomers its name is Sinus Iridium, or Bay of Rainbows, a colorful name for something as colorless as the rest of the Moon.  The terminator which is the sunrise line will be cutting across that bay, illuminating the semicircular mountain ring that surrounds it before all of the floor is illuminated.  It can be seen in binoculars or a small telescope.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Moon

The Moon at 10 p.m. August 24, 2015 showing the location of Sinus Iridium. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

Sinius Iridium

The moon at 10 p.m. August 24, 2015 with Sinus Iridium extending into the lunar night. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

This is for 2 hr UT August 25, 2015.

03/11/2014 – Ephemeris – Observing the moon tonight: Bay of Rainbows and more

March 11, 2014 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, March 11th.  The sun will rise at 8:02.  It’ll be up for 11 hours and 41 minutes, setting at 7:43.   The moon, 4 days past first quarter, will set at 5:39 tomorrow morning.

The moon tonight is a pretty fat gibbous shape, with the sunrise line or terminator revealing the Bay of Rainbows, Sinus Iridium, that large half crater at the moon’s upper left edge, and the edge of the Sea of Showers, Mare Imbrium.  In the figure of the man in the moon Imbrium is his big eye, kind of like the cartoon “Bill the Cat”.  To the right of it, looking like a hole in a mountain chain, is Plato, whose dark floor is unmistakable even at full moon, when shadows are absent.  The crater Copernicus is now beginning to be washed out as the morning shadows shrink.  To the left of Copernicus, just catching the sun’s rays on the terminator, is the smaller crater Kepler.  When the moon is full Kepler will show a fine ray system.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Moon

The Moon at 10 p.m. on March 11, 2014. Created using Virtual Moon Atlas.

Note for those not in the Eastern Daylight time zone.  10 p.m. is 2 hours March 12, 2014. If viewing before that time the terminator will be shifted to the right.  After the terminator will be shifted to the left.