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Posts Tagged ‘Virgo’

06/12/2018 – Ephemeris – Virgo the virgin

June 12, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Tuesday, June 12th. Today the Sun will be up for 15 hours and 32 minutes, setting at 9:28, and it will rise tomorrow at 5:56. The Moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 6:02 tomorrow morning.

Tonight in the sky: to the south, is bright Jupiter. The brightest star to the right of Jupiter is Spica. It is in the constellation and member of the of the zodiac: Virgo the virgin. Virgo is a large constellation of a reclining woman holding a stalk of wheat. The bright star in the center of the constellation, Spica, is the head of that spike of wheat; and as such it ruled over the harvest in two of Virgo’s guises as the goddesses Persephone and Ceres. Ceres is now a dwarf planet and the root of the word cereal. Virgo is also identified as Astraea the goddess of justice. The constellation of Libra, the scales of justice, which she is associated with, is found just east of her low in the southeast.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Virgo finder chart

Virgo finder animation for 10:30 p.m. June 12, 2018. Click on image to enlarge. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

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05/14/2018 – Ephemeris – Big Dipper: Pointer to the Stars

May 14, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, May 14th. Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 47 minutes, setting at 9:03, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:14. The Moon, 1 day before new, will rise at 6:45 tomorrow morning.

The Big Dipper points to other stars and constellations. Right now the Big Dipper is nearly overhead. The front bowl stars point to Polaris, the North Star which never seems to move in the sky. The handle can be used to find two stars. First follow the arc of the handle away from the bowl to find the fourth brightest night-time star Arcturus in the base of the kite shaped constellation of Boötes. Straighten the arc to a spike and continue to the south and you will come to the bright blue-white star Spica in Virgo the virgin. You can remember these stars with the phrase “Follow the arc of the handle to Arcturus and then spike to Spica” or if you prefer the alternate pronunciation of the latter star “Speak to Speeka”.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

As can be seen below, there was one pointer function that didn’t make it into the program:  A leaky dipper drips on Leo.

Big Dipper Pointer to the Stars

Using the Big Dipper as a pointer to other stars. The pointers to Polaris could be life saving, since it is always north. The view is southward. The cross displayed near the center is the zenith. One might want to lay down to take all this in. Created using my LookingUp program.

04/16/2018 – Ephemeris – The Virgo cluster of galaxies

April 16, 2018 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, April 16th. The Sun rises at 6:56. It’ll be up for 13 hours and 32 minutes, setting at 8:29. The Moon, 1 day past new, will set at 9:16 this evening.

The stars around the constellation Leo and Virgo below and left of it feature relatively few stars, compared to those around Orion and the other winter constellations. That isn’t just a lot of blank sky, but beyond what can be seen with the naked eye in the region of southwestern Virgo, just to the lower left of the tail star Denebola of Leo is a vast cluster of galaxies that outnumber the stars of the same brightness in that direction. It is the Virgo Galaxy Cluster. Astronomers shorten the name to the Virgo Cluster. Two centuries ago the comet hunter Charles Messier swept this region with his small telescope and found many fuzzy bodies that could be confused with comets. He didn’t know what they were, but they sure weren’t comets, because they didn’t move against the stars.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Brighter members of the Virgo Cluster. Created using Stellarium.

Brighter members of the Virgo Cluster. Created using Stellarium. Open circles are galaxies, circles with crosses are globular star clusters, outlying members of our Milky Way galaxy. This image is from a few years ago – Saturn, above Spica, has moved on.

05/15/2017 – Ephemeris – A look at the constellation of Virgo the virgin

May 15, 2017 1 comment

Ephemeris for Monday, May 15th.  Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 49 minutes, setting at 9:03, and it will rise tomorrow at 6:13.  The Moon, 3 days before last quarter, will rise at 1:03 tomorrow morning.

