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Posts Tagged ‘summer solstice’

06/20/2013 – Ephemeris – Summer starts tomorrow

June 20, 2013 1 comment

Ephemeris for Thursday, June 20th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:31.   The moon, 3 days before full, will set at 4:15 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

Summer will arrive overnight at 1:04 a.m. tomorrow morning when the sun will reach its highest point in the northern sky.  If you were watching the sun’s shadow of a flag pole at local noon, when the sun is due south, it would be getting shorter every day since the winter solstice back on December 21st.  From tomorrow until the next winter solstice that shadow will be getting longer.  We are getting the most heat from the sun now due to the length of daylight and the high altitude of the sun most of the day. Because the earth and water takes time to heat up, we are not experiencing our greatest temperatures yet.  That will take a month or a month and a half.  That’s why solstice just starts summer and is not at the peak of it.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Solstice shadows

Comparison of shadows between winter and summer solstices. Note the angles are approximate.

06/20/2012 – Ephemeris – Summer begins tonight!

June 20, 2012 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, June 20th.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:31.   The moon, 1 day past new, will set at 10:12 this evening.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

We interrupt our weekly planet report to bring you this important news.  At 7: 07 (EDT) this evening summer will begin.  That instant of time is called the summer solstice.  Solstice means “sun standstill”.  That makes today the longest day in terms of daylight hours, though you will notice very little change for the next week or so.  We have come to the point in earth’s orbit when the north pole of the earth is tipped its maximum toward the sun so the northern hemisphere will receive the most heat from the sun.  The southern hemisphere will experience at that same instant their winter solstice.  The earth now is not at its closest to the sun.  In fact we’ll be at our farthest from the sun in two weeks.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

06/21/11 – Ephemeris – Summer solstice is today

June 21, 2011 Comments off

Tuesday, June 21st.  Today the sun will be up for 15 hours and 33 minutes, setting at 9:31.   The moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 12:46 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the sun will rise at 5:57.

At 1:16 this afternoon the sun will reach its greatest angle north of the celestial equator or 23 ½ degrees.  The date and the point in the sky where the sun is at that instant is called the summer solstice, or summer sun standstill.  It means the point at which the sun seems poised farthest north before heading southward.  This would be most noticeable if you were monitoring the height of the sun at noon or the sun’s rising or setting point day by day as the ancients did.  Besides being the day with the longest sunlight we, in the northern hemisphere, are also receiving more intense heat from the sun than any other day of the year.  Still hotter weather is in store as the northern hemisphere continues to warm up.

* Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.