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Posts Tagged ‘Venus’

01/08/2020 – Ephemeris – Looking for the naked-eye planets

January 8, 2020 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, January 8th. Today the Sun will be up for 9 hours even, setting at 5:19, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:19. The Moon, 2 days before full, will set at 7:15 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus is our evening star low in the southwest in the early evening. It will set at 8:20 p.m. Saturn sets only 20 minutes after sunset and is not visible. It will pass behind the Sun on the 13th and will then join Jupiter in the morning sky. Jupiter is too close to the Sun in the morning twilight to be seen. Mars is visible in the morning sky and will rise in the east-southeast at 5:02 a.m. It’s not very bright because it’s 198 million (319 million km) miles away, but it’s getting slowly closer to the Earth at the rate of about 4 million miles (6 million km) a week. Mercury is now too close to the Sun to be seen in the morning, but will move into the evening sky on Friday.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and the Gibbous Moon in the evening

Venus and the Gibbous Moon in the evening tonight at 7 p.m. January 8, 2020. Orion is still easily spotted in the moonlight. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon this evening

The gibbous Moon as it might appear in binoculars at 7 p.m. January 8, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Very enlarged Venus

Venus, much larger than it would appear in any telescope to show its gibbous phase, tonight January 8, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Mars in the morning

Mars in the morning with the bright stars at 7 a.m. January 9, 2020. Note that Mars is approaching the red giant star Antares. The name Antares means “Rival of Mars” (Ant – anti, Ares -the Greek god of war that the Romans appropriated as Mars). Mars will pass 4.8 degrees north of Antares on the 17th. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on January 8, 2020. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 9th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

 

 

01/01/2020 – Ephemeris – A Happy New Year look at the naked-eye planets

January 1, 2020 Comments off

Happy New Year, this is Ephemeris for New Years Day, Wednesday, January 1st. 2020. The Sun will rise at 8:20. It’ll be up for 8 hours and 52 minutes, setting at 5:12. The Moon, 1 day before first quarter, will set at 11:48 this evening.

Let’s look at the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus is our evening star low in the southwest in the early evening. It will set at 8:02 p.m. Saturn sets only 50 minutes after sunset and is not visible. It will pass behind the Sun on the 13th and will then join Jupiter in the morning sky. Jupiter is too close to the Sun in the morning twilight to be seen. Mars is visible in the morning sky and will rise in the east-southeast at 5:04 a.m. It’s not very bright because it’s 202 million (326 million km) miles away, but it’s getting slowly closer to the Earth at the rate of about 4 million miles (6 million km) a week. Mercury is now too close to the Sun to be seen in the morning, but will move into the evening sky on the 10th.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and the Moon in the evening

Venus and the Moon in the evening tonight at 7 p.m. January 1, 2020. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The crescent Moon as it might appear in binoculars or a small telescope tonight at 7 p.m. January 1, 2020. Created using Stellarium.

Very enlarged Venus

Venus, much larger than it would appear in any telescope to show its gibbous phase, tonight January 1, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Mars in the morning

Mars in the morning with the bright stars at 7 a.m. January 1, 2020. Note that Mars is approaching the red giant star Antares. The name Antares means “Rival of Mars” (Ant – anti, Ares -the Greek god of war that the Romans appropriated as Mars). Mars will pass 4.8 degrees north of Antares on the 17th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on January 1, 2020. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 2nd. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

12/25/2019 – Ephemeris – A look at the naked-eye planets for Christmas

December 25, 2019 Comments off

Merry Christmas. This is Ephemeris for Christmas Day, Wednesday, December 25th. Today the Sun will be up for 8 hours and 48 minutes, setting at 5:07, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:18. The Moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 8:42 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus is our Christmas Star low in the southwest in the early evening. It will set at 7:43 p.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the southwestern sky in the evening, and will set at 6:26 p.m. Tonight Saturn will be about 16 ½ degrees or more than the width of a fist held at arms length right and below the much brighter Venus. Jupiter is lost in twilight. It will pass behind the Sun on the Friday, entering the morning sky.

Mars is in the morning sky and will rise in the east-southeast at 5:07 a.m. It’s not very bright because it’s 206 million (332 million km) miles away, but it’s getting slowly closer to the Earth. Mercury is now too close to the Sun to be seen in the morning.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Venus and Saturn low on the southwest tonight at 6 p.m. December25, 2019. Saturn is only 3 1/2 degrees above the Lake Michigan horizon. Created using Stellarium.

Very enlarged Venus

Venus, much larger than it would appear in any telescope to show its gibbous phase, tonight December 25, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Mars in the morning

Mars in the morning with the bright stars at 7 a.m. December 26, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on December 25, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 26th. The Moon at the morning hour is south of the Sun having just completing a solar eclipse for Asia. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

12/24/2019 – Ephemeris – Was this the star of Bethlehem?

December 24, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Christmas Eve, Tuesday, December 24th. Today the Sun will be up for 8 hours and 48 minutes, setting at 5:06, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:18. The Moon, 2 days before new, will rise at 7:41 tomorrow morning.