Tonight at 10 p.m. in the south-southeast, is the constellation and member of the of the zodiac: Virgo the virgin.  Now Jupiter is seen against the constellation appearing above and right of its brightest star, Spica.  Virgo is a large constellation of a reclining woman holding a stalk of wheat.  Spica, is the head of that spike of wheat; and as such it ruled over the harvest in two of Virgo’s guises as the goddesses Persephone and Ceres.  Virgo is also identified as Astraea the goddess of justice.  The constellation of Libra, the scales, which she is associated with, is found just east of her low in the east-southeast.  Early Christians who sought to de-paganize the heavens saw Virgo as the Virgin Mary.  Virgo is the host to a grand cluster of galaxies.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Virgo finder chart

Animated Virgo finder chart for 11 p.m., May 15, 2017. Created using Stellarium and GIMP.

04/17/2017 – Ephemeris – How to find the stars Arcturus and Spica from the Big Dipper

April 17, 2017 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, April 17th.  The Sun rises at 6:54.  It’ll be up for 13 hours and 35 minutes, setting at 8:30.  The Moon, 2 days before last quarter, will rise at 2:21 tomorrow morning.

The Big Dipper, now nearing the zenith at 10 p.m. points to several stars and constellations.  It’s handle points to two bright stars.  First we follow the arc of the handle to the bright orange star Arcturus, the 4th brightest night-time star.  The reason I say night-time is that the sun is a star also but by definition is not out at night.  The arc to Arcturus is a how to find Arcturus and a clue to its name.  Arcturus, midway up the sky in the east, lies at the base point of the kite shaped constellation of Boötes the herdsman.  From Arcturus, straighten out the arc to a spike and one soon arrives at Spica a blue-white star in Virgo the virgin, now low in the southeast.  It is below Jupiter this year.  Spica is also sometimes pronounced ‘Speeka’.

The times given are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan. They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Finding Arcturus and Spica

How to find the stars Arcturus and Spica from the Big Dipper in April 2017. Created using my LookingUp program.

05/14/2015 – Ephemeris – The constellation Virgo in mythology

May 14, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Thursday, May 14th.  Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 46 minutes, setting at 9:02.   The Moon, 3 days past last quarter, will rise at 4:51 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the Sun will rise at 6:14.

Tonight in the sky: to the left of the constellation of Leo the lion, which lies in the west-southwest at 11 p.m. is the next constellation of the zodiac: Virgo the virgin, is seen in the south.  Virgo is a large constellation of a reclining woman holding a stalk of wheat.  The bright star in the center of the constellation, Spica, is the head of that spike of wheat; and as such ruled over the harvest in two of Virgo’s guises as the goddesses Persephone and Ceres.  Virgo is also identified as Astraea the goddess of justice.  The constellation of Libra, the scales, is found just east of her.  Early Christians saw Virgo as the Virgin Mary.  Virgo is the home of the Virgo Cluster of thousands of galaxies.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Leo, Virgo, Libra

Virgo with the also mentioned constellations of Leo and Libra for 11 p.m., May 14, 2015. Created using Stellarium.

Virgo

Virgo as depicted in Urania’s Mirror, a set of constellation cards published in London c.1825. From the Library of Congress. H/T Wikipedia.

Libra

Libra as depicted in Urania’s Mirror, a set of constellation cards published in London c.1825. From the Library of Congress. H/T Wikipedia.

05/11/2015 – Ephemeris – How to find the constellation Virgo

May 11, 2015 Comments off

Ephemeris for Monday, May 11th.  Today the Sun will be up for 14 hours and 39 minutes, setting at 8:59.   The Moon, at last quarter today, will rise at 3:08 tomorrow morning.  Tomorrow the Sun will rise at 6:18.

Friday I talked about that in spring we are looking out the thin side of our Milky Way galaxy’s disk.  One of the large constellations we see in the south at 11 p.m. can be found using the Big Dipper overhead, follow the arc of the handle to the bright star Arcturus, the straighten the arc to a spike to reach Spica, a bright blue-white star in the south.  Spica is the brightest star in the constellation Virgo the virgin.  She represents the goddess of the harvest,  Virgo is holding a sheaf of wheat in depictions of her, and Spica is placed at the head of the sheaf.  In the space between Spica and Leo the lion to her right is, a great cluster just below naked eye visibility.  The Virgo cluster of galaxies.

Times are for the Traverse City/Interlochen area of Michigan.  They may be different for your location.

Addendum

Finding Virgo

Star hop from the Big Dipper through Arcturus to Spica and Virgo. Orientation for 11 p.m. on May 11, 2015. Created using Stellarium.