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Posts Tagged ‘Telescope Clinic’

01/07/2022 – Ephemeris – Help with your telescope tonight

January 7, 2022 Comments off

This is Ephemeris for Friday, January 7th. Today the Sun will be up for 8 hours and 59 minutes, setting at 5:19, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:19. The Moon, 2 days before first quarter, will set at 11:18 this evening.

Did you or someone in your family get a telescope for Christmas, or have one in a closet or attic because you don’t know how to put it together or how to operate it? Or maybe you are trying to figure out which one to buy. Well, tonight’s your night. The Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will host a virtual telescope clinic via Zoom starting at 8 pm. Professor Jerry Dobek of Northwestern Michigan College will demonstrate the types of telescopes and how to use them. He and other members may be able to help particular problems by seeing participants telescopes using their webcams or smartphones. This should be interesting, to say the least. Go to gtastro.org for information and a link for the meeting.

The astronomical event times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan (EST, UT – 5 hours). They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Here’s a quick guide to telescopes, how they work, and what’s important in selecting one that I wrote some time ago: Telescope Basics2.pdf

Alternately, when we get back to in-person star parties at the Northwestern Michigan College’s Joseph H. Rogers Observatory, we invite folks to bring their telescopes. Members can have a look at them at or near the end of the evening.

01/03/2020 – Ephemeris – Astronomical events this weekend

January 3, 2020 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, January 3rd. The Sun will rise at 8:20. It’ll be up for 8 hours and 54 minutes, setting at 5:14. The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 1:49 tomorrow morning.

Tonight at 8 p.m. there will be a telescope clinic by the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society at the Rogers Observatory south of Traverse City on Birmley Road for those who have either received a telescope for Christmas or have one hidden away in an attic, to learn how to use it. Bring ‘em if you’ve got ‘em.

Tomorrow morning we’ll see the peak of the Quadrantid meteor shower after the Moon sets. The radiant for this shower is near the handle of the Big Dipper, though they will be seen all over the sky. The peak should be around 3:20 a.m. with the possibility of over a hundred meteors visible per hour.

On Sunday at 5 a.m. the Earth will be its closest to the Sun for the year of 91,394,000 miles (147,085,000 km).

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Quadrantid radiant

The location of the Quadrantid radiant at 3:20 a.m. January 4, 2020 for the peak of the meteor shower. Created using Stellarium.

Earth's orbit

The Earth’s orbit, somewhat exaggerated, showing perihelion and the seasons. Credit “Starts with a Bang” blog by Ethan Siegel.

01/06/2017 – Ephemeris – Telescope Clinic tonight at the NMC Observatory

January 6, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Friday, January 6th.  The Sun will rise at 8:19.  It’ll be up for 8 hours and 59 minutes, setting at 5:18.  The Moon, 1 day past first quarter, will set at 2:34 tomorrow morning.

If you’ve received a telescope for Christmas and are having trouble setting it up, or have an unused one in a closet, basement or attic, bring them to Northwestern Michigan College’s Rogers Observatory tonight at 8 p.m.  The Grand Traverse Astronomical Society will be holding their annual telescope clinic to help you understand and use your telescope.  The clinic will extend through the period that will be set aside for a star party if it’s clear, to test the telescopes and show the owners how to use them.  Like anything telescopes take some time to learn how to use them and find celestial objects.  It took me 15 minutes to find Saturn with a telescope the first time I tried, and I knew where it was in the sky.  The observatory is south of Traverse City on Birmley Road.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

In Memorium

Emmett Holmes

Emmett Holmes passed away last night (January 5th, 2017) after a long ordeal in attempting to have stem cells from his sister infused into his blood to rebuild his bone marrow. We at the Grand Traverse Astronomical Society knew him for a few short years, but in the time we benefited greatly from his expertise with telescopes and, helping out with star parties.. In the picture is his 13″ telescope with its distinctive tube that he built. Just recently he was elected to the Board of Directors of the Society.
We at the GTAS express our condolences to his wife Karen and the rest of his family. Emmett, rest in peace.