Many writers of the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD place Jesus’ birth around 2 BC, which had to be before Herod the Great’s death, which I suggest was in 1 BC marked by to a total lunar eclipse. So the Star of Bethlehem could appear several years later than the triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in 7 BC that’s been popular. In 3 and again in 2 BC there were star-like conjunctions or apparent joinings of the planets Jupiter and Venus against the backdrop of constellation of Leo the Lion. A lion is related to Judah, son of Jacob by a blessing the latter gave his 12 sons in Genesis. The first conjunction occurred in August of 3 BC in the morning sky. In June the next year the two planets got together again, this time in the evening sky, a month or more after Jesus would have been born in the lambing season of spring.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

August 12, 3 BC conjunction

Here is an animation created using Stellarium of Jupiter and Venus, the brighter of the two seeming to coalesce on August 12, 3 BC in the early morning twilight. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

The second appearance of the "Star"

On June 16th 2 BC, this time in the evening, Venus and Jupiter seem to coalesce as one, at least to the naked eye.  The first few frames contain the Sickle asterism of Leo the lion’s head and mane. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

I have much more information on this topic in my December 2, 2016 posting: https://bobmoler.wordpress.com/2016/12/02/12022016-ephemeris-my-talk-about-the-star-of-bethlehem-is-tonight/

12/18/2019 – Ephemeris – Where are the naked-eye planets for this week?

December 18, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, December 18th. Today the Sun will be up for 8 hours and 48 minutes, setting at 5:03, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:15. The Moon, 1 day before last quarter, will rise at 12:28 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus will be briefly visible low in the southwest before it sets at 7:25 p.m. Jupiter is lost in twilight. It will pass behind the Sun on the 27th and will enter the morning sky. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the southwestern sky in the evening, and will set at 6:46 p.m. Tonight Saturn will be about 8 ½ degrees or Nearly the width of a fist held at arms length right and below the much brighter Venus. Mars is in the morning sky and will rise in the east-southeast at 5:10 a.m. It’s not very bright because it’s 211 million (339million km) miles away, but it’s getting slowly closer to the Earth. Mercury is now too close to the Sun to be seen in the morning.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening planets

Venus and Saturn low ion the southwest tonight at 6 p.m. December18, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Really enlarged Venus

Venus, much larger than it would appear in any telescope to show its gibbous phase, tonight December 18, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning planet

Mars and the Moon in the morning with the bright stars at 7 a.m. December 19, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Morning Moon

The Moon as it might be seen in binoculars at 7 a.m. tomorrow December 19, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on December 18, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 19th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

12/11/2019 – Ephemeris – Where are the naked-eye planets now

December 11, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, December 11th. Today the Sun will be up for 8 hours and 52 minutes, setting at 5:02, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:10. The Moon, 1 day before full, will set at 8:28 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus will be briefly visible low in the southwest before it sets at 7:06 p.m. Jupiter is lost in twilight. It will pass behind the Sun on the 27th and will enter the morning sky. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the southwestern sky in the evening, and will set at 7:13 p.m. Tonight Saturn will be about 2 degrees or 4 moon widths to the upper right of the much brighter Venus. Mars is in the morning sky and will rise in the east-southeast at 5:13 a.m. It’s not very bright because it’s 215 million (346 million km) miles away, but it’s getting slowly closer to the Earth. Mercury is now too close to the Sun to be seen in morning twilight.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Venus and Saturn

Venus and Saturn low ion the southwest tonight at 6 p.m. December11, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Telescopic views of Venus and Saturn with the same magnification at 6 p.m. tonight December 11, 2019. In the morning, I will show Mars here when it reaches an apparent diameter of 10″ (seconds of arc). It’s currently 4.0″. By the way Venus is 11.8″. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Binocular Moon

The nearly full Moon at 6 p.m. tonight December 11, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Mars in the morning with the bright stars at 7 a.m. December 12, 2019. Mercury is on the horizon and most likely invisible. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on December 11, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 12th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

12/04/2019 – Ephemeris – Where are the naked-eye planets this week?

December 4, 2019 Comments off

Ephemeris for Wednesday, December 4th. Today the Sun will be up for 8 hours and 59 minutes, setting at 5:02, and it will rise tomorrow at 8:04. The Moon, at first quarter today, will set at 1:01 tomorrow morning.

Let’s look at the naked-eye planets for this week. Venus will be briefly visible low in the southwest before it sets at 6:54 p.m. Jupiter will be very difficult to spot below and right of Venus. It will set at 6:13 p.m. Saturn, the ringed planet, will be in the southwestern sky in the evening, and will set at 7:37 p.m. Mars is in the morning sky and will rise in the east-southeast at 5:16 a.m. It’s not very bright because it’s 219 million (353 million km) miles away, but it’s getting slowly closer to the Earth. Mercury can be spotted after it rises in the east at 6:25 a.m. This is pretty much the end of its morning visibility, as the planet is moving around and behind the Sun. These oscillations from one side to the other of the Sun take on average of 116 days.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Evening Planets

Jupiter, Venus and Saturn against a flat horizon tonight at 6 p.m. December 4, 2019. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium.

Binocular Moon

The slightly gibbous Moon as it might appear in binoculars at 6 p.m. December 4, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Telescopic planets

Telescopic views of Venus and Saturn with the same magnification at 6 p.m. tonight December 4, 2019. In the morning, I will show Mars here when it reaches an apparent diameter of 10″ (seconds of arc). It’s currently 4.0″. By the way Venus is 11.8″. Created using Cartes du Ciel (Sky Charts).

Morning planets

Mars and Mercury in the morning with the star Spica at 7 a.m. December 4, 2019. Created using Stellarium.

Planets and the Moon on a single night

Planets and the Moon at sunset and sunrise of a single night starting with sunset on the right on December 4, 2019. The night ends on the left with sunrise on the 5th. Click on the image to enlarge. Created using my LookingUp program.

78 orbits